Forums Splitboard Talk Forum World Backcountry Freeride Jam
Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 22 total)
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  • #568771
    lesmennie
    13 Posts

    Just putting it out there. Wondering if anyone is planning on gettin out for this. I will be heading up on Friday and only staying the one day. Being new to splittin I hope to make some new friends. Here is the address with the details.

    http://www.whistlerblackcomb.com/todo/events/detail/backcountry.htm

    #595883
    Will
    377 Posts

    I can’t make it, but my Generation III splitter bindings will be there with the Prior guys. These bindings are built around the Ride EX binding parts, but are half the height off the board, twice as stiff, and save 312g (11 ounces) compared to the ride binding used with the slider track.

    Here’s a few shots of Gen IV:


    #595884
    rms56
    121 Posts

    Nice to see those Bent Metal parts. I’ve got a couple of pairs just waiting to be converted to you new system 8) 8) 8) 8) 8)

    #595885
    WClumberjack
    21 Posts

    so Will, is prior going to have your bindings at the demo tent or shop? are they going to start selling them or is that still in the works.

    #595886
    Ecobrad
    2068 Posts

    Hey Will,

    Did you change the slider pin design to eliminate the need for a cotter pin? Looks cool.

    #595887
    Will
    377 Posts

    My bindings will be in the Prior demo tent. They are still prototype sets, production sets for sale are coming this summer and fall.

    That is a new pin system Eco. I’m pretty stoked on them, one burly piece with nothing to break. They get held in with the toe strap whether you’re strapped in or not and there’s nothing to snag when you’re in touring or ride mode. The L-part makes a nice glove friendly handle for putting them in or taking them out. I haven’t leashed them in since they are pretty big, but you could leash them if you were worried about dropping them in the snow when transitioning. If you are unlucky enough to break a strap you could secure the pins to the bindings with a zip tie, twine or something similar.



    #595888
    snownskate
    140 Posts

    Those are looking pretty damn fine Will!! I don’t know what splitter would complain about ditching the crappy little Voile pin for a nice glove friendly one.

    I know these are protos, do you ever plan on putting in a rubberized footbed? I ask for a couple reasons. One, it seems like a smooth metal surface might ice up really bad and be kind of slick…and two, I have gotten really used to my Ride SPI footbeds (delta movements as well). They’re extremely kushy footbeds, specifically they have some gel in the heel and toes for impact and dampening, snow just brushes off.

    Signed,

    Concerned foot pansy

    #595889
    Will
    377 Posts

    I have put padding on one of my earlier protos, and it’s something that people ask about quite often. I plan on having the padding die cut with an adhesive backing which I will throw in the box with the binders. I’m of the opinion that my boots have enough padding for what I’m riding on the split, but once I decide to start bomb dropping to flat pavement I may change my mind 🙂 . The main thing I like about no padding is that the footbed is a little slick, so when I tighten my straps it sucks my boot securely in to the highback, where it stays. I’ve found with some padded baseplates that there’s too much friction between the boot and the padding, so your straps will seem tight when you strap in, then you get half way down a run and after moving around your foot goes to the back of the binding and now your straps are loose. No padding is also a little lighter.

    So yes there will be some padding thrown in which you can install if you want. I’ll probably roll without it. I haven’t had any more icing problems than I used to with the bare aluminum, but if you ride in different conditions than I do it might be an issue. It’s easy to clear the snow from the basplate as there’s nothing for it go get hung up on. Maybe a shot of pam or triflow in the morning would keep anything from sticking.

    #595890
    snownskate
    140 Posts

    The main thing I like about no padding is that the footbed is a little slick, so when I tighten my straps it sucks my boot securely in to the highback, where it stays.

    This is something I have never took into consideration, I’m so used to riding 50 yds. and retightening my bindings every time I go out….been doing it for years. I like the “optional wusspad” idea, I look forward to trying them out w/out the padding….I look fwd. to trying them out in the first place!

    #595891
    dishwasher-dave
    460 Posts

    Those Bent Metal/Spark Gen IV’s look awesome. Great work Will.

    #595892
    lewmt
    570 Posts

    it seems like a smooth metal surface might ice up really bad

    I rode the gen III in Jackson Hole for 4 days with no ice-up problems. The last day esp. was a perfect day for that to become a problem if it was going to.

    I have pads on the Rides I usually use with my split & couldn’t tell any difference in foot comfort – but – I’m not prone to hucking any monster drops

    #595893
    lonerider
    68 Posts

    @rms56 wrote:

    Nice to see those Bent Metal parts. I’ve got a couple of pairs just waiting to be converted to you new system 8) 8) 8) 8) 8)

    Yea, I have a set of Bent Metal Resins that I would love to convert to the system!

    #595894
    prior_rider
    109 Posts

    I will be taking my new split up to hopefully learn what the heck I am doing on it. They have a free clinic. I have never been a skier so I have had a somewhat difficult time learning skinning and ascending stuff that is a bit steep (35 degrees). I think the Randonee folks call the skill “setting an edge”. Whatever it’s called, I managed to damage mine already. I bought the Prior Backcountry at an end of season sale a while ago and thought it would be an easier learning curve than it has been. I have just had a hard time in moderate steep terrain with trees which is not at all uncommon.

    #595895
    Ecobrad
    2068 Posts

    @prior_rider wrote:

    I will be taking my new split up to hopefully learn what the heck I am doing on it. They have a free clinic. I have never been a skier so I have had a somewhat difficult time learning skinning and ascending stuff that is a bit steep (35 degrees). I think the Randonee folks call the skill “setting an edge”. Whatever it’s called, I managed to damage mine already. I bought the Prior Backcountry at an end of season sale a while ago and thought it would be an easier learning curve than it has been. I have just had a hard time in moderate steep terrain with trees which is not at all uncommon.

    😕

    #595896
    Shep
    525 Posts

    I’m pretty sure 35 degree climbs aren’t easy no matter what you are on… 😯

    #595897
    prior_rider
    109 Posts

    So a common destination around here that would make a nice use for a split would be to go to Camp Muir which is base camp on Mt Rainier. There are several places on that slog that are steep enough for me to think that I will likely opt to get out of the gear and just kick steps, rather than wallow in futility trying to do “kick turns” which is a challenging skill.

    Any tips on the steeper stuff? 35 degrees is the optimal slope for avalanche potential and also coincidentally, the most optimal /typical for enjoyable downhill riding / skiing.

    #595898
    Shep
    525 Posts

    I walked to Muir last summer, and I’m looking forward to the opportunity to do it on my split someday too. I remember the short sections with big step-ups that would be a pain in the butt on your boards… I don’t remember if there were convenient traverses to get across that stuff though. I say go for the kick turns there, as the snow should be reasonably soft, and you’ll need to develop the kick turn sooner or later anyway.

    Not being from the PNW, I don’t have any suggestions for places to go, but if you want to summit Rainier, there is some great ~30-35 degree stuff on the upper slopes. You get to trade your avalanche concerns for crevasse concerns. 😯

    Have fun!

    Shep

    #595899
    prior_rider
    109 Posts

    Thanks for the tips, the Kick Step is just something I need to practice on a day when I don’t have a larger objective. Basically using gear like a split board or AT ski gear is useful when it becomes more efficient than snowshoes or kicking steps in snow. Right now it is more efficient for me to do the latter until I get a better handle on how to efficiently ascend relatively short, yet steep sections. Practice Practice Practice.

    #595900
    snownskate
    140 Posts

    I think if I were to split to Muir I would just boot it up the normal trail until you hit the Muir snowfield proper and just skin from there as I think you make it past any of the real steep sections at that point.

    If you’re looking for trips to take around Seattle I would suggest anything around Snoqualmie pass, pick up Backcountry Skiing Snoqualmie Pass by Volken….there’s a plethora of routes of all different pucker factors in there w/ trailheads less than an hour from Seattle.

    #595901
    Will
    377 Posts

    We went in the Emmons Winthrop route last year on Rainier and skinned all the way from the dirt to Camp Schurman which you can check out here: http://209.97.214.134/talk/viewtopic.php?t=2581&start=0&postdays=0&postorder=asc&highlight=
    It was a pretty easy skin, and a long descent.

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