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  • #599920
    powchar
    Participant

    Im not sure i saw this listed but West of Jesus by stephen kotler is a great read. An amazing surf story that touches on alot of philosophical and scientific topics. Don’t let the “j” word fool you, he looks into several different beliefs and myths, while chasing waves around the world.

    #599921
    jimw
    Participant

    I just read The Edge Of Never. Highly recommend it. It’s the original story that was going to be made into the movie “Steep”. The movie (while still great) ended up taking a different direction, and this story about the original intent is great. Found out about it randomly on TGR one day (the author had posted a bit over there). Read it in a couple days, really interesting story. And it makes me want to go to Chamonix…

    #599922
    fustercluck
    Participant

    I was never much of a book reader – having mostly focused on porn (snow, mountain bike, and occasionally over-50 hairy midget) – until fairly recently. Living alone in tight quarters with no tv got me into checking out books. I’ve read a few good ones in the last several months. As mentioned earlier, Touching The Void is a good read. I really dug Laird Hamilton’s book (don’t remember the title). I’m not a surfer (yet), but I definitely respect what the guy has done on a surfboard. After reading his book, I’m not sure he’s human. I was expecting more of an autobiography, but this was more about a way of living, with chapters on training, eating, yoga, paddleboarding, etc. Cool to see how he approaches life, and a lot of it could easily apply to snowboarding. I’m halfway through Aron Ralston’s (the dude who cut off his own arm) book Between A Rock and a Hard Place. So far pretty good, telling the story that he’s famous for, but also mixing in short stories about his adventures skiing and hiking big peaks, running rivers, and other adventures a lot of us can relate to.
    Definitely some books listed hear I’m gonna have to check out.

    #599923
    Ecobrad
    Participant

    @mtnman wrote:

    I really dug Laird Hamilton’s book (don’t remember the title). I’m not a surfer (yet), but I definitely respect what the guy has done on a surfboard. After reading his book, I’m not sure he’s human. I was expecting more of an autobiography, but this was more about a way of living, with chapters on training, eating, yoga, paddleboarding, etc. Cool to see how he approaches life, and a lot of it could easily apply to snowboarding.

    I just finished Laird’s book too. Dude’s a fitness machine, 3 hour gym workouts, cardio, yoga, no bread, etc. Not sure if he spiced up his life for the book or if he’s really that core. He mentions going backcountry snowboarding several times but only refers to helicopters. Never mentions snowshoes or split.

    I just read The Edge Of Never. Highly recommend it. It’s the original story that was going to be made into the movie “Steep”. The movie (while still great) ended up taking a different direction, and this story about the original intent is great. Found out about it randomly on TGR one day (the author had posted a bit over there). Read it in a couple days, really interesting story. And it makes me want to go to Chamonix…

    Also read this one a bit ago. A very good read and I highly recommend it as well. Almost all of the books listed in this thread are outdoor adventure related but I think this one’s the only that concentrates on skiing. The author ponders the age old question of “how risky is to risky”. Very appropriate for me as I’ve got three little kids and took a 500 foot slide down a chute to close my season.

    #599924
    numbernine
    Participant

    Free Skiing – How to adapt to the mountain

    I just picked this up from the Backcountry Outlet and I am quite honestly blown away by how much info is in this book. If you would like to pick the brain of a bunch of different mountain guides, a medical doctor, a meteorologist and a glaciologist then you will probably like this book as much I did. The book is like taking the AST1 and 2 courses and then adding in another couple of courses covering first aid, navigation, rope and climbing techniques and a shitload of other information. Yes, it is written by a skier but it doesn’t focus too much on skiing so it is great for boarders as well. The chapters are as follows…

    1 Mountain Sense
    2 Mountain Weather
    3 Snow and Avalanche Knowledge
    4 Avalanche Hazard Evaluation
    5 Skiing
    6 Companion Avalanche Rescue
    7 First Aid and Rescue
    8 Navigation
    9 Ski-Related Mountaineering Skills
    10 Glacier Skiing
    11 Steep Skiing
    12 Ski Touring

    With over 441 illustrations and 104 photographs it really keeps you interested and it is pretty hard to put down. Just the “Mountaineering Skills” chapter is worth the $40….don’t get me wrong, I definitely think that everyone should take at least the AST1 course but this is a great supplement to what you will learn in the field.

    #599926
    dude_reino
    Participant

    ‘I am OZZY’ is perhaps the greatest autobiography I have ever read. Yes: AUTObiography. I don’t know how the hell he remembers everything in this book. The story follows chronologically through his entire life, and he details the clothes that Geezer Butler and Bill Ward were wearing when they showed up on his doorstep looking for a singer, his obsession with American pizza when he first came ashore, the little pub in the English countryside that he rode a horse to because he never learned to drive a car, his appreciation of Tony Iommi, his relationship with Sharon, his undearing love for Randy Rhodes, and doing a lot of drugs and drinking lots and lots (and lots) of alcohol.

    I burned through the book in two weeks. I must read for a fan of history, biographies, and music.

    #599925
    Ecobrad
    Participant

    Cool man, thanks for the recommendation. I’m also looking for a good book and would never had considered an Ozzie autobiography. You know, with the fact that he’s basically brain dead and all. 😆

    @dude_reino wrote:

    ‘I am OZZY’ is perhaps the greatest autobiography I have ever read. Yes: AUTObiography. I don’t know how the hell he remembers everything in this book. The story follows chronologically through his entire life, and he details the clothes that Geezer Butler and Bill Ward were wearing when they showed up on his doorstep looking for a singer, his obsession with American pizza when he first came ashore, the little pub in the English countryside that he rode a horse to because he never learned to drive a car, his appreciation of Tony Iommi, his relationship with Sharon, his undearing love for Randy Rhodes, and doing a lot of drugs and drinking lots and lots (and lots) of alcohol.

    I burned through the book in two weeks. I must read for a fan of history, biographies, and music.

    #599927
    wavy
    Participant

    Following the vein of rock-star-authored books, I just finished “Ghost Rider” by Neil Peart. I love Rush, I think Neil Peart is a genius on a lot of levels, but wow, he didn’t really do it for me as an author. I think my expectations were high because I’ve always dug Rush’s lyrics so maybe I was expecting too much. I did manage to finish the book thanks to the fact that in the book he’s traveling through a lot of places I’ve been in the West/Mexico and there’s some interesting bits about Rush. I wouldn’t say the book is horrible but I also wouldn’t recommend it to most people unless they seriously wanted a deeper look at Peart.
    One thing I found maddening was that he described every area he passed through with great detail, but, when he went over Carson Pass he left it at something like “Then I crossed over Carson Pass into the hell pit of Stockton”. Argh! He does describe eating somewhere after going over Tioga Pass and I *think* it might be MoMart.

    #599928
    lewmt
    Participant

    Really liked Krakauer’s “Where Men Win Glory” about Afghanistan & the whole Pat Tillman debacle.

    Read it just after reading “The Kite Runner” which is damn good & they really compliment each other.

    In the middle of Keith Richard’s “Life”. Pretty no-holds-barred account of the lifestyle & craziness that was/is the Stones – not much inside scoop on the Brian Jones urban legend death/mess. Pretty amazing how much self-abuse one person can deal on themselves & still come out the other end coherent.

    #599929
    emerson
    Participant

    Check out Dermaphoria by Craig Clevenger. Wicked yarn about a outlaw chemist’s tactile-memory-hallucination inducing drug blowing up in his face, nad his struggle to remember his life before hand in a seedy sort of half way house under pressure from the feds and his mobster bosses. Very stream of consciousness with beautiful language.

    #599930
    IrishGav
    Participant

    Hey thanks everyone for the info on good mountain related books,just had a shopping spree on Amazon to get me through the next few months before winter.

    I just started reading a book called ‘Cycling Home From Siberia’ about a guy who cycled from Siberia to UK via Australia,not bad so far! 😀

    #599931
    spruce cabin
    Participant

    @lewmt wrote:

    In the middle of Keith Richard’s “Life”. Pretty no-holds-barred account of the lifestyle & craziness that was/is the Stones – not much inside scoop on the Brian Jones urban legend death/mess. Pretty amazing how much self-abuse one person can deal on themselves & still come out the other end coherent.

    “Life” is the best book I’ve read in awhile. Keith has been going into the smack-country again and again and lives to tell the tale. He’s a great guitar player, songwriter, and author. Take that Mick. :rock:

    #599932
    IrishGav
    Participant

    @numbernine wrote:

    Free Skiing – How to adapt to the mountain

    I just picked this up from the Backcountry Outlet and I am quite honestly blown away by how much info is in this book. If you would like to pick the brain of a bunch of different mountain guides, a medical doctor, a meteorologist and a glaciologist then you will probably like this book as much I did. The book is like taking the AST1 and 2 courses and then adding in another couple of courses covering first aid, navigation, rope and climbing techniques and a shitload of other information. Yes, it is written by a skier but it doesn’t focus too much on skiing so it is great for boarders as well. The chapters are as follows…

    1 Mountain Sense
    2 Mountain Weather
    3 Snow and Avalanche Knowledge
    4 Avalanche Hazard Evaluation
    5 Skiing
    6 Companion Avalanche Rescue
    7 First Aid and Rescue
    8 Navigation
    9 Ski-Related Mountaineering Skills
    10 Glacier Skiing
    11 Steep Skiing
    12 Ski Touring

    With over 441 illustrations and 104 photographs it really keeps you interested and it is pretty hard to put down. Just the “Mountaineering Skills” chapter is worth the $40….don’t get me wrong, I definitely think that everyone should take at least the AST1 course but this is a great supplement to what you will learn in the field.

    I just bought this and i really like it,some really great info layed out very well,love the set of pics of gear at the begining.Packed with experience and it’s great how he incorperates a story related to every chapter from his time in the mountains.

    #599933
    wjb
    Participant

    Two of my recent favorites

    A Short History of Nearly Everything, by Bill Bryson
    Everything you wanted to know about anything and Bryson’s writing style keeps you entertained along the way

    The Last Place on Earth, by Roland Huntford
    A comprehensive look at the race for the South Pole and the pesonalities of Amundsen and Scott, why one failed and the other succeeded.

    I also love anything by Cormac McCarthy. Blood Meridian being my favorite

    #599934
    lewmt
    Participant

    Anyone w/in 10 years of my age(55) may find this book interesting. “How to Achieve Healthy Aging” Dr. Neal Rouzier. So far of the Dr aquaintences I have been able to get to read it, I haven’t been able to find someone to show me the flaws in this guys premise. Easy to read for a medical type book. Scientific underpinnings without getting mired in minutia.

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