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Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 45 total)
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  • in reply to: Rider down – news reports Liz Daley killed in avalanche #677551
    prestonf
    Participant

    Sad news. She charged and was an inspiration!

    in reply to: ASTRONOMICAL SNOWFALL EXPECTED #630629
    prestonf
    Participant

    John, Kyle, and whoever else, I’m going to poke around xtal on wed. if you’re free.

    stoked!

    pm, call, etc.

    p out.

    in reply to: 17 nights snow camping, touring and boot drying #629431
    prestonf
    Participant

    Sweet!

    Intuition liners would be a must. I’ve never waterproofed my softboots with snoseal or the like, but maybe that would help a little?

    If you’re going on a self-supported expedition and moving camps, hauling sleds, carrying all of your own gear, and wanting to keep all of your toes, hardboots would be my choice.

    If you’re getting dropped off, setting up a well-stocked base-camp, and day-trippin’, seems like you could make softboots work if you really wanted to.

    I’ve never gone on an expedition, but I’m dying to. Have fun.

    in reply to: Mt Adams, N Face, NW Ridge #627980
    prestonf
    Participant

    That’s a proud line Russ. Good job. And don’t beat yourself up about a little side-slipping here and there. You gotta live in the moment and do what feels right to YOU at the time and get down in one piece.

    I like your enthusiasm, and it’s nice to see you guys with tools and harnesses, especially since you didn’t climb it first.

    But UTAH makes some good points. No reason to knock others, and I’m sure you’re beginning to realize that for every one of us that posts stuff on the interwebs, there are 50 that don’t. All those lines in your pictures of Rainier were shredded on snowboards a long time ago (lots of the climbing rangers over the years have been snowboarders). So while your buddies’ bindings look pretty nifty, they certainly aren’t necessary to get down gnarly stuff. (Now if somebody would make a proper BOOT, then we’d be getting somewhere…)

    Anyway, since you seem to be begging 😉 for history lessons, this is a pretty cool series:
    http://www.vbs.tv/watch/powder-and-rails-season-2–2/noah-salasnek-1of-2

    Early snowboarding ‘gansters’ where, of course, mostly rad skates. That’s just the history of the industry, and probably why ‘style’ is considered more important than function sometimes. Nothing wrong with that. But I wear form-fitting Arcteryx 😉 .

    Anyway, watch the whole series if you have time.

    Good job on the NFNWR.

    in reply to: Chiwaukum Ridge, Stevens Pass, WA #625968
    prestonf
    Participant

    Yea, it seems like the e. side has been spared the warm-ups. I bet the Colchuck area was good this weekend!

    in reply to: The Official Mt Baker Splitboard Festival thread. #620575
    prestonf
    Participant

    Well alright!!!

    If you’re coming from out of town, be mentally prepared for steep terrain and dd-eep snow!!! :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

    Some stoke from early November:

    http://vimeo.com/7651532

    Unfortunately I don’t think I’ll be around for the splitfest 🙁 .

    in reply to: Tax Day – Kendall Peak Area #617077
    prestonf
    Participant

    john tied in with a bowline on a coil so he could be on belay while he stomped around on that cornice in case it broke off behind him. It’s a way to tie into a rope if you have a rope but no harness. Not recommended though!

    http://www.brmrg.org/knots/FTL/coil.html

    (he was also the only one who remembered it.)

    We wanted to cut the cornice just to test stability since it snowed a bunch the day before and we toured up the back side and that line is pretty steep, etc. But basically we were just f@c*ing around.

    in reply to: Tax Day – Kendall Peak Area #617075
    prestonf
    Participant

    I guess we loosened up that cornice pretty good. Maybe it finally came down over the weekend 😉 .

    Way to point it.
    @jcocci wrote:

    in reply to: ***One Track Mind…again*** #614552
    prestonf
    Participant

    D-GREEN, that shot of the tracks in the volcanic ash is classic. Kinda reminds me of some of the weird stuff I’ve ridden through.

    You could make turns through the needles, just had to watch out for branches, trees, etc.

    After the first snows of September, the tops of the huge suncups hadn’t been covered yet on the bottom of the muir snowfield. Was still fun to ride.

    Ok, some normal ones:

    in reply to: One not-too-discussed classic descent factor #616281
    prestonf
    Participant

    Cascades:

    most of the good stuff around here requires a hike out, but there are some exceptions.

    Mt. Snoqualmie across the street from Alpental. 1400 ft couloirs on the backside with a 3000+ ft run down the phantom slide path back to the car.

    Mt. Rainier. Fuhrer Finger from summit to the Nisqually bridge. 10,000 ft. (I haven’t done this.) Paradise Glacier from Anvil Rock to Stevens Canyon road is about 5000 ft and over 3 miles of nice rollers (with a short skin at the base of the glacier; still pretty classic.)

    Washington Pass (Hwy 20) road shots rule. Cutthroat mtn, Whistler mtn, Kangaroo ridge, etc.

    in reply to: Avalanche in Japan, Full Burial #613779
    prestonf
    Participant

    Yea, count me in too. I’ve enjoyed snowsavage’s TRs and, especially, his rants. Cool pics are awesome, but a quality rant kicks it up a notch! It’s really interesting to see the terrain that people are riding in Japan, AK, and other more ‘exotic’ locales along with the ‘standard’ CA, UT, PNW, CO stoke. Our crappy conditions here have me pretty bummed, so it’s nice to see that others are getting on some bigger stuff. Maybe I’ll get on something decent sometime soon; in the meantime hopefully folks will keep posting…

    That video definitely had some insanity. I’ve never seen that footage of Sifredi absolutely ripping Everest in amazing conditions with Russell Brice spotting over the radio. YEA! There was some serious compression issues going on with Youtube, though, that made some of that stuff look impossibly steep. Anybody have those videos on a tape or dvd? They’re probably for sale somewhere on this site http://archive.tvmountain.com/index.htm
    but my french is a little, ah, rusty. Here’s a link to another old video from that site that’s got some craziness:
    http://archive.tvmountain.com/reportage/siffredi.htm

    I think those Chamonix guys used to use narrow alpine type snowboards for those ice routes? Probably not a fish or a khyber! I’m looking at a picture in the Feb 06 Transworld Snowboarding that has an article titled ‘The Disappearance of Marco Siffredi’ and there’s a picture of him on the summit of Everest the second time and he’s got some big-ass mountain boots on with over-gaitors of some sort and some strap bindings that look like they’ve been modified and have a 3rd strap. The board he’s on looks short and straight. Hopefully jimcoates from Chamonix will look at this thread again and can comment on what folks over there ride these days for those more committing routes that have ice lurking.

    In terms of soft boots vs hard boots for technical climbs, I don’t think anybody (well, except maybe bcrider 😉 ) is saying that soft boots are better for that type of stuff??? Steep snow climbs with crampons or low angle scambling they seem fine, but good luck climbing the type of terrain in this TR with soft boots that have a flexy sole. http://www.tetongravity.com/forums/showthread.php?t=150020
    That’s cool climbing terrain, but, well, kinda lame riding terrain! I also don’t think there are many people out there who ride AT boots who would say that they ride as ‘nicely’ or as ‘technical’ as soft boots. Disclaimer: 1) my Malumutes are stiffer than my 2 buckle Dynafit AT boots! 2) Spark bindings on a Mojo is a hella light setup. 3) Just bored, don’t really know what I’m talking about.

    Wew, long post. Good thread!

    in reply to: Paging Snoslut! #613600
    prestonf
    Participant

    I think he’s out of town for work. What did he do?

    Check your messages.

    in reply to: Roots and Branches #612918
    prestonf
    Participant

    Guye E. Face couloir this year fo sho…

    in reply to: what is good riding style? #608099
    prestonf
    Participant

    @bcrider wrote:

    @prestonf wrote:

    vid

    Looks like a fun line prestonf! 8)

    Thread drift…

    It was interesting to see you stomp on the snow and enter that on your toeside, I always feel more comfortable on my heelside in that same situation.

    I ride hard boots and feel like I have better edge control/feel on my toeside, so often like to enter and stomp on stuff that way, but if there are things to navigate through that you need to see, I definitely feel more comfortable on my heelside. Whatever works!!

    More thread drift…
    This is probably obvious, but I don’t think that stomping around is necessarily a good slope test. (In that video, we had cut a small cornice, but had approached from the backside, so didn’t really know what the snow was like…)

    in reply to: what is good riding style? #608095
    prestonf
    Participant

    I like this topic.

    I agree that “good style” is smooth and easy, yet powerful (ala CK). I think that Jeremy Jones often looks a little out of control because the stuff you see him riding on film is truly steep and on the edge of what’s turnable. That dude is smooooth on mellower pow slopes.

    I certainly wish my style was a little calmer and smoother, esp. in steeper terrain when I’m thinking about the possibility of going for a ride or getting sluffed out. I tend to stiffen up and my arms go all over the place. But hey, thinking and safety are good style in the backcountry 😛 . I don’t think that riding at the resort will necessarily train you in that regard, but getting out into the deep a lot might.

    Here’s a video of me “testing” a chute. It’s pretty obvious I’m a little sketched at the top, but after the first couple of turns when it’s clear I’m not going to end up broken at the bottom of the slope, I’m a little more at ease and fluid. That’s part of the fun of riding in the backcountry, though: the release after the stress. I just wish I rode better during the stressful part!

    vid

    I ripped the next chute over on our next run when we were more confident in the conditions, but there’s no video of that so you’ll have to take my word for it :wink:.

    in reply to: Splitbooting vs Rockboards #606202
    prestonf
    Participant

    Spicolli, I haven’t made it to the n. side of adams yet either. Maybe this year the weather etc will align? I wanted to head up there last year, but it never seemed worth it…I’ve been dying to take a look at the nfnwr and ride it in good condition (I get scared on ice). Looking for a partner??

    But, yea, I guess I tend to do me some split booting, mainly because I’m delusional and always hold out hope for a little sweet skinning action :?. But I also prefer kicking steps and wearing crampons in firm snow with my hardboot/split setup vs. softboots.

    in reply to: Splitbooting vs Rockboards #606198
    prestonf
    Participant

    Yea, depends on when you go; the times I’ve done the sw chutes there was still lots of snow down low and the trail was under a couple of feet; when that’s the case, most people traverse back over to the bottom of the normal climbing route…

    in reply to: Splitbooting vs Rockboards #606195
    prestonf
    Participant

    Some routes (like the sw chutes) require a skin out that would suck booting since the morning’s frozen corn has turned to knee deep mush.

    in reply to: Where to buy technical fabrics in the Bay area #606154
    prestonf
    Participant

    Not in the bay area, but seattle fabrics ships.

    in reply to: 5.3-5.4.2008 eastern sierra – black mtn. #605981
    prestonf
    Participant

    Sweet trip.

    @SanFrantastico wrote:

    Beauty shot.

    Hey, that’s cool, it kinda looks like Forbidden Peak in WA.


    From http://www.rhinoclimbs.com

Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 45 total)