Forums Splitboard Talk Forum Weight of a modern splitboard setup vs AT ski setup?
Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 34 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #573884
    PowderNewb
    24 Posts

    I’m new to snowsports have only done some xc skiing was looking at getting some AT ski’s/skins more suited to the hilly terrian of BC/vancouer area. I’ve heard that the higher end AT gear is getting lighter than the telemark gear.

    Now that I have discovered splitboards, I’m just curious what a setup like zephyr venture(rugged do it all board) with karakoram/blaze (most up to date bindings) would weigh vs an AT ski setup?

    #633101
    PedroDelfuego
    758 Posts

    This is way to vague for any kind of comparison. If you want to compare did it yourself and post it for the rest of the world. Splitboards are heavy! You have to deal with that fact. Add all the ancillary gear (beacons,shovel,pack,camelback,skins,food,etc) and it gets real heavy.
    @PowderNewb wrote:

    I’m new to snowsports have only done some xc skiing

    The backcountry can be dangerous place and the weight or your gear should be one of the last things on your mind. We need to stop this madness on gear weight. This is not mountain biking. Do you know what weighs a lot? A coffin. :twocents:

    #633102
    Van Rider
    5 Posts

    @PedroDelfuego wrote:

    The backcountry can be dangerous place and the weight or your gear should be one of the last things on your mind. We need to stop this madness on gear weight. This is not mountain biking. Do you know what weighs a lot? A coffin. :twocents:

    Yah, because people can’t think about gear weight and avy danger at the same time. It’s one or the other. 🙄

    #633103
    Unruly Baker
    333 Posts

    See this:
    viewtopic.php?f=2&t=9261&st=0&sk=t&sd=a

    Pay special attention to the post by Zak on page 2. The hardboot set-up will get you near the AT guys for the up’s. I have both set-ups (hardboot with Dynafit toes and Spark Fuses with LT pins and Driver X’s) and use them for different tours on different boards and mix and match throughout the season.

    Different horses for different courses. But I may use them different that many would think, I actually use my hardboot set-up on powder days when I want to stay out longer and get more vert. I use my softboot for firm days where I want a forgiving ride in tough conditions. Of course there are exceptions, long days with lots of booting on firm snow may call for the hardboots as well.

    UB

    #633104
    paulster
    130 Posts

    I disagree with Pedro on the weight issue – I carry the same safety gear whether I am on my AT, splitboard, or Tele set up. I know I am a lot faster and happier on the uphill with my AT set up. There are a bunch of good AT options for 6-7 lb skis, 1 1/2 lb bindings, and 5-7 lb boots (per pair). I don’t know how light you can go with a new split board (a lot lighter than my Split Decision, I hope), but I would be stunned if anyone has a high performance ride that even comes close to that. Splitboarding has a lot of things going for it, but fast and light uphill ain’t one of them. The bigger question is do you care? Some do, some don’t.

    #633105
    PedroDelfuego
    758 Posts

    I think people who have never done a sport should go try it, see if they like and then worry about the gear. Once you fall in love with any sport/hobby you will then spent all the dough to get just the gear setup you like. Hypothetically wondering which setup would weigh more out of 2 different sports you have never tried seems silly (and frankly very American) to me. Get out there and try it, you may hate one and love the other.

    Also don’t you think you should learn to snowboard before you learn to Splitboard? I think learning to ride would be harder stuck waist deep in creek bed.

    BTW: Anybody want to buy my custom titanium touring brackets for $300? They way next to nothing almost immeasurable. You could save hundreds of grams.

    #633106
    buckchow
    356 Posts

    Be brutally honest, does this thread make my splitboard look fat?

    OP: My current splitboard (162CM), binders(Blaze), and softboots (32s) weigh in at 15 pounds even, if you want to compare.

    Coffins ARE pretty heavy though, good point, there’s some carbon fiber cremation urns that are like less than a pound.

    #633107
    Snurfer
    1448 Posts

    Slightly different take…
    I agree with bits and pieces of what has already been said, but I’ve got to tell you if there were a practical way to put water, shovel, probe, extra layer, etc. on the board and off my back I would welcome a heavier setup under foot. The pack on my back is where I want to see weight dropped.
    Personally speaking, a few ounces off my back would go a lot further for me than the same ounces off my feet… :twocents:

    In any event, your best may be to find gear in each category that fits you, your style and budget and toss each setup on a scale.

    Shark Snowsurf Chuna
    Voile V-Tail 170 BC
    Voile One Ninety Five
    Spark R&D Arc

    #633108
    Unruly Baker
    333 Posts

    @Snurfer wrote:

    Slightly different take…
    I agree with bits and pieces of what has already been said, but I’ve got to tell you if there were a practical way to put water, shovel, probe, extra layer, etc. on the board and off my back I would welcome a heavier setup under foot. The pack on my back is where I want to see weight dropped.
    Personally speaking, a few ounces off my back would go a lot further for me than the same ounces off my feet… :twocents:

    I disagree, I’ve found the old saying “1 pound off your feet is worth 5 pounds in the pack” to be true. Going from my Sparks and Driver X’s (always on my feet up and down) to my F3’s and Dynafits with Voile Plates in my pack for climbing on the same skin track in similar conditions (Flagstaff to Days for example) has driven this point home for me on more than one occasion.

    Another example is skinning with a bunch of snow build-up on your board vs. skinning with no snow build-up on your board. A lot easier without the snow on there…

    #633109
    buckchow
    356 Posts

    @Snurfer wrote:

    Personally speaking, a few ounces off my back would go a lot further for me than the same ounces off my feet…

    Seriously Snurfer? You’d like to leave your, say, 16 pounds of loaded-up backpack in the car, and add 8 pounds to each foot? I think that’s going to be more effort when skinning.

    I’d rather get the weight off my feet and onto my back. Like Unruly Baker says, there’s an old rule of thumb of backpacking that saving one pound on your feet is like saving 5 pounds on your back. Skinning though, has different dynamics than hiking, what with glide, float, etc, and I’d SWAG that saving a pound on your feet is worth only maybe 2 pounds on your back in the skinning world (to me). Skinning is a more efficient way to carry weight on your feet, compared with hiking.

    I come up with that 2:1 ratio, thinking, if my splitboard setup could magically weigh NOTHING, then when I’m skinning on this magical no-weight setup, how much more weight would I be willing to have on my on my back? I would not want five x 15 =75 EXTRA pounds because it would crush my back. I’d want not more than like 30 extra pounds on my back. Hence a 2:1 ish ratio.

    #633110
    Stagger Lee
    242 Posts

    I agree with UB and Bucky. I like to lighten my feet up when I can. I think Snurfer’s just eff’n with us :scratch:

    I too use the Dynafit toe pieces on the skinners (with the Bomber Sidewinder for riding) and find this combo to be much more enjoyable and efficient on the ups. I haven’t weighed my splits set up this way or the other, but the comfort and touring efficiency is great enough for me to not be concerned about any weight differences.

    This setup feels great in powder* and I no longer have issues with the arch in my right/rear foot that have bugged me the last few seasons. Sure, my bright orange Scarpas aren’t very steezy or whatever, but they certainly help this weekend warrior lap a little more powder on the on my days off and that’s all I care about. Did I mention that they feel fine in powder?

    *I have to admit that I haven’t gotten out in my Drivers since December ’09 so I don’t have a recent comparison.

    #633111
    rughty
    620 Posts

    Pedro got one thing right on the money…Make sure you get some time on a snowboard before investing. You don’t want to find out that you prefer skiing while trying to get around in the backcountry!

    As far as weight, not sure about the skiing aspect goes, but a board, boots and bindings have a typical weight of between 16-19 lbs.

    an example of a lightweight setup:

    Sentury Dimension 162 = 7lbs 1.2oz
    Ride RFL boots = 3lbs 8.3oz
    Spark Blaze bindings = 3lbs 9.3oz
    Voile board/binding interface = 15.8oz

    15lbs 2.6oz

    Russman, can you verify the RFL weight. Got it in a blog somewhere ands wasn’t clear if one or both boots weigh the 800 grams that was claimed.

    #633112
    Snurfer
    1448 Posts

    Clarification: Comments meant to be illustrative, I hate carrying a pack when I’m riding….

    [edit] and I don’t mind a little extra weight on my feet depending on the trade off. Price and overall comfort being at the top off my list. Think trail running (or backpacking), extra padding in the right places goes a long ways for comfort and safety, but it may come at a cost in weight. That is where I’m coming from..

    Shark Snowsurf Chuna
    Voile V-Tail 170 BC
    Voile One Ninety Five
    Spark R&D Arc

    #633113
    Wasatch_Don
    101 Posts

    I try to find the intersection of lightweight and durable when picking out gear. Since I’m 6’4 and 215lbs, I have a tendency to break stuff pretty easily and therefore tend to roll a bit heavier gear than my smaller buddies.

    172 Prior BC Split
    BD Prime boots size 29 (Dynafit toe pieces)
    BD Ascension skins

    This setup runs just barely over 19lbs including the skins which is comparable with most AT setups, just not the Rando racers. I could go lighter but this setup has been very durable and efficient for me. Bomber plates stay in the pack.

    #633114
    prior_rider
    109 Posts

    @PowderNewb wrote:

    I’m new to snowsports have only done some xc skiing was looking at getting some AT ski’s/skins more suited to the hilly terrian of BC/vancouer area. I’ve heard that the higher end AT gear is getting lighter than the telemark gear.

    Now that I have discovered splitboards, I’m just curious what a setup like zephyr venture(rugged do it all board) with karakoram/blaze (most up to date bindings) would weigh vs an AT ski setup?

    A set of dedicated AT skis is definitely going to be lighter by a long shot – generally speaking. Especially if you have Dynafits on them.

    You are probably asking the wrong question though. Most split-boarders do it for 2 reasons, they already are good at snowboarding and want to play in the backcountry, and it is simply for fun. Skis are more efficient at backcountry travel – generally speaking. Efficiency includes factors like weight, versatility, etc. Most snowboarders / splitboarders I have met would not list “efficiency” as the main reason they snowboard in the first place. “Fun” usually ranks much higher.

    If you are equally skilled (or unskilled) at both skiing and snowboarding you have to ask yourself what it is you want to do and why you want to do it.

    #633115
    fustercluck
    668 Posts

    While AT setups can be lighter, it seems most skiers, at least the ones that want to ski burly terrain or have one setup that they also use at the ski area, are on big pow skis with Dukes or Fritchis, which weigh around the same or maybe a bit more than a splitboard with Sparks.
    And Snurfer, if you get a pack that fits right and use the waist strap to get the weight on your hips, your back will thank you.

    #633116
    ctowles
    81 Posts

    I agree 100% that weight savings is very important. i have always paid attention to weight and in every sport i do, i find that light is right. and the old adage that going light means going unprepared is bs. if you pay attention to the weight of your gear, you can be more prepared because you can easily justify bringing that extra piece of gear because of all the weight you have saved by buying light gear. My pack is very light and its because i bought a superlight metal shovel, have a full length carbon probe, and carry a superlight puffy for insulation. by saving weight on the big items i can justify bringing an extra extra set of gloves, spare goggles, snow study kit, emergency/first aid/repair kit, and an ultralight saw without getting too weighed down. i don’t bring anything i don’t need either. sometimes i see people out with these huge packs and i wonder what in the hell they are bringing way out in the backcountry with them. if you look at my list, i’m pretty well prepared for cold, or a night out in the woods, or broken gear, and theres no skimping on avy gear…even though i am a weight weenie i carry a full snow study kit everywhere cause i’m also a snow science geek

    my big mission this year has been to get the weight out of my split setup. blazes and LT pins have made a huge differance in weight from my previous setup with ignition I’s. i’ve been contemplating swiss cheesing or grinding down my chinese hooks to save more weight. spark needs to make an LT hook system next. my drivers also feel nice and light on the feet for bootpacking and me likely.

    Ultra light backpackers have an old saying that “count the ounces and the pounds will follow”. i think you’ll find that if you follow it in splitboarding, you’ll very quickly be noticing the differance and how much easier everything is with a light setup.

    #633117
    rughty
    620 Posts

    Well said ctowles. I used to not care much about weight while backpacking and used inferior gear with a mindset that the extra weight is great for conditioning ans easy on the pocketbook. The problem with that was that without gear that fit well, I did more damage to myself than if I just spent the extra $$$ on something that fit right. I was less hunched over and became more efficient with gear that was light and well fitting. I found I was able to go further not because of the lighter weight, but because my posture improved and I didn’t have to fight the gear while climbing mountains.

    Prior, I think you make a pretty valid point as well. Fun is definitely the reason most of us snowboarders do what we do. It’s all about the down for most of us and we simply put up with the up track because of how much fun is involved on the down.

    I would definitely get out to the resort and see what suits you best on the down before making a big decision on which setup you want to spend your $$ on. Unless of course you have enough funds to buy both. In either case, the less weight you have on your feet, the more you will enjoy on the up as long as you have well fitted gear. You don’t want to have to put up with being uncomfortable for those long days in the BC. Enjoy whatever you decide to get into and be safe out there!

    #633118
    PowderNewb
    24 Posts

    Ctowels as a newb to snowsports and back country, i’d love to see your full gear list. I’m basically getting into all this because i’ve adopted two Arctic dogs and since I can’t ride lifts with them… I’ll have to do back country. Dont really “intend” for any overnight stays tho.

    #633119
    aksltxlt
    621 Posts

    Well in that case you should buy a tobaggon and have the dogs pull you. Offer rides to people touring, but only in exchange for beer or wacky tobbaci. Make sure the sled has some kind of rocker and magnatraction. and make sure it is made in the USA preferably Colorado.

Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 34 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.