Forums Splitboard Talk Forum What’s north america’s best BC region?
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  • #669661
    powder hound
    23 Posts

    no brainer. eastside has the weather, the terrain, the steeps, the snowpack, the access, the lack of crowds/development. Pretty unlimited lines between Mt. Whitney and Bridgeport. You could spend several lifetimes trying to see/ride it all. seriously though Im talking lower 48. AK is a different experiance some of their best slopes average upwards of 1000 inches of POW per year!

    #669662

    no, it’s not good in alaska. there is too much darkness and no women. don’t come here at all. please. :mrgreen:

    #669663
    saign
    330 Posts

    Anywhere I’m not… :thumpsup:

    #669664
    maxpower88
    58 Posts

    @dunk wrote:

    i’m assuming eastside sierras? if so, why so?

    Morning….

    ….Afternoon

    @powder hound wrote:

    no brainer. eastside has the weather, the terrain, the steeps, the snowpack, the access, the lack of crowds/development. Pretty unlimited lines between Mt. Whitney and Bridgeport. You could spend several lifetimes trying to see/ride it all. seriously though Im talking lower 48. AK is a different experiance some of their best slopes average upwards of 1000 inches of POW per year!

    Oh yeah, and THIS ^^

    #669665
    powder hound
    23 Posts

    @maxpower88 wrote:

    @dunk wrote:

    i’m assuming eastside sierras? if so, why so?

    Morning….

    ….Afternoon

    @powder hound wrote:

    no brainer. eastside has the weather, the terrain, the steeps, the snowpack, the access, the lack of crowds/development. Pretty unlimited lines between Mt. Whitney and Bridgeport. You could spend several lifetimes trying to see/ride it all. seriously though Im talking lower 48. AK is a different experiance some of their best slopes average upwards of 1000 inches of POW per year!

    Oh yeah, and THIS ^^

    Yes, That too, bitches!

    #669666
    grubbers
    150 Posts

    The Duffy is definitely one of the best places I’ve ever been. Roger’s Pass is on the bucket list.

    #669667
    Scooby2
    620 Posts

    there’s your answer Giuliano, watch how the snowpack grows in different spots and you’ll probably see Alaska in late winter/spring is the place to be (short of some weird weather anomaly) if you are flying so far from Europe

    #669668
    mutantvan
    24 Posts

    Stay out of the PNW and BC! Awful! Realllyy!

    #669669
    barrows
    1490 Posts

    This is too EZ of a question, as the answer is obvious: Interior BC is the best, period. Best snow, endless terrain, long season, no crowds, reasonable avy conditions.

    The interior of BC is so obviously better than anywhere else in NA I am incredulous that anyone would even be able to suggest anywhere else.

    Alaska is a great place to visit, but the season, in reality, is short, and there is a definite lack of below treeline riding, making bluebird conditions almost mandatory for getting out. As opposed to interior BC, where one can storm ride 2K’ untracked tree lines forever…

    #669670
    peacefrog
    376 Posts

    @barrows wrote:

    This is too EZ of a question, as the answer is obvious: Interior BC is the best, period. Best snow, endless terrain, long season, no crowds, reasonable avy conditions.

    The interior of BC is so obviously better than anywhere else in NA I am incredulous that anyone would even be able to suggest anywhere else.

    Alaska is a great place to visit, but the season, in reality, is short, and there is a definite lack of below treeline riding, making bluebird conditions almost mandatory for getting out. As opposed to interior BC, where one can storm ride 2K’ untracked tree lines forever…

    Uhhh, uhhh, uhhhhh.
    You can’t classify “Alaska” like it’s one place. It’s like saying Canada. It doesn’t mean anything without more specificity. Where you come up with a short season and no riding below tree-line I have no idea. It’s almost like you don’t know what you’re talking about and have never liver anywhere in “Alaska”. True if you look only a heli than the season is really only Feb-April, but for me in Juneau (hardly snow central where Alaska is concerned) usually my season goes from late Oct. to June. Plus, most of my mid season riding is tree/storm skiing.
    I’ve always found your posts to be well reasoned and thoughtful. But after saying something like this it just shows me that you’re willing to comment “with authority” on things you don’t really know about.
    Guess I’m not switching to hardboots afterall

    #669671
    nickstayner
    700 Posts

    http://cookecitychronicle.blogspot.com/

    (check the archives of the winter months)

    #669672
    barrows
    1490 Posts

    @peacefrog wrote:

    @barrows wrote:

    This is too EZ of a question, as the answer is obvious: Interior BC is the best, period. Best snow, endless terrain, long season, no crowds, reasonable avy conditions.

    The interior of BC is so obviously better than anywhere else in NA I am incredulous that anyone would even be able to suggest anywhere else.

    Alaska is a great place to visit, but the season, in reality, is short, and there is a definite lack of below treeline riding, making bluebird conditions almost mandatory for getting out. As opposed to interior BC, where one can storm ride 2K’ untracked tree lines forever…

    Uhhh, uhhh, uhhhhh.
    You can’t classify “Alaska” like it’s one place. It’s like saying Canada. It doesn’t mean anything without more specificity. Where you come up with a short season and no riding below tree-line I have no idea. It’s almost like you don’t know what you’re talking about and have never liver anywhere in “Alaska”. True if you look only a heli than the season is really only Feb-April, but for me in Juneau (hardly snow central where Alaska is concerned) usually my season goes from late Oct. to June. Plus, most of my mid season riding is tree/storm skiing.
    I’ve always found your posts to be well reasoned and thoughtful. But after saying something like this it just shows me that you’re willing to comment “with authority” on things you don’t really know about.
    Guess I’m not switching to hardboots afterall

    Peace: I was not aware of any tree riding with substantial vert and adequate snow? You have tree runs around Juneau with good vert and good snow conditions there, how much vert?
    Also, how many hours of daylight do you have in December and January? Treeline in AK is at pretty low elevation, and I have not ever heard of any really good tree riding there.
    And, have ridden in the interior of BC much? Would you suggest that snowboard conditions around Juneau are superior in general on any given day?

    #669673
    peacefrog
    376 Posts

    Barrows
    I can give you Juneau specifics but that kind of defeats me point. My point is that you talk about the conditions in Alaska as a homogenous unit. BC is 364,764 sq miles. Alaska is 663,300 sq miles. You had some amount of specificity for BC (though not enough) but zero specificity for a state that is twice its size.
    In Juneau
    treeline is around 1,800ft-2,500ft
    snowline depends on the time of year but in winter I’s say 0-400ft.
    Average snowfall is 350″ (based on local ski hill’s website).
    Daylight
    Dec 21, 2013 8:45 AM 3:07 PM 6h 22m 30s
    Feb 21, 2013 7:13 AM 5:10 PM 9h 57m 03s
    Apr 21, 2013 5:29 AM 8:25 PM 14h 56m 44s
    Jun 21, 2013 3:51 AM 10:08 PM 18h 16m 31s

    For comparison Fairbanks
    treeline- sorry I couldn’t find it.
    snowline- Not Applicable (it’s always cold enough to snow fall though most of spring)
    Average snowfall is 69″ (yikes)
    Daylight
    Dec 21, 2013 10:58 AM 2:40 PM 3h 41m 29s
    Feb 21, 2013 8:27 AM 5:43 PM 9h 16m 04s
    Apr 21, 2013 5:52 AM 9:49 PM 15h 56m 13s
    Jun 21, 2013 2:58 AM (previous day) 12:48 AM 21h 50m 00s

    These are just two examples in a state that has five climate zones
    The climate zones are: (1) a maritime Zone which includes southeastern Alaska, the south coast, and southwestern islands; (2) a maritime continental zone which includes the western portions of Bristol Bay and west-central zones. In this zone the summer temperatures are moderated by the open waters of the Bering Sea, but winter temperatures are more continental in nature due to the presence of sea ice during the coldest months of the year; (3) a transition zone between the maritime and continental zones in the southern portion of the Copper River zone, the Cook Inlet zone, and the northern extremes of the south coast zone; (4) a continental zone make up of the remainders of the Copper River and west-central divisions, and the interior basin; and (5) an artic zone.

    Now I’m not going to tell anyone to make a bet on Juneau but it beats the hell out of Interior BC at least anything North of Prince George (AKA most of it). Where’s it’s sunlight is comparable to Juneau but the snowfall is 20″-80″. There are only rollings hills for the most part and the trees grow so close together you can’t really ride them anyway. Now if you’re talking the small (relatively) area around the Glacier National park: Between Jasper and the US boarder (north to south) and between Kamloops and Calgary (west to east) Than that will beat the pants off Juneau (depending on how important a maritime snow pack is to you). Now while the Glacier National park area may beat Juneau, I’m not willing to cede that it beats anyplace in Alaska. AK is just to big and while I’ve seen a fair amount of it I certainly haven’t seen enough of it to know if that this particular section of BC beats every single place in AK.

    I’m not saying Juneau is a Mecca, far from it. I’m saying you’re comments are so lacking is specificity as to be meaningless. If you want to comment of the places you know about do so.
    Do not, however, assume that just because you’ve rode on a few pair of hardboots that you know they beat every softboot. :duel:

    btw you know I’m just giving you a hard time right? Though I am technically correct (the best kind of correct)

    #669674
    TEX
    2486 Posts

    I admit I have never been to Alaska , but trans canadian 2 between revelstoke and Golden would be awfully hard to beat- major Interstae that is kept clear most of the time. The ability to ride under almost all weather conditions Trees, couloirs, big peaks . rodgers pass. rodgers pass rodgers pass.

    I would love to go to Alaska but as someone coming from outside the US the logistics would be more work. You may get better lines /snow. I cant say but if it beats rodgers pass rodgers pass rodgers pass it has to be great

    Hey, did I mention Rodgers pass?

    #669675
    UPGRAYEDD_2505
    127 Posts

    @TEX wrote:

    Hey, did I mention Rodgers pass?

    Well then at least get the spelling right, geez. 😉

    So many awesome spots in N. America…

    #669676
    TEX
    2486 Posts

    Thanks Upgreyed. Im getting old ….er older

    #669677
    barrows
    1490 Posts

    Yup, fully agreed with TEX, et al. Interior BC, Rogers Pass and vicinity, Selkirks/Monashees. This are also gives great access in spring to big time mountaineering lines in the Canadian Rockies: Robson, Bryce, etc…
    Ulimited snowfall, more pow than anywhere else, unlimited terrain choices…
    I think most folks on these forums understand the term “interior BC”! I would include a little further south as well, Kootenays, even down to Fernie, although it can be a little warm down there…

    #669678
    davidr
    102 Posts

    @peacefrog wrote:

    I’m not saying Juneau is a Mecca, far from it.

    interested to hear where you think is a mecca. or even confined to AK, where would the best place be to set up for a winter?

    #669679
    BGnight
    1382 Posts

    BC interior sounds neat and all, but I for one am not a fan of spending an entire season in considerable/high avy danger. Give me coastal ranges every day. I think it’s annoying to have huge mountains with breathtaking lines knowing that if you dropped any of them you’re most likely going to die.

    #669680
    HikeforTurns
    1113 Posts

    Definitely something to be said for that. It’s tough sometimes to pick the best location overall.

    Coastal is the shit because they get huge dumps, and its sticks to the steeps making for some really sweet lines. It can also be just as light as continental if it gets cold enough. And stability is awesome, with less to worry about like persistent weak layers. The downside is the weather can often skunk you, and rain isn’t much fun to ride on. And approaches are generally harder.

    Continental is sweet when you are shredding through a couple feet of blower. Also higher elevation can sometimes mean earlier/later snowfall for fall and spring pow skiing. Access is generally easier too with all the mining roads and what not. Snowpack on the other hand can be very complex and shallow. Blower doesn’t stick to steeps too well. Those are mostly ridden in april-june.

    Intermountain is an awesome combination of both of these things (jackson, revy etc.) with the addition of nice steep tree lines that don’t end with ice, cement or slush at the car.

    If you are after snow quality/consistency I think intermountain wins. You are more likely to have a higher number of really good days of riding. If you are after snow quantity/rideable safe terrain then the edge goes to coastal. You are more likely to ride the gnar mid-season.

    If you like blower and avalanche science, continental.

    Since I have to stay in the US, I would prefer to be in Northern Idaho, Alaska or Washington. Though the PNW can be a bitch for weekend warriors.

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