Forums DIY and Mods The Perfect Splitboard?
Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)
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  • #580053
    rehynes
    2 Posts

    i came across this video on Reddit r/snowboarding. The video is for The Tune Shop in Banff, Alberta Canada. It all looks pretty legit and probably the best DIY splitboard iv seen. The tech splits the board, strips the base, puts in a metal inside edge, and puts in a new base.

    Has anyone ever used this service from the Tune Shop? How did the finish product turn out (pics please).

    ALSO, has anyone tried something similar in regards to replacing the entire base? or knows of a place in the states that offers a process?

    http://vimeo.com/62660058

    Thank you

    #677021
    BobGnarly
    220 Posts

    Kinda overkill IMO

    #677022
    rehynes
    2 Posts

    I was really looking for a way to install a metal inside edge and I saw this video.

    Yea replacing the base would be over kill if the base is in good shape. but if the base is jacked up, this could refresh the entire board…right? I don’t know much about building a board but could anyone think of a reason why striping the base and replacing it would be a negative thing?

    #677023
    rughty
    620 Posts

    Overkill for sure, but it sure is pretty!

    #677024
    Scooby2
    623 Posts

    You can definitely router in and epoxy edge in from the side in a fraction of the time and with no set up needed to press a base on correctly, but that is beside the point. Dave Sand is a craftsman there! That’s pretty good work to get a cut base to drop right in there. He should focus on resoling boards too. With the right tool developed I bet you could grind the old edge out and leave a perfect recess for the new base and edge pretty quick. Makes sense for a $800 to 1000 split or pair of skis, not so much sense for a 500-600 piece of gear. Or maybe forget replacing the whole base, just rout/grind out the battered, rounded over or compressed edges and re-press the edge with a cm or 2 of new base. If you could do that for $125 for a heel edge, that might make a new stream of business.

    :twocents: no resin when tapping in the inserts? could cause rot from water. I presume you add a layer of fiberglass or carbon over where the old composite was cut for the inserts.

    #677025
    splitn2
    125 Posts

    @Scooby2 wrote:

    You can definitely router in and epoxy edge in from the side in a fraction of the time and with no set up needed to press a base on correctly, but that is beside the point. Dave Sand is a craftsman there! That’s pretty good work to get a cut base to drop right in there. He should focus on resoling boards too. With the right tool developed I bet you could grind the old edge out and leave a perfect recess for the new base and edge pretty quick. Makes sense for a $800 to 1000 split or pair of skis, not so much sense for a 500-600 piece of gear. Or maybe forget replacing the whole base, just rout/grind out the battered, rounded over or compressed edges and re-press the edge with a cm or 2 of new base. If you could do that for $125 for a heel edge, that might make a new stream of business.

    :twocents: no resin when tapping in the inserts? could cause rot from water. I presume you add a layer of fiberglass or carbon over where the old composite was cut for the inserts.

    totally agree that’s pure craftwork! On the DIY’s I do I am finding the inside edge takes me roughly 2 hours to complete the job, but its broken down into smaller steps over a couple of sessions. I first route a 2x2mm rebate for the main edge and then cut a further deeper rebate (with an oscillating cutter and bimetal blade) in under the base about 8mm deep in under parallel to the base surface for the edge teeth/tangs to rebate into. I cut to length and glue the edge in with epoxy and a mix of West 403 cotton/silica fillers to toughen the resin which I smear this resin paste in a good coating but not too much over the edge tangs and also pre-wet out the slot in the board with some resin too. I push the edge home into the slot and clamp the edge in about a dozen spots with a nice heavy piece of pre-waxed (for release) ali angle that has a sharp 90degree inside corner. This keeps the edge straight and firmly flush with the base and sidewall while the epoxy cures. A couple of days later I pull it apart and finish it on the belt and tidy up the inside sidewall. The edge I usually run just past the Chinese hooks at each end of the board not right to the tips. This has stood up to the test so far and considering the investment in time makes sense to do it for the benefits of an inside edge far outweigh the small cost.

    I suspect the inserts are epoxied in maybe the video making fun got ahead of the process a bit, be pretty sure to cause nightmares with spinning inserts and wet cores without it well anchored in with epoxy.

    oh yeah I forgot to add the biggest challenge with finding a tool to make the edge rebate is keeping the heat generated under control, it can easily burn the timber and base and distort the base, high speed router bit is ok for the 2x2mm rebate as its air cooled nicely there but the deep grove you need a different tool as friction is not your friend there…….

    Richard Harcourt
    WWW.SPLITN2.COM
    New Zealand Splitboard Equipment Specialist
    Spark R&D | Fitwell Backcountry / Freeride | SPLITN2 Custom Splitboards
    e: sales@splitn2.com
    p: +64 3 3266585

    #677027
    NickDrake
    46 Posts

    I fail to see the need for edges. I have hundreds of days on a few DIY boards that I have abused (touring right through alder, volcanic rocks, leave it on for creek crossing, etc.) and not seen any problems with durability. I do not need edges for touring, keep your board flat to the hill with the skins engaged. If it’s so icy that stops working using ski or boot crampons.

    #677026
    ieism
    298 Posts

    What’s the point? Either build your own to save some cash, you won’t miss the edges anyway. Or buy a factory split.

    DIY made a lot of sense back in the day when you could only buy 3 factory splits. But look at all the options now. How can you not find your favorite board, or very close, as a split. There are dozens of them.

    Don’t get me wrong. I like tinkering as much as the next guy, but I will probably never split a board again myself.

    http://flatlandsplitfest.com/

    #677028
    MHolmes
    190 Posts

    That guy has skills though and a great attention to detail. Cool shop.

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