Skip to main content

Forum Replies Created

Viewing 20 posts - 381 through 400 (of 412 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • in reply to: VOTE PLEASE: Burton DriverX or Salomon Malamutes? #591601
    SchralphMacchio
    Participant

    bumpy … my old K2 Raider boots are destroyed. What’s the experiences with durability on the DX’s and the Mals? Wondering if any of the concerns have been justified.

    in reply to: Pyramid Peak, CO, Landry Route 4/18-19/08 #605602
    SchralphMacchio
    Participant

    FKNAwesome!!!

    So glad to see a SB.com member hitting the Landry Line. That is some gnarly shit, well well done. An inspiration for sure dude.

    in reply to: The Magic Hour…..A Cascade Sunset TR 4.1.08 #604998
    SchralphMacchio
    Participant

    Simply gorgeous. Great photos Tap.

    in reply to: Tahoe folks: where is this? #605043
    SchralphMacchio
    Participant

    I should have given you a ring, Jimw.

    Did Carson to Kirkwood yesterday. Gorgeous, but damn that cold wind early in the morning sucked and made for some shitty south facing crust. Got some nice packed powder turns coming into Emigrant Lake though.

    in reply to: TR: PNW March Madness… #604927
    SchralphMacchio
    Participant

    holy stoke batman! Glad you had a sickter day. Now repeat what Jim said!

    in reply to: Effective edge vs. grip on steep icey snow #604488
    SchralphMacchio
    Participant

    I’ve also always felt more comfortable in steeps ~47 degrees and up on a shorter board as well. Mainly because of Jon Dahl’s point – less swing weight to manage in a narrow couloir. Easier jump turns and quicker swivel turns.

    Regarding edge pressure – man I’d say tuning makes a bigger difference than running length at that point, but that’s just my unqualified opinion. Also, the other funny thing about steeps is the relationship between camber, sidecut, and flex. I agree that more sidecut is not something I like on the really steep stuff. I tried a Custom X in some steeps a few weeks ago and didn’t really like the feel of the deep sidecut, big camber, and flexy-flex when in steep chutes – my go-to board for that kind of terrain is a Burton T6, though I’m sure there are many boards that are good for that kind of stuff.

    I got nothing to add when it comes to factory split options though.

    in reply to: DIY split, the dream is over. Fix advice? #604129
    SchralphMacchio
    Participant

    so, my friend makes skis as a hobby (and possible business) and he hooked me up with some sweet clamping and a special type of epoxy resin he made for his skis. Then he cleaned up the holes and dropped in helicoils to assure that the wood would not fail. Next up we dripped in some wood glue to the helicoils to ensure water-seal and re-mounted the binding pucks. I’ll see how it rides soon …

    Anyway, I’m pretty sure burton was right about the Burton inserts. The heat from cutting – and especially the way I did it with an abrasive wheel instead of a ripping blade – heated the epoxy holding the topsheet to the board to well above it’s Tg, and probably started breaking down the cross-link bonds in the material. Our theory is that this was the source of the delamination, and then once the topsheet went it didn’t take much force from carving to pull the screws up out of the holes.

    Hopefully it holds the rest of the season!

    in reply to: DIY split, the dream is over. Fix advice? #604127
    SchralphMacchio
    Participant

    @burton wrote:

    the heat at your speed cutting kills your board…

    notice – a burton DYD split need s a slow hand … first drill the insert s in more than 2 , 3 steps out . slow slow wait any time -cool dow and cool it with water …

    burton

    Oh believe me, I know. Big mistake that I learned firsthand. It f’ed up the Ptex in the base, but hey it still rode fine until the delam.

    Next time I’m using a different blade, backing off on the inserts, and going much slower.

    in reply to: DIY split, the dream is over. Fix advice? #604122
    SchralphMacchio
    Participant

    good advice mumbles … but do you think I could try to epoxy the delam before doing the T-nuts? Just curious what your (and others) thoughts are about the order of this.

    -SchralphMacchio

    in reply to: Backpack review – TNF Off Chute #603846
    SchralphMacchio
    Participant

    I’ve been pretty pleased with this pack.

    I keep backup goggles and sunblock in the outer goggle pocket, and that works well. The shovel pocket *just* fits my BD companion shovel but I like how it fits in there and it’s easy access. Probe sleeve = awesome, fast access and fits a 3m large diameter probe just fine. Hydration pocket and sleeve are great, it even comes with a clip to clip your hydration bladder in place. Both vertical and horizontal carry are awesome. Safety whistle in sternum strap buckle is a great feature in all TNF packs now.

    Now here are my minor gripes:

    -hip pocket, waaay too small. I have a TNF skate-daypack with a hip pocket twice the size and one that doesn’t stretch the outer fabric once I have shit in the pocket and I buckle up. That thing is supposed to be for digicams, and it will only hold the smallest ones on the market – not without stressing them to the point where you’re concerned about breaking it. I’ve put my small cam in there a few times and now I have a hole from the fabric being stretched out and abraded (tree branches, icey snow, etc).

    -radio pocket on left shoulder strap, again WTF? The only radio that can fit in there is maybe the tiny Cobra model. My CELL PHONE is one of the smallest on the market and barely fits. I keep my folding knife in there and it works fine.

    Okay here is a major gripe –
    The external shovel handle strap completely ripped off after only 20 days of use on the slopes. Now, I know I’ve been hammering the pack with every hoist and beater, but still. They didn’t seem to design enough room with any pocket or buckle mechanism – too many things too small. The D-handle barely fit within the buckle and after enough stressing from lugging the pack around and starfishing in powder it ripped off. I think it could have been better designed.

    Going to TNF store later today – I hear they have repair in San Leandro which is really close to where I live.

    in reply to: making my split. #603149
    SchralphMacchio
    Participant

    @spxoo wrote:

    I didnt even think of their stupid insert pattern until i started hitting them with the saw. I used a jig saw, the cut inserts and all came out well, better than expected.

    Hah, I made the same mistake with my Burton Supermodel, but the inserts destroyed my saw and I had to switch to an abrasive blade. Next time I’m using this metal cutting circular saw blade called the “Metal Devil” from McMaster that has enough of a pattern to clear wood chips as well.

    @spxoo wrote:

    A big question i have will come when I get to choose the stance. Before cutting the board i rode on the furthest apart inserts. I think the board is made for pipe, so it is a little centered. The board has a lot of tail, way more than the other board i ride (157).

    I wanted to move the stance back maybe a 1/2′-1″ but after second thought. I was thinking that maybe going outside the factory inserts might seriously mess with the geometry. Any thoughts?

    I originally mounted in a near-centered stance and it was horrible in powder. I guess it depends what your needs are, but I’d tend to say setback for BC riding. I ended up re-drilling and re-mounting mine.

    It’s good that you’re thinking about this now before drilling it wrong! Good luck.

    in reply to: 2/24-25/08 #603965
    SchralphMacchio
    Participant

    sweet ripping, great TR. Monday’s conditions should have been schweeeet!

    in reply to: TAHOE ’07-’08 #598372
    SchralphMacchio
    Participant

    @jimw wrote:

    Sunday we went to the Heave. Firebreak was awesome! You could just point it and haul ass, and get amazing pow turns. In fact, you pretty much had to point it and haul ass or else you’d get stuck.

    Good god that stuff in Firebreak was heavy. I was hearing that the storm hit upside down, 19% windloaded on top of 12% snow. Yup, you pretty much had to point it. Which can be cool sometimes, but it was a lot of effort for a modest amount of goods. After we split up, SF and L2R and I headed over to Avy Bowl on the California side for steeper, more rideable (it seemed less heavy there) snow and much faster laps. It was delicious and fun. Riding in the trees was a mandatory for visibility later in the day. Then we heard thunder claps … and though we were below treeline, all of our legs were fried so we decided to call it. So much for the hot tub party eh?

    So yesterday (2/26) I wet catboarding on the terrain behind Squaw Valley and Sugar Bowl. Basically, if you’re at the top of Granite Chief looking at the valley behind Squaw, all those little alpine bowls are private property where Pacific Crest Snowcats run a cat operation. The trip was a bday present from all my buddies. My camera ran out of batteries after only a few shots, but if I get photos from the other people in the group I’ll put up a TR.

    Back to the point of the thread – I was seeing the start of sun crust formation on many aspects. Where the trees were exposed to sun and heat, pollen was starting to stick to the suncrust, forming that crackable velcro snow that is so horrible to ride. The only rideable stuff was north facing aspects.

    On north aspects, the snowpack had settled out to a pretty even density on the upper 65 cm before hitting a different layer of older stuff. Bonding felt good with density increasing deeping in the snowpack, and somewhere down toward the bottom we found some sugar that was starting to round out.

    The riding was good – heavy heavy snow, pretty much mandatory to be really setback on the board. No crusts on northern aspects yet though, fun powder turns still to be had in some places …

    in reply to: Avy I Class, Lake Tahoe, ~$26 #594735
    SchralphMacchio
    Participant

    As the ultimate BC beginner, let me chime in my feelings from the course I took in January.

    1) It’s impossible to beat the price. Even if all we did for 3 days was tool around with beacons, it would have been worth the money. That said, it was obviously much more intensive than that.

    2) The course is a survey course. It covers hazard evaluation, trip planning, travel techniques to an extent, and rescue. It did not make me a competent expert in any of the these areas, nor did I expect it to. I considered it a hands-on primer.

    3) The rescue scenarios were reasonably complex and in that sense it was helpful to get beacon and probing practice under pressure. We were able to take away some key points from what we could have done better in our rescue, and what we were doing well.

    4) I felt like shoveling was under-emphasized in discussion and practice when going over rescue scenarios. If avy debris really does set up to 40-60% water content then not only is it freaking heavy (3-5 pounds a gallon) but it is supposed to be hard as all hell. Understanding and emphasizing smart shoveling (as it can be the longest portion of a successful rescue) is key!

    5) I had a lot of fun with the hands on stuff though. We headed out to the Red Lake parking area and did tromped about looking at snowpack depth, wind, and learning how to use our senses to evaluate clues.

    6) Bret Hackett and Ryan McPartland are good hands-on guys, but they’re not science geeks so don’t expect a lot of talk about vapor transfer in metamorphism, etc. These guys rely on a combination of prevailing schools of thought, experience, and good sensibility for their decision making. Their instruction style is built from this background.

    7) Overall navigation skills and their impact on route selection and planning are outside of the scope of this course. That meant that once we were in avalanche terrain, it was more about looking at the contours to find the most sensible ways up and down.

    Overall, thumbs up, it was fun, met some cool people, did some cool exercises, learned some important things. As they like to say, “it is the beginning of my lifelong avalanche apprenticeship.” I should never forget who is the student and who is the master.

    in reply to: West Coast Split Party #597634
    SchralphMacchio
    Participant

    I got reallly lucky with the knee man! – very light sprain of my MCL (which was originally seriously injured 8 years ago) and a fat contusion on my hammy tendon (that’s already healed). Basically as I fell, I twisted so much that the inside of my right knee (at the hammy tendon) hit my left binding and bruised it HARD. The initial pain and contusion I mistook for a hamstring tendon tear, but the doc cleared me to ride. A lot of icing helped and I’m good enough to ride, though I can still feel the MCL walking down stairs. I’m not doing enough rehab on the bike, but I can still ride the board … got 5 days on the snow since then!

    I should be in decent fitness for a medium exertion tour by then. Sheesh, during my avy class I got more sore in my ankles than in my knee while skinning around uphill! Guess I’m looking into hardboots this summer …

    I am definitely pro splitting up into groups, since big groups are tricky and dangerous in BC for a whole lot of reasons.

    Anyway, all sounds fun, and I’m stoked about your beginner’s tour! It reminds me of the beginner rides I used to host on the cycling team to teach the new kids the basics of safety, communication, riding in a pack, showing people the routes, etc. Basically all the same stuff applies here 😀

    in reply to: West Coast Split Party #597632
    SchralphMacchio
    Participant

    Tex, I’m interested but can’t commit to 99% being-in just yet.

    Sounds fun, if you don’t see any reason why a split and BC newb shouldn’t be heading on a trip like this.

    in reply to: Here comes the base #601404
    SchralphMacchio
    Participant

    You guys read the avy report?

    6-9″ an hour, not counting loading? This thing is out of control!

    in reply to: Kooky Stance Angle Theories #601011
    SchralphMacchio
    Participant

    (continued thread drift)

    woohoo medically cleared! No tears in any ligaments or tendons at all, just a really irritated hamstring muscle that was protecting my knee from exploding!

    (back to your regularly scheduled programming)

    in reply to: Kooky Stance Angle Theories #601009
    SchralphMacchio
    Participant

    It’s definitely all about the knees as other people have mentioned.

    I was telling SF last week that last season I started switching it up between duck and freeride depending on the conditions and what I was trying to ride. I would go duck for a day tooling around in the park or hitting tight moguly runs, and then switch up to freeride for powder and/or wide open runs. I used to only ride freeride for years and on my smaller boards got as aggressive as +33/+21 (softboot) at one point. I figured that forcing myself to adapt my technique to the board setup would increase my ability.

    One thing I noticed is that in a ducked out stance (+18/-9) I have a tendency to bring my back (right) knee forward every once in a while, instead of outward. This wasn’t too good, but has generally been okay, up until Monday.

    On Monday I set up a board a ducked out goofy (I am normally the other way), trying to work on my switch riding. I was trying some 180’s on flat snow when I fell and as I was falling my upper (right) leg and knee went one way (counterclockwise) and my foot and board went the other way (clockwise). As I fell I felt horrendous pain and hyperextension – so much so that my knee looks bruised like someone kicked me or I hit something … but the bruise and blowing out capillaries was caused by internal forces.

    So I’m seeing an orthopedic specialist today and hoping I’ll be back in commission soon … BUT

    Something to think about when you’re working on your stance is to pay very close attention to your knees! It’s all about the knees …

    in reply to: homemade split: centered stance, oops #600679
    SchralphMacchio
    Participant

    Thanks for the advice climbingjunky … I actually read you guide for splitting the board and it helped a lot.

    Nonetheless I fugged up quite a bit but learned a lot for the next time!

    Now, to call Voile and see if I can get extra binding plate stickers …

Viewing 20 posts - 381 through 400 (of 412 total)