Forums Splitboards New to splitboarding, and full of questions
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  • #574853
    ivarni
    12 Posts

    Hi,

    I am new to these forums, and to splitboarding in general.
    (I also tend to ramble, so if this post grows too long, please forgive me)

    I consider myself an experienced boarder. I’m not a veteran but I’ve been boarding since 98. I started hiking 2 years ago, but though I’m beginning to love it I’ve grown to hate snowshoeing with a passion. I’ll typically start hiking when the parks close down in spring and rotting snow that does not really carry a snowshoer is not uncommon around here during spring and summer. So after a hike in easter were I basically stepped through down to my knees on every step I decided I want a splitboard.

    I’ve been looking at several boards, I guess the ones that are currently “leading” in my decision process is:
    – Voile Mojo RX with Light Rail
    – Prior AMF with Spark Blaze

    Since I am in Norway, domestic dealerships are limited. My local has a package deal on the Mojo (includes the bindings and skins) while I’d have to shop separately for the AMF with Spark. This affects the price quite a bit if I shop local.
    Basically the Mojo setup will cost me around $1790 and the Prior setup will cost me around $2670. Prices are before haggling. I can probably hookup for some discounts but you get the idea. An option for me would be to order from the US, so if someone knows a good online store I’d be interested to hear about it. I need a new boardbag too so a shop that offers good enough service to stuff it all in a bag and ship it as a single item would be awesome.
    (It doesn’t matter if they don’t ship international, I can get around that)

    I’ve read good reviews of the Mojo RX and mixed opinions of the Light Rail. The AMF also looks very appealing from what I’ve heard of it. The price difference is big if I shop local (something I would prefer to do), but these things are expensive and I’m willing to shop online if there’s a good benefit.

    I am not looking for a definite answer, but some input and/or advice. Does anyone have experience with both? I normally hike in Norway, and while we do have mountains it’s not quite like what you guys are sporting in the US.

    Generally I will be above the tree-line but I need to navigate trees at times too. If I go for Prior I am looking at the 169, For the Mojo I am leaning towards 171. I am 180-190 ish lbs without gear. Normally I roll a 157 Bataleon Evil Twin for park and an ancient 162 (I think) Illuminati Pentagon for pow nut I’ve recently ordered a 167 Bataleon Undisputed though, to replace the Illuminati for in-bounds pow. For backcountry I don’t mind a bigger board as there’ll typically be less trees than in-bound.

    I need something that can handle all conditions well both on descent and ascent. I’m not a big connoisseur when it comes to backcountry (I’ve always been a park-rat) so it just needs to “work well” on snowpack, windpack and pow.

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

    #640148
    Taylor
    794 Posts

    In all likelihood, either of those set ups will work well for you. If I were you, my decision would turn on the price difference. Even if the Prior is a better set up (and I’m not sure that it is), in my opinion it’s not $800 better. The Mojo is a great all around splitboard, and you’d have a great time with it. But again, I think either set up would serve your purpose well.

    @sun_rocket

    #640149
    Archie McPhee
    78 Posts

    @ivarni wrote:

    Generally I will be above the tree-line but I need to navigate trees at times too. If I go for Prior I am looking at the 169, For the Mojo I am leaning towards 171. I am 180-190 ish lbs without gear. Normally I roll a 157 Bataleon Evil Twin for park and an ancient 162 (I think) Illuminati Pentagon for pow nut I’ve recently ordered a 167 Bataleon Undisputed though, to replace the Illuminati for in-bounds pow. For backcountry I don’t mind a bigger board as there’ll typically be less trees than in-bound.

    I’m curious as to why you’re going so long with your boards. Those are a lot longer than your normal ride, and a pain to navigate trees with.

    #640150
    Archie McPhee
    78 Posts

    @ivarni wrote:

    Generally I will be above the tree-line but I need to navigate trees at times too. If I go for Prior I am looking at the 169, For the Mojo I am leaning towards 171. I am 180-190 ish lbs without gear. Normally I roll a 157 Bataleon Evil Twin for park and an ancient 162 (I think) Illuminati Pentagon for pow nut I’ve recently ordered a 167 Bataleon Undisputed though, to replace the Illuminati for in-bounds pow. For backcountry I don’t mind a bigger board as there’ll typically be less trees than in-bound.

    I’m curious as to why you’re going so long with your boards. Those are a lot longer than your normal ride, and a pain to navigate trees with.

    #640151
    ivarni
    12 Posts

    @taylor wrote:

    In all likelihood, either of those set ups will work well for you. If I were you, my decision would turn on the price difference. Even if the Prior is a better set up (and I’m not sure that it is), in my opinion it’s not $800 better. The Mojo is a great all around splitboard, and you’d have a great time with it. But again, I think either set up would serve your purpose well.

    Thanks for confirming my suspicions there. I had this sneaking feeling that an added $800 wouldn’t get me much more. I still have the option to order online, though, which I guess would put the prices at a similar level. I’ll have both setups in mind, look around the net for a few months and if nothing pops up on sale I’ll hook up from my local shop when they restock in autumn.

    @Archie McPhee wrote:

    I’m curious as to why you’re going so long with your boards. Those are a lot longer than your normal ride, and a pain to navigate trees with.

    I was planning for more float. I rode my 162 at Hirafu in Japan this January and it was a constant battle to stay over the pow. Granted, that 162 isn’t really made for pow but I’d still like a bit more buoyancy. We plan to go back there the coming winter, as it was probably the best lift-based pow and tree-runs I’ve seen. Just hoping they put out that nuclear reactor thingie first.

    My parkboards are usually a bit on the short side, as it keeps them lighter and spins come around more easily. The 157 I rode this season is so unstable at speeds that I can’t go really fast on it. I do see your point, though, I should probably try to demo something of similar size and get a feel of how something that long handles before I make my final decision on length.

    #640152
    ehcarley
    411 Posts

    You should add Venture to your list to check out, especially if you decide to order one online and import it. The Helix is an all mountain rockered twin (like the Prior AMF). I ride one and it is really fun and versatile. Also look into the Zephyr and the Storm. Venture’s build quality is better than Priors. Keep in mind that if you are riding a board with rocker you are going to get better buoyancy/float than a traditional camber board (not sure what your experience with rocker is) so you might not have to get a 170-180 to get the float you want. I think there are a few other Norwegian splitters on here, maybe try to seek them out and see what they are using and enjoying over there.

    #640153
    Archie McPhee
    78 Posts

    @ivarni wrote:

    @Archie McPhee wrote:

    I’m curious as to why you’re going so long with your boards. Those are a lot longer than your normal ride, and a pain to navigate trees with.

    I was planning for more float. I rode my 162 at Hirafu in Japan this January and it was a constant battle to stay over the pow. Granted, that 162 isn’t really made for pow but I’d still like a bit more buoyancy. We plan to go back there the coming winter, as it was probably the best lift-based pow and tree-runs I’ve seen. Just hoping they put out that nuclear reactor thingie first.

    My parkboards are usually a bit on the short side, as it keeps them lighter and spins come around more easily. The 157 I rode this season is so unstable at speeds that I can’t go really fast on it. I do see your point, though, I should probably try to demo something of similar size and get a feel of how something that long handles before I make my final decision on length.

    I think you can reduce your length significantly by getting a board of the right shape for the float you want. Unfortunately, in my book this means demoing some boards, a luxury you may not have. But for the price you are talking of paying, you could fly to the US, demo some boards, and buy one here.

    #640154
    Nesse
    30 Posts

    @ivarni wrote:

    I normally hike in Norway, and while we do have mountains it’s not quite like what you guys are sporting in the US.

    Northern norway, and western norway have some pretty serious mountains, and dont forget Jotunheimen!

    Here’s a panorama from Sunnmøre
    http://www.rundskuer.no/krpano/fossholtinden_horisonten.html

    Happy splitting

    #640155
    ivarni
    12 Posts

    @ehcarley wrote:

    …The Helix is an all mountain rockered twin (like the Prior AMF)
    …Also look into the Zephyr
    …and the Storm.

    Thanks. Will do. This is turning into a serious research-project but I guess I need something to do during summer anyway… 😉

    @ehcarley wrote:

    Keep in mind that if you are riding a board with rocker you are going to get better buoyancy/float than a traditional camber board (not sure what your experience with rocker is) so you might not have to get a 170-180 to get the float you want. I think there are a few other Norwegian splitters on here, maybe try to seek them out and see what they are using and enjoying over there.

    You’re probably right about that. I’ve never ridden a board with rocker. For the last 6-7 years I’ve only been renewing my park-boards as my interest for offpiste have just recently been kindled so I am way behind on all that fancy new stuff. I was a happy camper when I found TBT, and proceded to stick my head in the sand. I know a couple of splitters, I think both are on Prior/Spark. Other than those most people I know either stick to snowshoes or booting, or are skiers. There are Norwegian forums I can go to as well, and I’m trying to get some input there as well as posting here, but TBH this seems like a better place to get good answers 🙂

    @Archie McPhee wrote:

    I think you can reduce your length significantly by getting a board of the right shape for the float you want. Unfortunately, in my book this means demoing some boards, a luxury you may not have. But for the price you are talking of paying, you could fly to the US, demo some boards, and buy one here.

    You’re probably right. I might just be shopping for a bigger stick (I’m a guy after all) just because I think it will ride better. I’ve limited experience with rockers and I am getting more and more convinced that I should try to get a chance to demo one in pow, splitboard or not, to get a better feel for how that kind of board rides. Prices in Norway are stupidly high (even when considering the higher average salary) and a trip to the US or Canada has been on my wishlist for years. I guess the good part about going over is that I will a) shred your pow and b) avoid paying tax on import :mrgreen:

    @nesse wrote:

    Northern norway, and western norway have some pretty serious mountains, and dont forget Jotunheimen!

    Indeed 🙂 I was in Åndalsnes in easter, and I’ve been to Jotunheimen the last few years. We’ve also made a tradition out of going to Strynefjellet once a year and are hoping to hit Nordmøre or Trollstigen in a few weeks. But when living in Oslo the drive up there can be quite prohibiting for a weekend-trip so I see myself spending a lot more time at Hemsedal or Gaustablikk.

    Are you a Norwegian splitter? What kinda gear are you sporting and how is it working out in Norwegian conditions? I am curious about both spring and winter 🙂

    #640156
    PedroDelfuego
    758 Posts

    You should just cut one of your boards in half! Its a lot of fun and probably $1000 cheaper too. Not to mention that you already know the board and where your stance is, very little acclimation. Split a board and try splitboarding, you may like it, you may love it, you hate it. Until you have done it you do not really know what you will want in your splitboard. Remember you will spend 10x time in ski mode than in snowboard mode.

    Here in the states we say “try it before you buy it”.

    Lance Armstrong book is “Its not about the bicycle” and it is try with snowboarding also. Don’t get hung up on the perfect splitboard. Splitboarding is not about equipment, its about adventure. I tried to get a buddy of mine up splitting this year, he was so hung up on the “Perfect” splitboard setup that he never went splitboarding!

    PS: The most important gear is your Avy rescue gear and your partner!!!!!

    #640157
    Archie McPhee
    78 Posts

    This is the best advice yet. Pedro speaks the truth.

    #640158
    Nesse
    30 Posts

    Very true pedro!

    I am indeed a norwegian splitter, based in Volda atm. For my splitboard i use a prior spearhead 172 with sparks. Great for winter snow, ok for springtime slush (like today). But as i read, the spearhead is absolutely not the board for you.

    Talk to Måns @ uhrweder sport, maybe he has some late season discounts for u

    #640159
    ivarni
    12 Posts

    Thanks for all the advice guys, I really appreciate it :clap:

    #640160
    bjmckenna
    8 Posts

    i know this conversation ended months ago, but i want to stress what someone mentioned earlier about trying a shorter board with a different cut. between rocker and wide noses with narrow tails, you may find that a stiff 161-165 gives you the same (if not more) float, just as stable a ride, but also more control in the trees and super steep jump turns.

    normally i think board technology is mostly inflated marketing BS thats just invented to sell boards and raise prices, but in recent years weve come a long way with shapes, sidecuts, cambers and how they all work in powder

    #640161
    ivarni
    12 Posts

    A conversation about gear never ends 😀

    I’ve taken a lot of advice from this thread, and plan to do some extensive demoing once the season kicks off here (7 weeks! yay!) and then hopefully make a buy early/mid next year.

    Since this thread just got woken up anyway, are there any good equipped shops in NZ? I plan to go there next july/august and if I can get kitted out there I might put the buy off for another 6 months so I can “self import” a board to Norway (which would be preferable for “tax reasons” 😉 ).

    #640162
    PedroDelfuego
    758 Posts

    Buy now, buy used, don’t wait! Splitboard as soon and as often as you can. Get something cheap and get on the hill!

    Definitely buy some Sparks, you will love them and they make a big difference. :twocents:

    BTW: It’s fun to take a table-saw to a perfectly good snowboard… and cheap…

    #640163
    ivarni
    12 Posts

    I do have a pair of MSR Lightning Ascent, and I don’t have a lot of spare cash as I plan to spend 8 weeks in NZ the coming summer. For the moment I’ll usually top out just around the time my mates have had a snack at the peak so it’s not like I need a split *right now*. I’m also your typical slow and careful person so I don’t buy anything before I know it’s spot on 🙂

    I’d love to take a table-saw to a board (heck, I might do it just for kicks) but I’ve got somewhere around 20 thumbs and I am already busy trying to build a backyard polejam so I am not sure that solution is for me.

    I’ve got a broken Rome Targa binding here, and I swear on it Hamlet-style I’ll have a split before the end of 2012 but I’d like it factory-fresh. I don’t share my women 😉

    #640164
    classicauto
    152 Posts

    Man, email Prior/check the website. Unless your ?kroner? is whip-hurting against the mighty loonie (lol) that setup should NOT cost you 2700. First, prior sells sparks, and they give you a discount on them when you buy with the board. Second, they have the dakine high roller bag. You could do one stop shopping.

    Unless you’re getting custom graphics/custom width or custom camber the whole shebang will be under 2K CDN.

    Especially if you buy an in stock (they currently show one 169 AMF in new condition) the board is only 800. + the 300 for sparks (they’re normally 350CDN but they give you 50 off for the board purchase) +150 for the voile hardware/skins + 20% off the shipping (whatever that costs to norway, check here http://www.priorsnowboards.com/buying-snowboard-online.php)……….should come nowhere near 2700.

    Just checked and they don’t stock that dakine bag anymore, but either way that should be something easy enough to find locally.

    #640165
    ivarni
    12 Posts

    I suspect it’s related to the 25% import tax that gets slapped on everything *after* transportation costs combined with the fact that the shops need a margin to pay rent and wages, both of which are generally very high in Norway.

    If we plan to get a lot of gear, the airfare to the US/Canada generally pays for itself with the tax-evasion if we bring the stuff back and don’t declare it (not saying I would do such a thing of course 🙄 ). Combined with a dollar that has weakened itself a lot against our currency, I’m leaning towards taking a trip over to buy the stuff and since I am going to NZ anyway in some months I might try to get it all sorted down there. Or maybe fly home via the states.

    #640166
    LakelandSurfer
    7 Posts

    Have you considered the UK? The Sick and the Wrong match the US prices and I purchased a Voila Mojo RX 161 in the spring. The service was really good and I am sure they ship to Norway, obviously you may get stung with taxes, but it may be worth giving them a shout. They also stock Burton, Unity, and Jones. http://www.sickandwrong.co.uk

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