Forums Splitboard Talk Forum The Flats… why I gave up snowboarding!!
Viewing 11 posts - 21 through 31 (of 31 total)
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  • #585942
    butryon
    47 Posts

    plark,
    keep trying the split it sounds like a technique flaw more than an equipement issue. even with the avalanche analogy, i don’t see it. the transition time is the flaw, but try riding in split mode. i think last year someone posted a picture of taking air in split mode, and it looked great.

    #585943
    bigboater
    29 Posts

    I’m a big fan of keeping my poles ready at all times. When it flattens out I start poling before I loose to much speed. Big baskets help a lot.

    Rout planning is a given, and tell your skier friends not to friggin stop on flat stretches. Instead they need to stop at the end of the flats at the top of the next roll. God I hate that 👿

    Lastly you gota know when to hold em and when to fold em. A quick decision to split will save a lot of hassle and consumes way less energy. I never timed myself but I hazard to think I can make the transition in 30 seconds without skins. The skins seem to take the most time and the skiers have to deal with that anyway.

    I found that skiing on moderate terrain is not only fairly easy but kind of fun. Its not bad with a little practice.

    I proud to say that I rarely ever have people waiting on me 8)

    #585944
    plark42
    13 Posts

    I will try that.. just need to rent a splitboard from thebc.net and make sure before I make a purchase..

    thanks

    #585945
    Scooby2
    624 Posts

    has any one ever seen a guy named Dee ski the voile 190 swallow with rental quality k2 boots? He skis as well as any tele skier I’ve ever seen in the last 17 years. Impressive! Eventually you will stretch/grind out the holes on your touring plates.

    #585946
    karma surf
    191 Posts

    I know “D”-rail, and in the Wasatch here, split skiing is very common. Many snowboarders get splits thinking they’re gonna get out and smoke people, only to find themselves floundering in split mode. It’s a definite skill that takes time to learn, and just keep in mind that 80 percent of the time in the bc, you’re actually split. Snowboarders with skiing backgrounds learn very fast. A balanced/skilled splitboarder is comfortable in split mode in most all terrain that they snowboard.

    #585947
    utahgirl
    28 Posts

    Yeah split skiing is crucial. Im learning that more and more.

    I’m like bigboater, I keep my poles out sometimes even though it makes you look kind of dorky like those skiers. (JK, I love skiers. Actually I love dorks.) If you’re on your last lap or know your going to hit flats at the end of your line it can save you a lot of torture if you keep your momentum up with some hard poleing.

    #585948
    Killclimbz
    1165 Posts

    Oldman is pretty bad ass skiing in split mode btw. If had to do those runs in split mode, I would turn around and go home. 😳

    #585949
    utahgirl
    28 Posts

    Yes, I would also like to offer my respect to Old Man. That’s impressive.

    #585950
    mergs
    100 Posts

    @plark42 wrote:

    Hey Splitboarders out there- I want some input.

    How do you guys deal with such situations?

    Has anyone tried to make a telemark turn with the splitboard skis? That is the only viable solution I can think of: after the steeps (and you know it’s flattened out) then you just gotta ski down the rest!?!

    Let me know what’s goin on>

    Hi Plark,

    Its really a fairly simple thing to solve: keep collapsible poles handy. I just got back from Le Trois Vallees a week ago and that place is about as snowboarder unfriendly (massive traverses and flats) as any place I’ve ever been. I survived it by literally riding with them in my hands at all times. Does it look goofy? Yeah, it does… but when you are with the skiiers, not floundering around with a foot out, your skiing buddies will think you’re a superstar.

    Collapsible poles also got me out of a traverse (a fairly famous bc run at Jay Peak in VT), without needing to transition the split -or- take a foot out.

    When to do this? This is what I do when the payoff of the transition to skis is not enough (the tour is too short to justify it) and I don’t want to take a foot out (forget it in deep powder). It works really well, but there it takes some getting used to, physically and mentally.

    My mindset changed about this last year when I did a run with the owner of Silverton Mountain (Aaron Brill) and he had them and ripped in the trees.

    Just a suggestion, give it a try! 🙂

    #585951
    huevon
    124 Posts

    The only time I’ve been shut down on the flats was when I couldn’t ski in split mode because of a nasty crust. I ended up pushing myself along on the board using my poles.

    Every other time, I’ve been able to ski the splits, sometimes with and other times without the skins on. (And I have no skiing background.)

    #585952
    bot6
    36 Posts

    As the others mentioned, the only way to go is to train skiing on the split. I’ve never really had any trouble with this, especially since it is only necessary on flatish slopes where a lot of technical skill is not really necessary.

    I find it easier leaning backwards so the heels keep touching the skis, but I also tele-turn sometimes, just for the beauty of the move or because I feel like it.
    I have to mention that after 14 years of skiing and 4 years of tele, it might seem easier to me than to someone who has always been on a snowboard…

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