Forums Snowmo Splitters new sled – its gear right?
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  • #571028
    libtechsplit
    198 Posts

    picked up a 1984 Yamaha bravo 250 a couple of weeks ago. i didnt really want to get into being a two stroking polluting asshole , but my road of choice isnt being plowed this year. (see my long winded diy basecamp thread for some related info). its not quite your average bravo, since it has a phazer track and slightly extended tunnel modded onto it. the sliders and susp. have been dropped 4 inches or so raising the seat height up and giving it a more aggressive stance.

    funny thing about buying new stuff, it just creates more work for a guy. I of course didnt have a hitch on my car, or a trailer to tow it on. so the p.o. dropped it off for me on new years eve. New years day, i conned a very hungover friend of mine to cram it into the back of his ford explorer (thank god it only weighs 250 lbs or so) and we took it for a test drive in the dark. after an hour or so of taking turns running up and down the june springs forestry road it started to make a bad “playing card in the spokes” type sound… so we rode it a little longer. doh! . turns out one of the uhmw slider rails had slid back into the center rear track wheel and ground all the rubber off it (thanks p.o. for not putting the set screws in!) so… one hours riding = 3 hrs repair. But it was cool because i got to take the whole slider assembly out from under the thing and get to know how it operates. Did i mention i’m a total sled newb?
    previous to that i had to weld a bumper and hitch for my car (good thing i got rear ended before christmas :nononno: ) , and source a trailer – stripped down tent trailer flat deck for the win!

    anyway, that gets me to today. finally took it out for a proper test drive. never sledded before, total amateur initiation. 2hrs of sledding in deep snow had me damn tired! went up a different forestry road on the sled and came across an open area on the high side of the road. it was maybe 100 yards up the side of the hill, 200 yards long, and benched out at the top in a mostly flat old road allowance that ran parralell to the lower road. the climb from low to high road was a variable 20 – 30 degrees depending on line taken. so, i had to get up speed on the low road, then bust over the 3 foot snowbank and climb at maybe 75% throttle to get up to the top flat area. Sounds easy right? Ha HA, thats what i thought. first run, not enough momentum over the snowbank, and i started digging a hole half way up. pulled the machine half ass sideways, stood on the low side of it and and gunned the throttle to get it pointed down hill, hopped on and went down to try again. Second run, followed a previous track with some more speed over the snowbank and the bravo walked right up it to the bench.now i had to make an arcing turn in 4 feet of semi consolidated snow. the thing just wouldnt track for me for the first while. i missed my opening on the turn down and had no choice but to squeeze through a few too tight trees to get into the open area and down to the road. on my third lap i started to realise that a snowmobile in powder is like riding a motorcycle – you have to lean the whole machine into the turn to make it move, not just turn the handlebars. but the thing doesnt pivot on one point in the middle like a bike, so you have to plant one foot with all your weight on the runningboard, reef over on the handlebars, and simultaneously gun the throttle. THEN you’ve got action. at that point, it started to get fun 😀 . i played with that “boondocking” turn with varying degrees of success until the sun went down, then headed back down the road, backed the trailer up to a snowbank, loaded the machine, and started to think about next weekend.

    #613155
    Ecobrad
    2068 Posts

    That’ll sure make getting to your adobe easier. Not to mention the comforts of home you’ll be able to stock it with all winter. Please don’t become a sled head.

    #613156
    jlag
    118 Posts

    Welcome to the dark side libtechsplit.

    It took me a while to get it all dialed, but now i can pretty much get where i need to go in fresh pow. Here in Central Oregon without a sled the b/c options(good ones that is) are pretty limited.

    Some days the snow is just so deep even the sleds can’t make it back. You kind of have to learn some sledneck skills to be competent enough to get out to the killer b/c spots. One trick is the roll over when your stuck(augered in). With a sled that light and small, just roll the sled over on it’s side, then stomp out the area you dug out. Then roll the sled back over into the new pad you just built and take off. One thing to avoid is leaving the sled on it’s side for too long, will flood it out. But i’m no sled head, i just get grouped with them by default.

    JL

    #613157
    bigdood
    457 Posts

    How often do you have to rebuild a 2 stroke sled? Is there any sort of guideline they use or no?

    #613158
    libtechsplit
    198 Posts

    hah although i do love working on mechanical stuff, i’ll never abandon the split and go full on sledneck. this one is just to get to the base. a 20km skin is too much for this guy, and i couldnt just give up on the tipi for the winter. all the up and down will still be split styles.

    nice trick jlag, any and all tips are welcome. theres a good carry list on biglines that i’m going to re read. i’ve got the basics so far. tools, spare belt, spare spark plugs, and a bicycle tire tube for towing 🙂 . apparently the tube makes a good firestarter as well in a total emergency situation.

    as far as rebuild goes, as long as it hasnt been run out of oil or overheated, and makes good power and mileage, (which this one seems to pass) , i think its fine. racer types rebuild all the time, but i’m not running that hard i dont think. i may grab a parts sled later on and do up an engine over the summer just for kicks and peace of mind though. ( i may look for a guideline now that you mention it)

    so hopefully next weekend, i’ll see if the tipi has survived about six feet of snow without shoveling…

    #613159
    dude_reino
    467 Posts

    250? I don’t know anything about sleds, but that seems awfully underpowered for traversing powder fields in B.C.

    Am I grossly incorrect? Can it hang in the deep stuff?

    #613160
    libtechsplit
    198 Posts

    250 is not big, but it has good power to weight ratio. my other option was a 580 v-max that looked at least 550 lbs and probably more- the thing was a tank. a 250 in powerband with a light guy on it (i’m 155) will get around. the previous owner was a 15 yr old kid (looked about 140 lbs) that rode regularly with 700’s and 800’s. that said, can it truly hang with guys doing hillclimbs in pow, and generally being slednecks… probably not. but all i want to do is get in and out on an unplowed logging road, and i’m sure i can accomplish that no prob. everywhere i want to go pretty much has a logging road to the base of it.

    #613161
    Taft
    287 Posts

    the inner hippy in my just wont let me buy a sled. I’ve come close and i still might, but…

    these two guys i know, one of them runs a beat to crap old tunda. 360 or 340, what ever “bigger” power plant was they put in those thing way back.

    any how these guys only use thier sleds for getting way out there on logging roads, then skin up. it’s a safe bet that they have skied more self propelled first decents in this area then any one. it’s stupid really, because unless I knew them and the back yard well enough to ask them direct questions, I’d never know 1/2 the stuff the exists out here. really make me wonder about the whole hippy guilt I have going on!

    #613162
    Ecobrad
    2068 Posts

    @Large Format wrote:

    the inner hippy in my just wont let me buy a sled. I’ve come close and i still might, but…

    these two guys i know, one of them runs a beat to crap old tunda. 360 or 340, what ever “bigger” power plant was they put in those thing way back.

    any how these guys only use thier sleds for getting way out there on logging roads, then skin up. it’s a safe bet that they have skied more self propelled first decents in this area then any one. it’s stupid really, because unless I knew them and the back yard well enough to ask them direct questions, I’d never know 1/2 the stuff the exists out here. really make me wonder about the whole hippy guilt I have going on!

    VVVrrrrmm, VVVVRRRMMM, VVVRRRmmm. Just ollie the bunnies. Seriously, to get to killer lines. Anyday.

    #613163
    libtechsplit
    198 Posts

    if the bunnies cant get out of the way, then they’re either deaf or crippled, and they can call me Darwin as i run them down. what i feel bad about is the brutal 2stroke pollution. my only solace is that i’ll be parking for the dday, instead of continuing to root on my machine for 8 hours.

    is there no room for a sled in your area Ecobrad? or no reason?

    #613164
    libtechsplit
    198 Posts

    finally set up a flickr account

    scott was proud of this

    this guy needs a beard trim bigtime

    i dont think my eyes are actually that crooked on my face…

    #613165
    Ecobrad
    2068 Posts

    @libtechsplit wrote:

    if the bunnies cant get out of the way, then they’re either deaf or crippled, and they can call me Darwin as i run them down. what i feel bad about is the brutal 2stroke pollution. my only solace is that i’ll be parking for the dday, instead of continuing to root on my machine for 8 hours.

    is there no room for a sled in your area Ecobrad? or no reason?

    No man, you got my intention all wrong. I was making fun of the dude for being a hippy. I’m all for sled access to killer terrain. For purely selfish reasons I don’t want them tracking out bowls and couloirs though. Most of the sledding I’d wanna do if I had a sled would be on snowed over roads. I can’t think of a logical reason why sledding on a road is unethical. Especially if I drove a car to the trailhead.

    Now go slay those bunnies.

    #613166
    libtechsplit
    198 Posts

    hah, i was just being sarcastic about the bunnies also. I actually agree with large format, but i am weak and want my pow.

    #613167
    Jon Dahl
    384 Posts

    @libtechsplit wrote:

    everywhere i want to go pretty much has a logging road to the base of it.

    Have the same poblem here in the Cascades, plus some of the nice lines on Baker have sled access too. I am sled shopping, too, just for long approaches on logging roads I respect the non-motorized access areas, and they are nice to have, but the other stuff calls for transport. I want to ride more than skin, if you know what I mean… :thumpsup:

    #613168
    willyo617
    33 Posts

    #613169
    Jon Dahl
    384 Posts


    I do believe he meant this…yes, its red, its FAST, and its mine!!

    #613170
    Taft
    287 Posts

    yep. mine and i have no clue how to use it. sluffer has seen me pitch it down a slope over and over and over again.

    it did get us pretty close to the center peak though

    as for me being a hippy, this lives in my player at the moment.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EwsAruHCHHw

    so yeah, maybe

    if i ever start to think that 5000 feet is something to write home about or a 10km approch is a big day, then i’m selling the fucking thing.

    #613171
    liketoride
    263 Posts

    I started sledding back in 2004 or 2005. My first sled was a Yamaha V-max, it’s not as nice as the one in this thread. I still have it, though I sold it to my brother for what I paid for it, $500. It runs like a champ, but it’s not a powder sled really because it’s got a 122 track with 1 inch paddles. I love this little sled in the springtime, it’s so small and maneuverable.

    My new sled is better in the powder. It has a 144 track with 2 inch paddles. The Yamaha is a 580, The Polaris I ride now is a 600. The 600’s run forever and rarely blow up and they are lighter than the 700s, 800s, and 1000s

    You should rebuild your top end at 2500 miles. If you’re pull start is really easy to pull when you start your sled, you might be losing compression and should rebuild the top end. You should also get a grease gun and lube all the pivot points in the track. There are grease fittings usually about 5 or 6 that you should lube up every season. If you have never changed your chain case oil, you should do that, you can check to see if there are any metal flakes, signs something might be going wrong and make sure your chain is in good condition. If your chain breaks out there, your gonna have a bad day, either getting towed or riding back with someone and leaving your ride in the wilderness. Also you wanna keep your engine clean, so you can keep an eye out for signs of trouble, like leaking antifreeze or too much oil in the belly pan. And you should have your clutches cleaned and gone through regularly. If you clutches are sticking and not performing optimally, you are going to lose power and then have bigger issues eventually.

    I don’t think I’m a sledhead, I think the proper term is sledneck. 😉

    Splitboarding is the answer unless Splitbooting is the answer, either way we're going snowboarding because America!

    #613172
    libtechsplit
    198 Posts

    the thread that lives on! man i completely missed all these replys … :nononno:

    some good maintenance tips , LTR.. i may have to bite the bullet and have my clutches serviced. Im a bit scared to open them up myself.

    last year, my machine was feeling even more underpowered than usual at the start of the season. it took some head scratching to figure out that i had seized bearings in a few of my bogey wheels. more than enough drag to slow down the 250.

    #613173
    NickDrake
    46 Posts

    To continue the thread resurrection, I picked up an 06 arctic cat m7 a few years back and turned into a sledneck. The plan was to get it for access to board only, but the better I get at riding it the more fun I have.

    Tips on keeping it maintained, clutches are key. Clean them well and often, you’ll extend their life and keep things performing tip top. If the bushings don’t slide smoothly or the rollers bongs rebuild them sooner rather then later. Check your belt thickness and replace when primary clutch clearance gets large. Read aeens book on cvt clutching for info on how the clutches work and rebuild tips.

    Sleds use a lot of off the shelf parts, such as bearings. Check the part numbers on things like bearings and then order from a bearing supply company. Saved me $200 over the dealer when I rebuilt my sled.

    More later

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