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Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 608 total)
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  • in reply to: Splitboard Tuning Advice #879590
    Scooby2
    Participant

    Hi Travis,
    If you are managing this site now, I’m not sure it can get going again without the ability to host images. Myself and others went through crazy hoops to get images into posts. It was so much easier to do so with other social media sites. Those sites still lack the community feel though and don’t feel like an online “neighborhood” like sb.com did.
    Have a great winter,
    Dave

    Scooby2
    Participant

    oops, I’m not sure if those screws are M5 or SAE 10/32 thread, I only have M5 stuff.

    Scooby2
    Participant

    These are also available at bike shops, I think the standoff grub screws to adjust how far your bicycle brake levers go back are the same M5 grub screws. I presume they’d be stainless.

    Alternatively there are some very low profile head M5 screws that you could thread up from the base through the existing inserts, just countersinking the head against the existing insert, but that is the hard way I think.

    I have bags of the grub screws and nuts if you want a few, but I’m in Utah. maybe you are in Europe?

    Scooby2
    Participant

    Hey lernr,
    I would avoid base drilling, so 1995 right,

    You could get an m5 threaded grub screw, put some epoxy in the threaded hole and set the grub screw in then bolt from the top using a nut. I would think there would be enough grab left in the threads that with some epoxy you could have a strong post.

    McmasterCarr has them (threaded grub screw M5) get the hex head, pick your length. I think most boards except Rossignol use an M5 with the 0.8 thread pitch.

    in reply to: Legit sales site? #878607
    Scooby2
    Participant

    I doubt it, but hey you were able to start a new thread here on sb.com! who knew 🙂

    in reply to: This place needs a POST! #878337
    Scooby2
    Participant

    https://www.fischersports.com/bcx-traverse-waterproof-3022?c=2311

    . . . Current 22-23 product that has caught my eye and imagination. The liner is attached to the shell like a hiking boot or old K2 Yak. A flat-folding minimalist highback binding for descent could be fun with them.

    2lbs, probably under $300. No Narrow racing shell. Probably not strong on a challenging traverse, but would have its place on deep trail breaking days and non-technical skin tracks.

    in reply to: This place needs a POST! #877951
    Scooby2
    Participant

    About this site, I can’t link photos the way I used to with Flickr or start a topic. hope you all see more snow in March!

    in reply to: This place needs a POST! #877943
    Scooby2
    Participant

    I like the Key Equipment two stage forward lean, I’m not sure why the fabric on the tongue on the outside, does this hold an additional pad on the inside of the tongue? I like the price, I’m not sure if they are grilamid or regular ski boot plastic. It’s hard to find much info about the fit of the Hagan, Movement other brands that use this mold in english. My interest in trying boots that I can’t try in a shop has lowered a lot.

    in reply to: This place needs a POST! #877942
    Scooby2
    Participant

    LOL!

    Splitboard.com IT’S ALIVE!

    I couldn’t log in this fall

    in reply to: Trab Gara titans #864611
    Scooby2
    Participant

    I have been riding these Trab Gara toes this year, not that much due to the bad structure for much of the year.

    They do work with the Spark adapter plates however the screws need some hands on work to settle perfectly in the binding frame-perhaps not necessary or only needed for the front two screws. The head diameter of the screws for the Spark plate is a bit big and has to be ground down to just under 8mm. The best way to do this is to put the screw into a drill press and hold a file to the head until it is the smaller size. An alternative would be to put the screws in a drill and stabilize the drill in a vise or under clamps and hold a file to the head that way.

    Some of my favorite tours involve breaking trail up across some steep slopes eventually and I am into having a binding that can release me if needed. A breakaway leash is a must really as you will step out of an unlocked binding now and again. You will want to lock them in on firm snow edging. My partner’s bindings need a shim to tighten up the lock, but we haven’t tried the new broader base full size shim which might provide for a tighter lock (and longer customized screws).

    If you don’t really care about release from tour mode, other bindings are probably easier to use, easier to get in, perhaps more bombproof lock. If you want your sticks off in a slide, these seem to be the only option other than maybe the Pierre Gignoux carbon ones which maybe only work with boots that have a V-notch for easier stepping in.

    I think it’s time for splits to have an aluminum mounting plate like boards had in the 80s.

    in reply to: Fischer Traverse Carbon – Review/Thoughts #862968
    Scooby2
    Participant

    I’ve ridden these boots a fair bit now. I’ve switched the Voile straps from the xl to the regular ones because the xls were too stiff. I have two regular straps on each cuff now. Also one xl strap over the instep just above the boa dial on my back foot since I ride it really loose sometimes.

    Amazing thing about these boots is zero style adjustment from softies. I’m riding them generally softer than my many season soft boots which I never laced up on the top 2 of 3 cuff hooks anyway. I buckle one voile strap snug against the cuff and the other with about an inch of play before it kicks in. You need the little plastic strap holders to hold the voile strap at a given setting.

    I have also strapped them up tight and they are like hard boot carving boots on groomers. Crazy adjustablility in one boot. Still a little front foot cramped for my D-E forefoot, but since there is plenty of room in the cheap liners they came with, they should get some space eventually in the current liners w/o a punch. Current version of these boots are the Travers GR in the $400 range at some places, but new (more dense) liners are pretty much necessary imo.

    in reply to: Hey look we have a fan club! AKA David Gottorff is a douche. #862967
    Scooby2
    Participant

    Yes some folks are stuck on the same trajectory. Karkis’ 2013 breakdown of this type you meet in the bc is spot on though.

    My wife and I splitted up a literally 300 vert, 20 degree hill next to my neighborhood two weeks ago. 20-something guy (30s?) with his gal at the top of the mini-skinner tells me “oh you saw the track and couldn’t resist, eh”.

    Wow, man like how did you ever find this line?

    I’d go back to slowshoes and ascent skis if our mountains were empty again like the 80s and 90s, but that’s not a healthy way to think either. Plenty of room still anyway.

    cheers

    in reply to: Scooby2: Damaged sidewall ultracraft split #862534
    Scooby2
    Participant

    There are ski shops that will do that kind of surgery; at least to replace the edge, fill the base side and cover with a new ptex patch, probably in the $200 range.

    I think that board has poplar on the rails, poplar without a lot of fiberglass on it will compress a bit compared to maple, birch, black locust etc.

    in reply to: Scooby2: Damaged sidewall ultracraft split #862533
    Scooby2
    Participant

    Hi there, and ouch!

    Right now I’m working pretty late at the day job, fighting for weekends, so I wouldn’t be able to turn a project around within this season. If the base is not distorted very far across the board, much of the board’s strength may be intact. I am guessing ski shops are saying no because the damage extends past just the sidewall into the core, maybe an inch or so.

    I took the ptex off of an ultracraft once, added a bunch of carbon back in, epoxied new ptex on and had it ground. It looked great, but exploded again after a handful of tours. This board had a cracked core though, most of your core may well be intact, but it does have a weak point now.

    I’d get some epoxy, warm it so it flows well and try to get as much in the cracks as you can (twist the cracks open a little with a small screwdriver) to seal it up from water and ride it till it says no more.

    in reply to: Help choosing my first splitboard #861848
    Scooby2
    Participant

    I agree strongly on sizing up, but was not going to preach. Sounds like a solid deal there.

    in reply to: Help choosing my first splitboard #861775
    Scooby2
    Participant

    I think that Burton board is pretty heavy. I’d rather ship a Voile Revelator from the US with VAT than go that route. maybe buy bindings quick, they are hard to find this year (in the US anyway)

    in reply to: Fischer Traverse Carbon – Review/Thoughts #858275
    Scooby2
    Participant

    I was a pretty big fan of the K2 Ace 20 years ago, releasable highback, rigid sole, enough body to the uppers that you could ride w/o highbacks in good powder, BUT they weighed almost 5 lbs a boot.

    So these boots that I have finally gotten around to are my attempt to make a lighter version. I have sized up and am using a pretty stiff older model of scarpa/intuition liner. This was one of the cheaper versions of the Fischer Boot. Its liners definitely let me feel where the edges of the shell and the top of the highback were. This might have been related to sizing up. With the more dense foam liner i have added a bit of weight, but no pressure spots.

    I didn’t soften the lower cuffs of the main part of the boot since at this point I did not want to have to cut through the gaiter. The Scarpa liners do limit the rearward mobility, but there is still a much wider range than an average soft boot.

    Following Jan’s lead last year I tried it with the XL size of Voile Strap. I attached them with aluminum screw together rivet things. I’m not sure the wider/thicker straps were necessary. Three tight straps is probably as stiff a forward lean as I would want. I did that on the front foot boot. The adjustability of flex and where you want the flex to start is very adjustable across three straps. For the back foot I used one low stretch wide velcro strap down low, that I will probably leave some play in, and a single voile strap on the upper cuff.

    I’m pretty interested in trying them now. The boot is just a hair above 2.5 lbs. in a 29-29.5 shell. I’m dropping a pound per foot, more if you consider the binding in the pack on ascent.

    It doesn’t seem obvious that I need an instep strap yet since the ski boot liner I used compressed pretty tight into the smaller volume shell.

    I think this boot is a good affordable option if your feet are regular to narrow, the easy moldability of the Phantom/Backland or a different boot might be safer for wider feet.

    I have plenty of the rivet type bolts for the straps if anyone is interested.

    in reply to: Splitboard AT systems – Lower the stance #856281
    Scooby2
    Participant

    Do you mean that the touring tech toe piece wont let you move your front foot back. You could look at the new Voile touring toe piece which might allow better clearance. Otherwise install quiver killer mounting inserts in board farther back.

    in reply to: Women’s Waist Width Questions #849263
    Scooby2
    Participant

    hey there,
    I have done a bit of fitting of boards for my wife and daughters, if you are a womens 7.5, being a 24.5cm foot, a 25 cm wide board will make your feet tired fast when riding on firm surfaces or long toe side traverses on exit roads etc. You could get a way with that width if you rode generally only ride in good powder (Utah or interior BC) type nice and soft conditions; but I’d recommend a board right at 24cm (or a bit less) for a women’s 7.5 for more comfortable/powerful edging and more stability in rough snow.

    in reply to: Amplid Milligram #848147
    Scooby2
    Participant

    -ahhh, taking a break from the world here.
    I think with gear that does not involve wood, it’s just marketing. Or the first months of production goes out and the failure rate is higher than anticipated so material thicknesses are increased.

    I have had mostly paulownia snowboard cores that are as much as 300 grams different in a 164cm within the same shipment of wood but different trees (from S. Carolina). Poplar (Yellow) and balsa vary lot also. I think with a highly automated process and pressing at high psi, there is probably very little variation in the amount of resin in a manufactured board. I think weight growth in a board is probably due in part to wood, and in part probably due to adding some more fiber to reduce failures and warranty rates in light gear. Hopefully the extra grams means you wont crack the board in a dip in touring mode.

    Splitboard manufacturers have been slow to recognize that like a ski, a split needs a thicker core than 7 or 8mm for touring which is basically skiing with all weight on one foot in terrain dips, or just more composite reinforcement on the deck side in the center. Skis have like 10-13mm thick cores and usually a big patch of fiberglass and commonly denser wood under the binding area. To compensate for the stiffness this results in, bc boards just need to lose the camber in my opinion.

Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 608 total)