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Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 358 total)
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  • dude_reino
    Participant

    Butler Gulch is a popular beginner/intermediate spot, and usually fills in earlier in the season. Below treeline is typically avy safe. You see a lot of hikers, snowshoers, dogs, etc. on the approach, but once you go vertical it is all skiers and riders. Laps are short but you can get a few hundred feet of nice open tree skiing.

    You mentioned Quandary. If you are talking about the east face (the main route), it is usually hard/windpacked and not great for riding. Read about the Cristo Couloir. I’ve never done it but it is a big spring line.

    Sky Chutes: I’ve done the ‘S’, in late spring, it is a great corn surf. But I wouldn’t dare go in there in winter.

    Above all i suggest and entire winter of skiing below tree-line before trying a Big-mountain line, and even then only do them in the spring. You need a LOT of experience (re: years) before going for Big lines in winter.

    in reply to: where are all the COLORADO front range go getters!? #668235
    dude_reino
    Participant

    @cometogether wrote:

    I bet! BP parking lot is a total shit show , from sledders, families, tourists, skiers, Christmas tree hunters, and a couple people who probably shouldnt be there all together.

    How does RMNP do this early? I see lots of talus and rock in summer so I think they would need a bit more snow unless you go up high…

    CP sounds like a nice escape from BP 😆

    I know some two-plankers who have been skiing the Park. They say its been good.

    in reply to: where are all the COLORADO front range go getters!? #668233
    dude_reino
    Participant

    @Norv wrote:

    For some reason people like to ride C.P. or RMNP. Still trying to figure that out…

    Because as crowded as CP gets on weekends, it is a ghost town compared to Berthoud!

    in reply to: Is it okay to skin on a established bootpack? #672769
    dude_reino
    Participant

    @Jason4 wrote:

    Dogs in the skin track aren’t a big deal for me yet. I don’t see enough out to really change the nature of the skin track and I’m usually pretty happy to see dogs out playing in the snow. I was out a week ago and saw a long haired dachshund jumping from one boot hole to the next in a boot pack. :mrgreen:

    Like any dog questions: dog-lovers don’t mind, dog-haters (aka evil people) will throw a fit.

    in reply to: Is it okay to skin on a established bootpack? #672768
    dude_reino
    Participant

    @Kyle Miller wrote:

    My real peeve is when people ski down the skin track now that is unacceptable.

    What do you mean? People skiing down the switchback part of the skin track? That defeats the whole purpose of earning turns. Not sure why anyone would do that.

    But skiing back to the car on the flats in the skin-track, I don’t think that is a problem. You need to keep up your speed. As long as you stop and step aside for uphill traffic.

    in reply to: Is it okay to skin on a established bootpack? #672762
    dude_reino
    Participant

    @acopafeel wrote:

    rarely do i feel the need to chime in on shit like this…

    booting on a packed skin track would be easier than wallowing through a bunch of freshies.
    skinning on a packed boot track might be easier than busting a new trail trough a bunch of freshies.

    so who cares? :doobie: Is it really going to slow your roll that much?
    i think everyone needs to quit being such weenies :nononno:

    I agree with you, but the attitude originated years ago with tele skiers who thought themselves above the snowshoeing class and relegated them into a separate trail, so as not to infect their oh-so-holy tele track with their filthy snowshoes…or something like that. :guinness:

    in reply to: Is it okay to skin on a established bootpack? #672760
    dude_reino
    Participant

    Bottom line is: if you find yourself skinning in an area where our more primitive knuckle-dragging relatives are booting, then you haven’t gone out far enough! :thumpsup:

    in reply to: Is it okay to skin on a established bootpack? #672752
    dude_reino
    Participant

    I no one is around I don’t see a problem. But one time I was in the cattle-train hiking up Highland Bowl and some ignorant woman was in the middle of it on her skins. She was so annoying, asking to pass everyone. Definitely not cool. If there isn’t enough open space to the side to pass, take the skis off and boot it like everyone else.

    in reply to: When does the Spring Break crowd hit Tahoe? #672627
    dude_reino
    Participant

    @Ecobrad wrote:

    Not that I’ve ever been, but if you want strip clubs take a shuttle to Reno. Getting a private dancer to come to your house is an option but as far as clubs go, SLT has nda mucho.

    The casinos in SLT should be fun during that time of year, assuming the snow’s decent and the white trash from the Central Valley and Bay Area are heading up in droves.

    No strip clubs on the NV side of SLT? That surprises me. We’ll pass on Reno…plenty of strips clubs back in Denver 🙂

    in reply to: When does the Spring Break crowd hit Tahoe? #672625
    dude_reino
    Participant

    Thanks Tex! We booked a house on Heavenly and have over a dozen guys, so we’ll probably just stay there in South Lake. Too much to organize a trip to Mammoth, etc. Plus we want to hit the casinos and strip clubs in NV. Any suggestions?

    in reply to: When does the Spring Break crowd hit Tahoe? #672620
    dude_reino
    Participant

    @Ecobrad wrote:

    I don’t live IN Tahoe but my advice is just to make sure you don’t hit it on a holiday weekend (MLK, Presidents Day, etc.). Spring break is usually late March/early April so you should be fine the first week of March. Are you looking for BC or resorts or both? North or South Lake?

    Congrats on getting hitched. Does she know what she’s getting herself into? :headbang:

    Resorts. South Lake, Heavenly because many of us from Denver have the Epic Pass so we ski free. Although if snow is good I wouldn’t mind driving up to Squaw. Never been.

    Oh, she knows….hehe.

    in reply to: best car for splitters? #656950
    dude_reino
    Participant

    911 Carrera 4 on Blizzaks with a ski rack :thatrocks:

    in reply to: Aspen-area / Roaring Fork Splitters??? #672234
    dude_reino
    Participant

    Hi Meng! I can’t really help you, since I moved out of the valley 5 years ago. I had a hard time finding BC partners up there. Valley people are a strange bunch. They tend to stick to their inner circles and not let others in. I even tried striking up chairlift conversations with people I noticed using A/T equipment, and they were very reserved on disclosing their ‘stashes’. The best success I had was going to the avalanche center fundraising events to meet BC people. Friggen’ Aspen. The exclusive attitude just runs down from the rich to the common folk :scratch:

    in reply to: Removing old glue and skin material from the board #671971
    dude_reino
    Participant

    Thanks. I’m looking for the least-invasive product that will do the job. I’ve always though acetone was safer than goo-gone, but maybe I’m thinking of ‘goof-off’.

    Yes, the plan is to hot wax it after I get the debris off.

    I’m going to start with soap & hot water and go up from there.

    in reply to: where are all the COLORADO front range go getters!? #668230
    dude_reino
    Participant

    I took a hiatus last winter but I’m looking to get back into things this time around. I’m a weekend warrior.

    in reply to: Do you switch your board halves when hiking? #661975
    dude_reino
    Participant

    The only answer to this debate is to always skin in deep pow 😀

    in reply to: Do you switch your board halves when hiking? #661969
    dude_reino
    Participant

    @powderjunkie wrote:

    i could see how someone could have a preference on what leg they prefer to hold (lower vs. upper).

    But, regardless of that, wouldn’t the straight inside edge hold/traverse better than the outside curved edge? :scratch:

    No. The whole purpose for sidecut is to allow for more edge control. Without sidecut, all of your weight is concentrated on the 30 or so centimeters of edge directly under your boot. But with sidecut, the ski bends to conform to the slope, and your weight is spread out across the entire 160 centimeters of edge on your board, thus allowing the entire edge to hold you to the slope.

    It may be difficult for long-time boarders to understand, but those of us who grew up skiing remember the invention of the ‘parabolic’ ski in the early nineties that pretty much changed the world of resort skiing and made icy slopes much safer to ski on.

    in reply to: Do you switch your board halves when hiking? #661952
    dude_reino
    Participant

    Better edge hold on steep traverses is all relative to which foot you prefer that hold to be on. Splitboards only have sidecut on one side of each ski so it is a trade off on traverses. With sidecut on the inside edges, your ‘lower’ ski has the sidecut and is keeping you from sliding down. If you don’t reverse the skis as intended, then your ‘upper’ ski has the sidecut, but your lower ski will slide.

    It’s all relative but most splitters prefer to have the lower ski planted on the slope for safety.

    in reply to: What are the ways to have an endless winter, and enjoy life? #660256
    dude_reino
    Participant

    You can have the most flexible job in the world but someday you will end up being claimed by a woman who will not be too happy with you off playing for 4 straight months. Enjoy it while it lasts, fellas!

    in reply to: Slide in truck campers #652746
    dude_reino
    Participant

    @Matt Wood wrote:

    What size truck do you have? I drove a friends old toy with one in some modest wind and it scared the shit out of me. I’d say go for it if you have a 1/2 or 3/4 ton.

    3/4 ton Powerstroke. The wind is a factor I didn’t consider. There are some that do have a lower ceiling that pops up. That may be better.

Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 358 total)