Forums DIY and Mods Need your board split?
Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #567791
    fusionmeat
    24 Posts

    I currently offer mail order splitboard and waxing/repair services. Get your board split the right way! For more information, go to http://www.mnttechnologies.com

    #588526
    NoKnees
    336 Posts

    Looks like you’re just getting the site up and together… For the splitting, you mention some upgraded hardware used beyond just the Voile split kit. Can you elaborate on that? Do you also offer installation of an inside edge? Any thoughts on pricing?

    Enquiring minds want to know.. 😉

    Greg - NoKnees

    #588527
    fusionmeat
    24 Posts

    Thanks for the inquiry. The upgraded hardware is new stainless steel allen head, flat top, counter sunk bolts for the touring hardware. The original bolts are Phillips, and strip the first time you need to take them out or retighten them. Also the pucks for the binding sliders (Voile system – on each half of the board) are only held to the board with 4 short self tapping screws. These have pulled out on more than one setup and we now provide T-nuts with stainless steel allen head bolts. All fastening hardware has been upgraded to allen headed stainless steel bolts. We are currently experimenting with a new fastening method for the nose/tail hardware to get away from the rivets that are used. I have NOT installed steel edges on the cut inside edge for customers, but it can be done. I have experimented with the installation and use of the internal edge and find it to be not necessary. The vertical wall created from the cut and the hard base makes a sufficient edge. Remember that this is an ascension tool, not a down hill tool so the inside edge isn’t critical. I have provided this service to friends and family and we are getting lots of requests for this service so a website was in need. Pricing varies depending on the specifics of what you want done; i.e. base repaired after hardware installation (lots of holes are left in the base from the counter sinking for the T-nuts) and waxing/tuning of the board beyond the split kit installation. Please inquire via the website for pricing for your specific situation and needs.

    #588528
    jimw
    1421 Posts

    What do you use to seal the cut edge? I’m thinking about epoxy for my next homemade split…

    Probably old news to you, but if you don’t use the rivets for the tip/tail clips, just make sure whatever you do use can’t come loose. I don’t know how many times I’ve either lost or almost lost a Burton clip due to a screw coming loose.

    #588529
    fusionmeat
    24 Posts

    @jimw wrote:

    What do you use to seal the cut edge? I’m thinking about epoxy for my next homemade split…

    Probably old news to you, but if you don’t use the rivets for the tip/tail clips, just make sure whatever you do use can’t come loose. I don’t know how many times I’ve either lost or almost lost a Burton clip due to a screw coming loose.

    Jimw-

    We have found that a spray urethane type sealer works the best. The wood cores are so dry and thirsty that they absorb the urethane and seal quite well. Epoxy will work, but will cost you lots of extra time because the cut edges must be cured with epoxy prior to setting templates for hardware mounting, since an offset will be introduced by the thickness of epoxy on each edge. Also a thin layer of sealer will keep the two cut vertical edges puzzling together better because of the profile the saw blade inherently makes. When you start layering on epoxy, you are creating a new profile that might not match up well with the other half. Finally epoxy may not bond as well to the wood and p-tex base. We know all about “loose screws” over here which is why we have upgraded the hardware provided by Voile in their split kit. We are experimenting with t-nuts/bolts and counter sunk nylon threaded nuts/bolts for the tip/tail. The rivets are structurally strong, just not aesthetic due to the excess metal on the base side from beveling the rivet. 😆

    #588530
    jimw
    1421 Posts

    Thanks for the info. On my last split I used spray-on Varathane (several thin coats) to seal the inside edge. Maybe I’ll just go with that again. I just thought the epoxy would be stronger and be more resistant to dings etc. I had initially planned on doing the epoxy before mounting any hardware because of the alignment issues you mention. A was also thinking I could rig up some kind of jig with say, wax-paper covered cardboard running under the board along the cut, and another vertical wax-paper covered piece of cardboard running between the cut. Then paint the epoxy onto the edges, and sandwich the pieces in there. I was thinking that would keep the epoxy thickness uniform along the edge. Probably more work than it’s worth though.

    Another question. What do you use to fill the holes from t-nuts in the base? I was thinking either epoxy or some of the higher-strength melt-in ptex (I picked up some of that stuff from Tognar) vs. regular old ptex candles.

    #588531
    fusionmeat
    24 Posts

    @jimw wrote:

    Thanks for the info. On my last split I used spray-on Varathane (several thin coats) to seal the inside edge. Maybe I’ll just go with that again. I just thought the epoxy would be stronger and be more resistant to dings etc. I had initially planned on doing the epoxy before mounting any hardware because of the alignment issues you mention. A was also thinking I could rig up some kind of jig with say, wax-paper covered cardboard running under the board along the cut, and another vertical wax-paper covered piece of cardboard running between the cut. Then paint the epoxy onto the edges, and sandwich the pieces in there. I was thinking that would keep the epoxy thickness uniform along the edge. Probably more work than it’s worth though.

    Another question. What do you use to fill the holes from t-nuts in the base? I was thinking either epoxy or some of the higher-strength melt-in ptex (I picked up some of that stuff from Tognar) vs. regular old ptex candles.

    Epoxy would probably be stronger and more resilient, but requires work and lots of material for that application. Your idea for setting the epoxy will work well. Wax paper is a good “mold”. If you do it that way, make sure to get the consistency of the epoxy correct. We repair the t-nut holes by starting with a specially formulated p-tex which bonds to metal better. Then depending on the depth, we complete the fill with p-tex from a gun and/or p-tex repair ribbon. We use the same materials and methods on our mail order repairs/tunes also.

Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.