Forums Splitboard Talk Forum Tear down the carins?
Viewing 13 posts - 1 through 13 (of 13 total)
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  • #575099
    bcrider
    4150 Posts

    Good quick little read on the use of carins (trailmarkers) in the mtns.

    http://blog.ospreypacks.com/?p=6608

    #641518
    stoudema
    551 Posts

    Cairns may have their place in a few instances, but I tend to agree with the author and prefer not to see them….even worse though is a bunch of surveyor’s flagging/ribbon marking a trail. If you’re gonna’ go to the work to put it up, then take it down :nononno:

    #641517
    Killclimbz
    1165 Posts

    Hmm, the cairns I see around here are generally useful. Of course where I see them most are at climbing areas, developed by climbers. Without them, people going to the crags would not use a communal path, creating more erosion in the area.

    Yes I do not see much use in them for summits. To help keep people on the trail, I have no problem. Not too mention, they are a stack of rocks that we found on the trail, not litter. It is not something to get your panties in a bunch over.

    #641519
    BGnight
    1382 Posts

    Dude drives and internal combustion engine fueled car on a paved road to the trailhead and gets bent outta shape over a small pile of rocks. I find them useful and actually artistic in a weird way. That guy is a fucking tool.

    I think a better thing to get rid of in the mountains would be annoying backcountry rangers on our volcanoes and popular peaks who are really just glorified pigs/meter maids. Now that is a REAL nuisance to my “wilderness experience”. Nothing like having a police state presence in our most cherished wild places. I’d rather kick a few of those off a cliff. FUCK THE MAN IN MY MOUNTAINS. “Where’s my permit to hike in the woods?” Just remember you and I are alone buddy 😉 /summer angst rant

    #641520
    Snowvols
    291 Posts

    On the trail for Lone Peak here in SLC you have to use cairns to follow the trail. There is a large granite area that you walk along and follow the cairns since there is no path. Last summer while hiking someone moved the cairns off of the trail and had me going the wrong way and didn’t realize it for nearly an hour. I was pretty pissed off about that once I realized I was going the wrong way. It was probably this guy who had the cairns go the wrong way.

    #641521
    stoudema
    551 Posts

    I see your guy’s points. Cairns don’t both me much and do have purpose. What I don’t like seeing is people’s shit spread out all over the mountain in the form of garbage, beer cans, surveyors tape, even prayer flags. Prayer flags don’t need to be left on the summit of an 8700 foot volcano in central Oregon….. :nononno: This ain’t Everest….

    #641522
    SPLITRIPPIN
    709 Posts

    I put my vote in for a TR involving BG giving a beat down, and heav-ho of the BC meter maids to a nice Slayer “War Ensemble” sound track :thumpsup:

    #641523
    Rico in AZ
    559 Posts

    @BGnight wrote:

    I think a better thing to get rid of in the mountains would be annoying backcountry rangers on our volcanoes and popular peaks who are really just glorified pigs/meter maids. Now that is a REAL nuisance to my “wilderness experience”. Nothing like having a police state presence in our most cherished wild places. I’d rather kick a few of those off a cliff. FUCK THE MAN IN MY MOUNTAINS. “Where’s my permit to hike in the woods?” Just remember you and I are alone buddy 😉 /summer angst rant

    Damn dude, a little angst huh? If this is your reaction then I would suggest staying away from Lassen and Shasta and Rainier. They are National Parks after all. There’s plenty of other mountains and volcanoes without men in green suits.

    @stoudema wrote:

    What I don’t like seeing is people’s shit spread out all over the mountain in the form of garbage, beer cans, surveyors tape, even prayer flags.

    ^^^This. Here are some of my recent observations. Recently my wife and I went camping at a nearby lake. As we were carrying our kayaks down to the water, I said “What is that disgusting smell?” Sure as shit, it was shit. Human, with paper, and unburied. Fuggin’ disgusting. I puked a little in my mouth and buried it myself. And beer cans, well that’s pretty much a given around here within two hours of Phoenix. More recently, I hiked into what I thought was a pretty damned remote creek to fish. There was a good trail, very obvious, and yet someone felt the need to flag it with surveyors tape every 50 yards. I pulled down as much of it as I could and I still carried out two one-gallon Ziplocs full. I find it fuggin’ pathetic that some people absolutely need to feel comfortable and secure at all costsin the woods.

    As far as cairns go, I’d rather not see tons of them. On really obscure faint trails, sure, but not too often. At critical junctions, sure. On summits, no. I’ve been to some really remote areas around the Grand Canyon, where all the canyons looks identical, and trails are almost invisible, and a cairn is the only marker that you’re on the right direction. And yeah, I use cairns. But I always knock them down on my way out. And prayer flags, :nononno: stupid hippies.

    #641524
    jbaysurfer
    947 Posts

    LOL!

    (@ some of the responses on this thead 😆 )

    Without the uncomfortable violent overtones…I tend to agree w/ BGKnight. I was just thinking how I liked Rangers better when I was a little kid..and law enforcement wasn’t their primary objective.

    Anyone seen “Big Wednesday”? “LIFEGUARD!”–Matt Johnson levies the ultimate insult.

    In fairness, I’ve known a couple unbelievably cool dudes who also happen to be rangers, but they seem to be an endangered species.

    #641525
    shasta
    143 Posts

    I know all the climbing rangers on Shasta and they are very cool people who appear to have picked their jobs based on a true passion for the hills. Without climbing rangers Shasta would be a never ending rescue scenario. Their focus is not law enforcement but stupidity prevention in my experience.

    Sometimes the comments here amaze me in their ignorant thoughtlessness.

    #641526
    jbaysurfer
    947 Posts

    @shasta wrote:

    I know all the climbing rangers on Shasta and they are very cool people who appear to have picked their jobs based on a true passion for the hills. Without climbing rangers Shasta would be a never ending rescue scenario. Their focus is not law enforcement but stupidity prevention in my experience.

    Sometimes the comments here amaze me in their ignorant thoughtlessness.

    Who badmouthed the Shasta climbing rangers? FTR those are some the exceptions of which I mentioned.

    #641527
    dude_reino
    467 Posts

    Cairns have a purpose in keeping the peakbaggers and tourists on the trail. If you encounter too many cairns, that means you haven’t gone far enough off the beaten path. Take your map and compass and leave those cairns behind you.

    I have to laugh at the cairns on the Flat Top Mountain trail in RMNP. This is practically the only trail that tourists can use to hike to the continental divide, so it sees a massive amount of traffic in the summer. Many of the cairns are over 5 feet tall and spaced 10 yards apart.

    #641528
    tr_nz
    24 Posts

    @ricorides wrote:

    @BGnight wrote:

    I think a better thing to get rid of in the mountains would be annoying backcountry rangers on our volcanoes and popular peaks who are really just glorified pigs/meter maids. Now that is a REAL nuisance to my “wilderness experience”. Nothing like having a police state presence in our most cherished wild places. I’d rather kick a few of those off a cliff. FUCK THE MAN IN MY MOUNTAINS. “Where’s my permit to hike in the woods?” Just remember you and I are alone buddy 😉 /summer angst rant

    Damn dude, a little angst huh? If this is your reaction then I would suggest staying away from Lassen and Shasta and Rainier. They are National Parks after all. There’s plenty of other mountains and volcanoes without men in green suits.

    @stoudema wrote:

    What I don’t like seeing is people’s shit spread out all over the mountain in the form of garbage, beer cans, surveyors tape, even prayer flags.

    ^^^This. Here are some of my recent observations. Recently my wife and I went camping at a nearby lake. As we were carrying our kayaks down to the water, I said “What is that disgusting smell?” Sure as shit, it was shit. Human, with paper, and unburied. Fuggin’ disgusting. I puked a little in my mouth and buried it myself. And beer cans, well that’s pretty much a given around here within two hours of Phoenix. More recently, I hiked into what I thought was a pretty damned remote creek to fish. There was a good trail, very obvious, and yet someone felt the need to flag it with surveyors tape every 50 yards. I pulled down as much of it as I could and I still carried out two one-gallon Ziplocs full. I find it fuggin’ pathetic that some people absolutely need to feel comfortable and secure at all costsin the woods.

    As far as cairns go, I’d rather not see tons of them. On really obscure faint trails, sure, but not too often. At critical junctions, sure. On summits, no. I’ve been to some really remote areas around the Grand Canyon, where all the canyons looks identical, and trails are almost invisible, and a cairn is the only marker that you’re on the right direction. And yeah, I use cairns. But I always knock them down on my way out. And prayer flags, :nononno: stupid hippies.

    I don’t know how things operate there, but as someone who does a lot of work in the hills/forest/mountains here (a few summers at DoC, who manage national parks and conservation estate here, and fieldwork for uni stuff) I suspect there is a chance you made some poor bastards job difficult. Flagging tape is used for all sorts of things, but in particular, the locations of pest traps/poison bait stations, or as markers for track maintenance… in my experience, if you’re seeing it on a well formed track then it is potentially managment related along those lines.

    That said, I don’t know how such things are managed where you are, but I do think that it’s sometimes worth thinking about why something might be there, rather than straight up removal.

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