Forums Splitboard Talk Forum Weight of a modern splitboard setup vs AT ski setup?
Viewing 14 posts - 21 through 34 (of 34 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #633120
    Ecobrad
    2068 Posts

    Everyone’s kinda beating around the bush :disco: so I’llto put it a little more bluntly…you should be very near a black diamond resort rider/skier before you start going into avalanche terrain.

    As far as taking your dogs out, they need to be extremely well-trained plus you have to be very avy savy AND you HAVE to be an EXPERT rider. Spend a little time in the backcountry and you’ll see that the only riders having fun with their dogs have all three of those things above. Its a big responsibility taking dogs into avalanche terrain.

    If your not expecting to do anything over 30 degrees then none of this really matters that much.

    I can tell you that if your starting from scratch you’ll more than likely become a black diamond snowboarder before a skier. For the normal snowboard athlete I’d say spend at least three seasons in the resorts going at least 15 times a season before going out into avy terrain.

    The hardest thing to learn how to do in the backcountry is getting good at riding in all conditions. For example, it’s best to learn how to ride ice at a resort when falling has releatively minor risk compared to when your in the backcountry. The only way to get good in all conditions is REPS. That’s another thing that’s hard to get in the backcountry.

    Rant over.

    PS Skiers suck.

    #633121
    PowderNewb
    24 Posts

    Thanks for the tips, only places I plan to ride are maybe a 2 hr climb. Mostly seymour/cypress.

    #633122
    Ecobrad
    2068 Posts

    I don’t know those places but its not about how far away the mtns are, it’s about if your going into avalanche terrain. I don’t have time to tell you about all you have to know about avalanches but PLEASE learn A LOT about avalanches before making any decisions. I can’t emphasize enough how serious this stuff is.

    @PowderNewb wrote:

    Thanks for the tips, only places I plan to ride are maybe a 2 hr climb. Mostly seymour/cypress.

    #633123
    PowderNewb
    24 Posts

    I will certainly take Avy’ courses and plan to have all the proper gear. Regarding those two places, most people hike up and ski down to the parkinglot. Which on weekends probally see’s over 500+ ppl per day foot traffic climbing and perhaps at least 25 skiing their own trails back down to the parkinglot.
    The duration of the entire run currently takes me 3 hours up and down hiking. With skinning/skiing I’m thinking it would be much faster.

    #633124
    BlahBlahBlah
    21 Posts

    Maybe a bit off topic. Powdernewb not sure if you know Whistler Olympic Park (the Callaghan valley between Squamish and Whistler) has a big ‘Pooch Loop’ now. You can take your dogs up there and ski around on your xc gear. Could be a good way to get used to being in the snow with them.

    #633125
    utasidian
    120 Posts

    not to harp on the dog thing, but every year I get less excited about touring with them. Last year a buddy’s dog jumped into my line right behind me and ended up going under when the sluff went bigger than expected. Luckily the dog came out on top swimming way the fuck down the mountain, but I always feel sick watching a living disappear in an avalanche. Plus, I’d hate to be caught in something the dog had triggered. The year before I saw another buddy’s dog get killed by a semi-truck while we were skiing along the highway back to our truck.

    As for the original topic of this thread I’ve got agree with what’s been previously said. As a snowboarder for the last 23 years I’m willing to suffer a bit of weight penalty if it means I don’t have to resort to skiing. There is nothing worse than standing in a pair of skis looking at a line and thinking “if I was on my split I’d rip that.”

    #633126
    PowderNewb
    24 Posts

    Thats the plan, so far we’ve just been hiking up peaks, with them attached to my belt pulling me. Which is what i’d like them to do also when i’m on ski’s and they’d be off leash on the downhill.
    @BlahBlahBlah wrote:

    Maybe a bit off topic. Powdernewb not sure if you know Whistler Olympic Park (the Callaghan valley between Squamish and Whistler) has a big ‘Pooch Loop’ now. You can take your dogs up there and ski around on your xc gear. Could be a good way to get used to being in the snow with them.

    #633127
    ctowles
    81 Posts

    heres my setup, since someone asked. if you notice, i have pretty much followed the light is right mentality whenever possible, and since i counted the ounces, the pounds followed:

    board: 165 BC split w/ spark LT pins and brackets
    bindings: spark Blaze
    boots: burton Driver X
    poles: Black diamond alpine carbon cork
    Pack: Black diamond outlaw avalaung
    saw: DIY flicklock compatible (very light and small)
    shovel: Black Diamond transfer 7
    probe: life link carbon 282
    beacon: barryvox pulse
    snow study kit: life link crystal card, life link slope meter, BCA themometer, BCA loop, burton field book
    survival/repair kit: first aid, space blanket, waterproof matches 9 hr candle, map, compass, whistle, extra spark pin, cord, thinking about extra binding staps too

    jacket: patagonia light smoke
    puffy: OR fraction jacket or montbell ex light down (only 5 ounces)
    pants: patagonia guide pants
    base layers: patagonia capilene
    gloves: patagonia work gloves with kinco work gloves and OR paclite mittens/primaloft liners in the pack for spares
    goggles: smith phenom with smith anthems in the pack for spares
    helmet: sweet rooster carbon

    #633128
    PowderNewb
    24 Posts

    Whats the weight of your backpack with gear?

    #633129
    barrows
    1490 Posts

    I think some folks here are not making a real comparison. Comparing a split set up to lightweight AT set up is not the right comparison, as a snowboard will far outperform lightweight AT gear in any snow condition excepting perfect, consistent, powder. A valid comparsion would be a split setup compared to fat/lightweight AT set-up:

    Black Diamond MegaWatts, with Dynafit F-12 bindings, and Dynafit Zzero 4 boots

    The above is about the lightest AT setup that approaches the ability of a snowboard in terms of dealing with real world backcountry snow conditions. If one compares the weight of the above set up with a well setup split, one will find the weight to be comparable, with no appreciable disadvantage to the split in terms of weight.
    Lighter weight AT set ups will not perform as well as a snowboard on the down.
    Everybody has to carry the same weight in other gear in the backcountry, I fail to see how the weight of water, food, avy gear, etc. would be any different for an AT skier vs. a Splitter.

    #633130
    Jason4
    443 Posts

    Most of this thread is filled with insecure jerks trying to pump their egos.

    PowderNewb: It sounds like you’re starting from scratch and want to travel in the mountains in the winter and haven’t established a preference for how…is that close and do you want to know the most efficient way to get around or are you really looking for the lightest weight setup?

    The backcountry is the greatest place to enjoy the peace and quiet of the mountains. People have been skiing a lot longer than there have been lifts. Do you really think that there is a forum somewhere that tells mountain climbers and snowshoers that they need to be able to ride the chairlifts at a certain level before they can enter the mountains?

    Educate yourself before you go and try to get involved with a group of experienced backcountry travelers to learn from.

    There has been a little bit of good advice so far, the best that I saw is to rent some gear, I know the Glacier Ski Shop will rent an AT kit and you can spend a day to see if it’s the right thing for you.

    As far as going to cheap for find out…if you buy shitty gear, you’ll have a shitty experience, if you can afford to buy the best it will only make your time in the mountains better as long as you figure out what the best is for your application. Only you can decide how much it is worth spending and what you can afford.

    If I were in your situation I think I’d lean towards an AT setup. When I get back to the mountains I’ll put money into both an AT setup for the efficiency of travel and a split setup for the sheer fun of snowboarding and then I can do whatever I feel like doing that day and if the snow sucks I’ll ride my bicycle.

    Get out in the mountains, it’s the best thing you can do. I wish I could right now.

    #633131
    shasta
    143 Posts

    I had to overcome the geek factor this thread oozes to do what I did but:

    My new AT rig:

    Moment Bibby PRo’s and Marker F12=14.5 lbs

    vs.

    Venture divide with Voile Mountain Plates and hardboot bails=12 lbs.

    So don’t sweat the details just pick a tool and go ride.

    For all that profess the training required before one ventures into the b/c, I backcountry snowboarded before I ever rode at the park. That said don’t go without basic avy skills.

    #633132
    russman
    692 Posts

    @barrows wrote:

    I think some folks here are not making a real comparison. Comparing a split set up to lightweight AT set up is not the right comparison, as a snowboard will far outperform lightweight AT gear in any snow condition excepting perfect, consistent, powder. A valid comparsion would be a split setup compared to fat/lightweight AT set-up:

    Black Diamond MegaWatts, with Dynafit F-12 bindings, and Dynafit Zzero 4 boots

    The above is about the lightest AT setup that approaches the ability of a snowboard in terms of dealing with real world backcountry snow conditions. If one compares the weight of the above set up with a well setup split, one will find the weight to be comparable, with no appreciable disadvantage to the split in terms of weight.
    Lighter weight AT set ups will not perform as well as a snowboard on the down.
    Everybody has to carry the same weight in other gear in the backcountry, I fail to see how the weight of water, food, avy gear, etc. would be any different for an AT skier vs. a Splitter.

    Barrows, you just hit this topic on the nose!

    #633133
    rughty
    620 Posts

    @shasta wrote:

    I had to overcome the geek factor this thread oozes to do what I did but:

    My new AT rig:

    Moment Bibby PRo’s and Marker F12=14.5 lbs

    vs.

    Venture divide with Voile Mountain Plates and hardboot bails=12 lbs.

    So don’t sweat the details just pick a tool and go ride.

    For all that profess the training required before one ventures into the b/c, I backcountry snowboarded before I ever rode at the park. That said don’t go without basic avy skills.

    Nice to see Moment in the backcountry! Those guys are awesome and located right here in Reno.

Viewing 14 posts - 21 through 34 (of 34 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.