Viewing 20 posts - 41 through 60 (of 80 total)
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  • #609812
    bcrider
    4150 Posts

    Nice work and stoked on all the recent activity/pics in this thread guys! 8)

    Sadly the wife has pulled my bc pass due to lack of a job. These local pics are getting me through though, thanks! :thatrocks:

    #609813
    fustercluck
    668 Posts

    BCR – I’m confused. Shouldn’t lack of job mean more snowboarding?

    #609814
    bcrider
    4150 Posts

    I’d did for a while mtnman but the party is over now. 🙁

    Hoping this storm will come in and I can get out this weekend though.

    #609815
    SanFrantastico
    1514 Posts

    😥 Sorry to hear that bcr – it’s rough out there right now. Well enjoy some stoke from Sunday…

    Happy snow day everyone!

    Putting the poo in swimming pool since 1968.

    #609816
    SteadyB
    37 Posts

    We’ve been doing shuttles on Red Lk Pk the last two weekends. The coverage is good and the snow is great. Burly windy on the ridge yesterday w/windpack in the upper bowl. Sweet down low. 😛

    #609817
    dishwasher-dave
    460 Posts

    A couple pics from this week. Snow quality is amazing right now. Saw one natural over on Red Lake Peak earlier this week and noticed plenty of wind slab on ridges out that way.

    Stevens

    Becker

    #609818
    bcrider
    4150 Posts

    Nice Dave! :thatrocks:

    Becker is looking the way it should. Unlike the way it did a week ago when we hit it.

    Jealous! :mrgreen:

    #609819
    Rico in AZ
    559 Posts

    @bcrider wrote:

    Sadly the wife has pulled my bc pass due to lack of a job.

    WTF, you must then be the only guy in the world that gets more days on the snow WITH A JOB. :scratch:

    BTW, nice pics Storn.

    #609820
    powderjunkie
    1669 Posts

    I hope you got the pass today. It will be sick. I should have stayed up but the legs were dead and work guilt set in.

    Yesterday around Donner was absolutely amazing. Super deep, sunny, no wind, but warming a little too fast. Slight crusting on S facing by afternoon.

    We did see some 1-2 day old naturals about 12-16 crowns on steep windloaded rollers.

    Lots of long sluffs and very small releases, but light and fun.

    Got a little too gung-ho and untracked hungry and almost accidently launched over the train shed. The 20 footer looked good to go but not when you haven’t scoped it. :banghead:

    No pic day= more vert.

    #609821
    jimw
    1421 Posts

    Sweet! Glad you got some good turns on Donner. Tallac was sick today. Just a couple minutes to post a few pics before we leave to drive 12 hours to scrubfest… woohoo! Liketoride finally got to ride The Cross. Side entrace (direct and elevator weren’t quite in), but super fun and good snow! Seeing as how I haven’t been on a snowboard since Dec 31, I’d say this was worth waiting for. 🙂

    Thanks to SF for waiting for us (me) to get ready to drop, and getting some sweet pics.

    #609822
    dishwasher-dave
    460 Posts

    Sweet photos Jim. Glad to see you all got a classic line on Tallac.

    Conditions are amazing right now. Blue bird, low avi danger, powder days are a special thing.

    Speaking of avi danger…

    There was a huge crown on Baldy next to Ralston. Since the debris was mostly covered by snow, I’m guessing it slid Mon or Tues, when Avi Danger was High. From a distance parts of that crown looked close to head high.

    Just a little bit away from there, Bethany drops into a thousand plus feet of powder turns.

    Looking back at five splitter tracks.

    #609823
    NoKnees
    336 Posts

    Just noticed that latest avy conditions posted with some recent slide activity… That late January rain crust is definitely still hanging around in some places causing some good sized slides with minimal effort at the mid elevations. Check the conditions and pick your lines wisely, especially with another 2-4ft of heavier snow falling over the next couple days…


    Hmm.. Guess the images doesn’t like being linked… See them all below in the trip report…

    TR with the avy info…
    http://surfpowdaheatchowdah.blogspot.com/

    Greg - NoKnees

    #609824
    powderjunkie
    1669 Posts

    Here’s a couple pics from 2.21.09 at the southern end of Deso. Nice soft consolidated powder. Super fun to ride but a longish slog across a couple of lakes.

    Powder is probably getting destroyed today, but the storm looks like it will end cold. :bananas:

    #609825
    bcrider
    4150 Posts

    Right on jimw, nice to se you back! 🙂

    Thanks for the post dave, looks like you guys scored! 8)

    PJ, looks like you guys did well too. Is that a new Switch pack on Nattie? :thumbsup:

    #609826
    KTW
    7 Posts

    Decided to check out Mt. Tallac on 2.21.09 for my second day aboard the split and second day riding in CA. Snow on the northern aspects was still quite good despite the warm temperatures and sun, though I can see now why split crampons will be a good investment for those slick skin tracks.

    It seemed like nearly everyone I ran into knew about splitboard.com; the BC community around here is definitely great :thumpsup:.

    A couple pics:

    #609827
    jimw
    1421 Posts

    @dishwasher-dave wrote:

    Conditions are amazing right now. Blue bird, low avi danger, powder days are a special thing.

    Speaking of avi danger…

    There was a huge crown on Baldy next to Ralston. Since the debris was mostly covered by snow, I’m guessing it slid Mon or Tues, when Avi Danger was High. From a distance parts of that crown looked close to head high.

    @NoKnees wrote:

    Just noticed that latest avy conditions posted with some recent slide activity… That late January rain crust is definitely still hanging around in some places causing some good sized slides with minimal effort at the mid elevations. Check the conditions and pick your lines wisely, especially with another 2-4ft of heavier snow falling over the next couple days…

    Just wanted to comment on this. That rain crust does seem to hanging in there, causing some atypical instability for the Sierra snowpack. I’m sure all the CA folks have heard about the unfortunate avy fatality last weekend on Maggies. When I heard about that, it got me thinking about our tour on Tallac last week Thurs (2/19). Were we being safe?

    We had a big storm cycle that had ended on Tuesday. Wednesday was fairly nice weather-wise, with no new snow. The avy report that day was rated at Considerable. The next day was bluebird, and the avy report had changed to Low. We figured that made sense, because the snowpack had had the previous day to consolidate. On our skin up, we saw no evidence of instability on the snow that we were skinning on. The “pole test” on the way up didn’t show any obvious layers. No collapsing or shooting cracks. It seemed pretty bomber. Near the top, we looked across the way and saw debris from a natural slide that looked to be at least a day old.

    This was an E aspect, on a rollover over rocky terrain (similar to what Dave posted). We figured that slid during the storm. I think I might have gotten complacent because of the low avy report and lack of instability clues on the way up. We didn’t dig a pit. In retrospect, I think we should have. However, if the unstable layer is that 3-8 feet down, we might not have even dug far enough to get to the layer. Also, my understanding is that pit stability tests are really only valid to about 5 feet.

    The avy report for Friday was also Low. Both this report and the previous day’s report did mention the weak rain crust layer, but said that it would likely take a very large trigger to get something to slide on that layer.

    Then in the Saturday avy report, they noted that previous thinking about this layer being difficult to trigger a slide on was incorrect. A couple excerpts:

    Previous thinking that only very large triggers were sufficient to cause human triggered avalanches was shattered yesterday. Two avalanches were triggered yesterday by the weight of a single person on a slope. A third avalanche was reported to have occurred secondary to another large human triggered cornice collapse. Each avalanche was large enough to bury a person.

    Recent observations from around the forecast area indicate that the storm snow from February 6 – 17 has gained considerable strength. This has moved the relatively weakest layer within the snowpack down to the base of the storm snow where a layer of faceted snow crystals sits on top of the January 22-23 rain crust. This is the source of the continuing deep slab instability with four human triggered avalanches with crowns 3 to 6 feet reported in the past two days.

    Today, despite the plethora of ski, snowboard, and snowmobile tracks that are visible on steep northerly aspects throughout the forecast area, human triggered avalanches with crowns 3 to 7 feet deep remain possible. Deep slab avalanches are notoriously hard to forecast for on both a regional scale and on an individual slope scale. Individuals should exercise great caution, gathering detailed information before choosing to travel on steep N-NE aspects in previously wind loaded or complex terrain.

    So this made me realize that maybe I put a little too much faith in the avy report. Conditions during the time we were out seemed to actually be “generally low, but in some cases quite high with the potential to trigger a really large slide on a layer that may be hard to find”. Scary stuff.

    Just some food for thought. Be careful out there.

    #609828
    fustercluck
    668 Posts

    Jim W, it might be tough to isolate a column and perform tests on something deeper than 5 feet, but you can still dig that deep and check for hardness differences in the layers, or even do a massive reuchblock/AK block. In any other place it would seem you were not really following procedures and taking big risks, and in fact you were. But in Tahoe, we are used to seeing our snowpack stabilize within a day or two of new snow, and coupled with the report from the avy center that day, everything looked to be good. But even the pros writing the avy report were lulled into complacency, as evidenced by their report the following day. I would guess this played a part in the Maggies incident, as it sound as if that guy was pretty experienced. I would also guess that this is a type of “spatial variation” – you can dig a pit that shows good stablility, but it may be possible to find that one spot that triggers something deep not too far away. Even when I am out with people more experienced than myself (and I have quite a bit), I get scoffed at for even suggesting digging a pit. It might be a good idea on any line with serious consequences in the near future, though, but still make sure you have some good exit options no matter the results until this layer heals.

    #609829
    dishwasher-dave
    460 Posts

    Really good thoughts Jim. I also think the last couple of weeks in Tahoe have been really interesting and educational from a snow geek perspective. The Sat 2/21 SAC Advisory clearly backstepped a bit in terms of their earlier confidence. I believe this was b/c they received multiple observations of several skier triggered slides.

    I wouldn’t sweat too much not digging a pit on that Tallac climb. I would guess you would not have seen any startling results or shocking shear qualities that would have changed your mind. And ultimately you chose a line that worked for your party.

    Deep slab instability (what that late Jan facet/crust layer has become for us) is super challenging b/c the deeper it gets buried the less likely it is to be triggered, but the bigger it could potentially go if it is triggered. It’s a scary paradox for us.

    Definitely a good time to practice good terrain choices and decision making.

    #609830
    safetypinguy
    15 Posts

    #609831
    SanFrantastico
    1514 Posts

    To further comment on Jim’s observations…

    In addition to the crown Jim photographed, there was another in the same area at the same elevation (maybe 8k or so?) and the same aspect just a little to the North. However, looking out across desolation, we didn’t see any crowns at the higher elevations where you can often see some real monsters. I think that up at the top of Mt. Tallac we were safely above the crust/facet rain layer and so digging up high wouldn’t have found much. The danger probably didn’t start untill 1500 below the summit or so, and that’s a kinda scary concept to start out safe and then ride right through a danger zone. In fact, our exit chute lower down the mountain had already slid and was pretty crap riding.

    mtnman – never let someone scoff you out of digging a pit. Tell ’em you’re a geek and you just want to see what’s down there & it’ll just take a sec or two.

    Putting the poo in swimming pool since 1968.

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