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Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 28 total)
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  • in reply to: Re-enabling the old forum #779757
    Skijor AK
    Participant

    I don’t mind the site at this point and don’t won’t to go back, more as a matter of not having another change.. Personally I’ve grown accustom to looking at the time stamp on the main categories and browsing from there. I use the mouse over with the actual topic a lot. That and I’m far less interested in whats going on and generally have very little to offer the community.

    As far as traffic dwindling, I think the forum change is the least of the factors. For one thing splitboarding has matured and many have moved on, become part of the business, gone pro, etc. Also many have gotten jaded for one reason or another, while others still have begun to see growth of the sport as a negative to the experience they originally sought.

    More than anything it just doesn’t snow much or very consistently anymore :(

    Snurfer brings up some points worth discussing.

    I have some similar thoughts on the subject. I think the community is torn for reasons not having to do with this site. For one, I think many of our desires are becoming more and more paradoxical as splitboarding exponentially increases in popularity. For instance, I want new and improved technology but I don’t want the sport to be industry driven. I believe that splitboarding is a great way for people to get out and experience life in the wilderness (which might motivate people to actively save that wilderness), but also hate crowded backcountry zones. I really don’t care about people “pushing the limits of the sport,” but learn a lot from the people that do. I want to keep my lines a close secret, but also want to show them to the internet. I hate seeing the sport grow into an industry, but love riding with new friends. I wince at each splitboarding movie that comes out, but I definitely watch each movie too.

    This rapid commodification, while placing us splitters in a chain of contradictions, is also dangerous. If our experiences don’t match up with those on TGR movies or Patagonia ads, somehow our day was a failure. This guy, for instance, got caught because he just wanted that perfect shot, probably a shot that could help make a career out of his hobby.
    http://www.tetongravity.com/video/snowboard/gigi-ruf-survives-avalanche

    Anyway, I think these are issues that the community, a community that was tinkering in their garages and hand-sawing boards in half just a few years ago, needs to address–especially as our meager trip reports and reviews get saturated by big-budget movies, Jackson Hole elites, REI credit cards, and Patagoochie advertisements.

    As for the site? I think the old one had that “in your garage” kind of feel. The new one…well the new one is still trying to figure out what it is. I don’t think it is bad (it actually looks great on my computer), but I think it triggers some nostalgia and confusion about what splitboarding was, is, and is becoming.

    in reply to: furberg 2.0 twin and freeride and womens #778268
    Skijor AK
    Participant

    I have 16 days on the 2.0 and am still loving it, from mellow days on Manitoba to some serious riding in Thompson Pass. I ride the 168 and have never had this thing sink. It planes on top like a champ, making riding playful and fun in the deeps. I have never had to apply pressure down on my back foot to stay floating, no matter the angle–it is a run-out monster! However, when it gets steep, it feels responsive. As responsive as a thinner board with magnetraction? Time will tell. But the float/responsive combo is definitely this board’s unique characteristic. The board floats so well, I could have gotten away with a 164. (I am 6′ 155). The top sheet is nice and doesn’t get damaged from hitting the skis together while skinning. I didn’t have to de-tune my edges to avoid damage. I was worried that the top sheet would accumulate snow but the Furberg actually sheds snow better than my Voile. I didn’t think the board halves were as sucked together as they could have been. It isn’t that the halves didn’t fit but that the screws were too close together. While I never actually noticed anything while riding, I still opted to put K-clips on. Problem solved. This is a little bit of a bummer though since I like the Voile hooks better.

    Someone asked how the durability of the base was a few weeks ago. Well, I have hit plenty of rocks and they still scrape in pretty good! Not sure if it is any more or less durable there.

    in reply to: SuperNatural? Not in my backcountry! #704140
    Skijor AK
    Participant

    “The planet is here for man’s enjoyment, smile and be happy and stop worrying about how some trees or frogs or bees are feeling.”

    “Have you been out in public lately? Do you see the decay and waste and the utter and complete low state of humanity that is most of the humans (notice my lack of the word ‘beings’) walking the planet.”

    I study environmental literature and teach in Alaska. Statements like these promote an anthropocentric ideology that has been cemented since the Renaissance. This ideology has resulted in humans that try to abstract themselves from the biosphere which has resulted in the strange ethical theory that the earth is a mass of otherness that is there for our enjoyment or usage. These are serious statements because they pit humans vs. not human, and leave those in power to decide what the boundaries are. Read the 17th-18th century arguments for slavery, they sound a lot like the environmental debates today. This “for the sake of humanity” is an ideological construct unwittingly forged by those in power to keep their power. The planet isn’t “here for” anyone.

    For those of you who are trying to say this debate is aesthetic, not an ethical; this is a claim I hear all the time and it is a straw-man meant to distract us–a play on words to fuddle us about while money is changing hands, reducing the environment, “owned” or not, to a financial signifier. The event you guys are talking about is not about some higher calling, “the promotion of the sport,” it is about money. So are all of the other “backcountry” films I have seen lately. Do you guys know how much a heli-tour is here in AK for the layman?
    Trip reports like those on this website get me more stoked for riding than any of these extreme films. I don’t care about the “boundaries of the sport” being pushed. I like to see people out in the mountains, connecting with something that doesn’t have a price tag on it. Not “dominating” a slope but connecting to it. I think that is why I like climbing up it first. I think, like Barrows said, finding these natural features is what the bc is about. This event, on the other hand, seems to indicate that the mountains aren’t good enough, that they need to be enhanced, that they are there “for” us.

    Sorry for the long post.

    in reply to: Update your avatar for a chance to win a G3 Bonesaw #686188
    Skijor AK
    Participant

    GSPs for life (and pick me for the saw please)!

    in reply to: Furberg Snowboards #683159
    Skijor AK
    Participant

    I have been riding a 168 2014/15 Furberg a few times now and have some details.
    Construction: The board has an acceptable level of craftsmanship. While its no Venture or NS, the Voile hooks seem to keep it together better than some boards I have seen (some runs of K2 for example). The top sheet is grey-green which is kind of ugly in a room but is absolutely beautiful in the white snow–very DPS like. The base is in need of waxing and says “furberg” on one side The top sheet has some texture on it which seems to be ultra-durable but might have some potential for snow build up. After clanking my nose and tail together on the skin track the top sheet seems to hold up to abuse. I haven’t noticed any snow build up as of yet, even in 30-35 degree weather weather and sticky snow.

    Skinning: The way up, with the little bit of camber, is wonderful. The board is wide (27 waist?) which allows me to adjust my Sparks bindings all the way back and give myself a little bit more toe-clearance for skinning in steeps. This is important since I use Fitwells that are about a 1/2 inch longer than my other soft boots. However, this width might cause some problems in a narrow skin track. I was in softer snow while skinning but realized that the track was much wider after I went through.

    The Ride: Awesome. I got lucky and found a few untouched and powdery summits to test it out on. In the deep powder the board planes on top with out having to apply pressure to the back foot. The board is just so easy to ride and turning is intuitive. I was worried about getting too long of a board but found that it was rather nimble, responsive, and easy to turn. When I hit a few icy spots under the powder the edges bit in and slowed me down without hooking and flipping me over. I will report more when I find some more variable and steep conditions to try it out on. One awkward moment in riding was on a “cat-track” type ski out on a snomobile trail. Turning on flats at super slow speeds was strange as it was kind of a pivot instead of a lean-style carve. Maybe I will get better at this. When it is steep and deep, however, I was impressed.

    I did get to ride the prior, non-cambered version of the Furberg and, in my brief experience, didn’t notice any differences in ride.

    Sking (a surprising benefit) In one exit, I had to turn the board into ski mode to push myself out of a long and flat exit. Unluckily, there was one more downhill in store which I did not go back into board mode for. However, the long side cut makes the board much less awkward to “ski” than previous splitboards I have tried to ski. Although I wasn’t quite dropping knees, I would say that I actually had fun and was in control. I was able to both pizza and french-fry on command! I end up having to do this more than I would like to admit so it actually is a plus for me!

    Overall this set-up is approaching ideal (especially if you have bigger feet (size 11) but hate typical “wide” boards like me).

    in reply to: Toe/Heel Drag Allowance (hardboots and softies) #678445
    Skijor AK
    Participant

    Just got a Furberg. Heel drag issues eliminated!

    in reply to: Fitwell Backountry Review with Remind Insoles Liner #677956
    Skijor AK
    Participant

    Powder_Rider,
    Thanks for the link.
    I think some of the problem w/ the Fitwell liners is that they are just a 1/2 inch too short for the shell.

    in reply to: Fitwell Backountry Review with Remind Insoles Liner #677954
    Skijor AK
    Participant

    Thanks for the review. I am having similar shin issues with the Fitwells. Do the Remind Insoles seem to have more “volume” than the stock liners? Thanks.

    in reply to: Toe/Heel Drag Allowance (hardboots and softies) #678439
    Skijor AK
    Participant

    @fustercluck wrote:

    @Skijor AK wrote:

    I am 6′ but only weigh 150 and have trouble jump turning the wide boards.

    Jump turns make me think of an old Scott Schmidt ski movie. Eat a few sandwiches and muscle that thing around! 😆

    I like being skinny for the skinning! I can skin/run up!
    But I should pack more sandwiches to “beef” up at the summit! Problem solved! :thumpsup:

    in reply to: Toe/Heel Drag Allowance (hardboots and softies) #678435
    Skijor AK
    Participant

    Taylor, I would love to see what you come up with.
    I measured my angles.
    Back foot: Heel= 56* and toe is 62*
    Front foot: Heel = 54* and toe is 60*

    While these indicate that I should move my bindings forward to equalize the angles, I am hesitant to do so as of right now the boots are centered (maybe even more forward than backwards?!).

    The problem is that the Fitwell’s toe is appropriately beveled/rockered while its heel is flat and blocky, making it stick out more(?!) when the bindings are at an angled stance (I usually do front foot 20* and back foot 5*), than when they are straight (0* angle). While this heel shape makes crampons “fit well” it is rather unfortunate for people like me in the mid-wide board category.

    The over-all length of the Fitwells are only 3/4 an inch longer than my old Forums but that flat/squared heel is kind of a problem! Also, I hate wide boards. I would be ok going up to 260 from 257 but don’t want to get into the 265+ range.
    I am 6′ but only weigh 150 and have trouble jump turning the wide boards.

    in reply to: Toe/Heel Drag Allowance (hardboots and softies) #678433
    Skijor AK
    Participant

    Thanks for the detailed replies.
    Maybe I should have started a hard boot vs. soft boot thread instead 🙄

    in reply to: What pack do you use? #654778
    Skijor AK
    Participant
    in reply to: Fitwell Backcountry #652499
    Skijor AK
    Participant

    Ordered a 295! Heres to some awesome, and hopefully more efficient, expeditions this winter! :guinness:

    in reply to: Fitwell Backcountry #652494
    Skijor AK
    Participant

    I posted this in a different thread but maybe it would be better to ask here:

    I know I am :deadhorse: but I want to be sure! Fitwells are an expensive purchase, after all. How did you all know what size to order from Fitwell?

    I would describe my feet as size US 10.75 My actual foot is 283mm (if I measured it accurately)

    In some snowboards boots I wear 11, some I wear 10.5 (even in the same company). My current soft boots are Forums in size 11. My Osolo mountaineering boots are 10.5.

    I don’t know what Fitwell size to get! Their chart ( http://fitwellboots.com/sizing-chart/ ) doesn’t match up with any other mondo charts ( http://www.skibootsizingcharts.com ) !

    Have you guys gone off of Fitwell’s sizing chart?
    Anyone willing to help?
    Thanks!

    in reply to: Fitwell sizing advise #631222
    Skijor AK
    Participant

    I know I am :deadhorse: but I want to be sure! This is an expensive purchase, after all.

    I would describe my feet as size US 10.75 My actual foot is 283mm (if I measured it accurately)

    In some snowboards boots I wear 11, some I wear 10.5 (even in the same company). My current soft boots are Forums in size 11. My Osolo mountaineering boots are 10.5.

    I don’t know what Fitwell size to get! Their chart ( http://fitwellboots.com/sizing-chart/ ) doesn’t match up with any other mondo charts ( http://www.skibootsizingcharts.com ) !

    Have you guys gone off of Fitwell’s sizing chart?
    Anyone willing to help?
    Thanks!

    in reply to: Divide splitboards #678018
    Skijor AK
    Participant

    @rughty wrote:

    @Skijor AK wrote:

    I wish DPS would make a split. http://www.evo.com/skis/dps-wailer-112rp2-hybrid.aspx

    Check out the camber to early rise rocker profile! http://www.dpsskis.com/en/wailer-112-rp-314.html

    Take their ski shapes and make em wide! I am tired of seeing “split” versions of resort boards.

    Furberg is close.

    That camber to rocker profile isn’t really much different than the industry standard. as many have said already…I would certainly like to see more thought and testing of the board shapes we see in skis. Somebody make it please so we have something other than speculation to talk about?! :thumpsup:

    With reverse side-cut?

    in reply to: What pack do you use? #654771
    Skijor AK
    Participant

    My wife has the Osprey Variant 37 pack. I think this pack is awesome! Small enough to be a day pack, big enough to do a few days/ cabin trip in.

    I want the same one BUT with a vertical carry option!

    I want a pack that has:
    1. A-frame and vertical (snowboard) carry options.
    2. 32-40 liters
    3. Loose lid (I carry a rope sometimes)
    4. Crampon/shovel area.
    5. and is not the Osprey Kode.

    Is it impossible to have both a vertical carry and a crampon pocket? Say it isn’t so!

    (Something like this http://www.sierratradingpost.com/ortovox-peak-ii-42-alpine-backpack-ski-carry-system~p~2908u/)

    Any suggestions?

    in reply to: Divide splitboards #678016
    Skijor AK
    Participant

    I wish DPS would make a split. http://www.evo.com/skis/dps-wailer-112rp2-hybrid.aspx

    Check out the camber to early rise rocker profile! http://www.dpsskis.com/en/wailer-112-rp-314.html

    Take their ski shapes and make em wide! I am tired of seeing “split” versions of resort boards.

    Furberg is close.

    in reply to: 2014 AK Snow Photo Journal #678156
    Skijor AK
    Participant

    I was at Hatchers on Thanksgiving too! It was probably the best day I have ever had in the snow.

    Hit me up if you want to go out this winter! I am in Anchorage but usually have Friday – Sunday free. If the front range gets some snow I would love some night/after work laps too!

    in reply to: Winter Camping from a Vehicle #677799
    Skijor AK
    Participant

    My wife, my german shorthair, and I sleep in my 2001 Subaru Outback during Chugach winters. We just follow the snow in Alaska for x-mas and spring break, so a week at a time in-between Anchorage stops. The car-top storage is a must for our skis and boards (and gas cans incase of blizzards!). I also have a bunch of tarps to set up a canopy type system for cooking with the hatch open. A battery powered car starter/jumper is also a must. So is a smartphone. We were sleeping at Thompson Pass during the “Damalanche” but fortunately checked the forecast in time and got out of there.

    We don’t use extra insulation but bring multiple sleeping bags, blankets, and fury friends. Towels are a must in the mornings as the inside of our windows are usually soaked. We have an insulated kennel for the days where the pooch can’t come (moderate avalanche, or powder).

    The nice thing about this system is that skinning up a sketchy mountain is more comfortable than our camp!

Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 28 total)