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Home Forums Splitboard Talk Forum Legalize the weed and I’ll say thank heavens.

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  • #661113
    fustercluck
    Participant

    And so the cat and mouse game continues. i could see it passing in some states, but the feds will likely try to interfere. It doesn’t matter (yet) what the people want. There are too many big-time lobby groups against it – prison guards, big beer companies, pharmacuetical, Du Pont, oil, agriculture, etc. Throw in just a little bit of fear (mostly involving people who have never tried it) about it’s “harmful’ effects, and it’s enough to keep it illegal. I think Americans are very gradually becoming more aware and more pissed off about this type of thing, about our gov’t and big-business in general, but it won’t be until the :shit: and has a big impact on enough individuals that we collectively motivate for the Revolution. Even if we can have a peaceful revolution and eliminate the two party system that we have now, it would do wonders.
    but really, how much good will weed being legal do? For the most part, those in jail because of are either pretty stupid, or very unlucky. Insurance companies will still have employers testing for it, you’ll still be cited for driving with it in your system, and they will still use tests that show weed in your system for 30 days.

    #661114
    chrishami
    Participant

    @PedroDelfuego wrote:

    Funniest sh!t I’ve seen in awhile. This one’s going on the office door.

    167 furberg
    163/26 Venture Helix

    #661115
    rmchi
    Participant

    http://www.thehouseilivein.org/
    Eugene Jarecki’s (Why We Fight) new documentary outlining the failure of the so-called Drug War and the private for-profit industry that’s cropped up behind it. Everyone should see this movie. Here’s the trailer:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=pvFobm01kBw

    http://marijuanamajority.com/
    Pretty much everyone across the political spectrum agrees… it’s time to end the immoral, corrupt drug war and stop putting people in prison for non-violent drug crimes – particularly for marijuana charges. Over 50% of the current prison population doing time for drug charges is because of marijuana laws.

    I voted for the Colorado amendment for legalization. I don’t smoke weed, but I think it’s clear to any reasonably intelligent person that our current drug laws are designed to perpetuate racism and social oppression without the intention of helping anyone. Over a trillion dollars spent and what has it accomplished? I think change is in the air. It’s only a matter of time before enough people speak out and vote accordingly to put a stop to it.

    #661116
    BGnight
    Participant

    @SPLITRIPPIN wrote:

    A president is a merely a facade.
    Weed is illegal because they know it’s the path to unlocking our true selves.

    That’s why I don’t vote anymore. I have no faith in any of our political systems. I believe your last quote too. That’s why I love listening to Joe Rogan podcasts! Weed is an introspective drug and makes you question things. Humanity has surpassed the need for our archaic/barbaric systems of gov’t. We need a whole new paradigm and that starts with the individual. Voting/politics is violence. Statism and patriotism is a disease. Weed/shrooms can make people realize this. That’s why it’s illegal (along with all the industrial powers vs hemp)

    Ad hominem attacks via a tin foil picture is an example of how ignorant the masses are and how they react when truth is shoved in their faces. It’s sad. The same people vote for Obama believing the man is a moral and just person when he’s without a doubt a pathological lying psychopath. Cognitive dissonance is a bitch. I’m amazed at how many “smart”, “educated” people are dumb as fuck to the reality of the world that surrounds them. Our biggest problem (to get way off topic) is that our world is ran by people who are born without the capacity to feel empathy and literally do not have a conscious. PSYCHOPATHS.

    (fwiw, I only get high 2 or 3 times a month :P)

    #661117
    PedroDelfuego
    Participant

    @BGnight wrote:

    That’s why I don’t vote anymore… Weed/shrooms can make people realize this.

    That’s some funny shit, you keep telling yourself that. Go drop some acid and maybe you can tell us the meaning of the universe while your at it. 🙄

    #661118
    DrownedRat
    Participant

    @idtmcp542 wrote:

    I heard Washingtons bill had a DUI enforceable blood detection limit? No Bueno! I will be voting yes on 64 in ColoRadbro though (even though I get hair tested at work :banghead: )

    Yeah, I will be voting no on I-502 specifically for that reason. If someone partook in even a small morning sesh, they would probably be over the blood limit for the rest of the day, according to an article I was reading but cannot find.

    Does anyone know how they will be doing the blood tests? We always joked that we didn’t want some cop sticking a needle in your arm while semis drive by on the side of the freeway.

    You can already get a DUI already for weed. If think not, you really should to read the DUI laws. 502 sets a legal standard that has to met for a conviction. Do you really want a conviction based on a cop’s feeling towards you or a standard that has to be met?

    Blood tests will be done by medical professionals, just like DUI blood tests are done now. And a morning sesh isn’t going to get you busted in the afternoon.

    Check out http://www.newapproachwa.org/sites/newapproachwa.org/files/I-502%20Factsheet%20-%20DUI.pdf for what the law really says. Voting no seems really short sighted if you want to see it legalized any time in the near future.

    Time to put on my tin foil hat! 🙂

    2017 Baker Splitfest, March 17th to 19th!

    #661119
    chronicracing
    Participant

    @ieism wrote:

    What exactly would be the difference for you when weed is legalized?

    A lot, I’ve dealt with chronic pain issues for 20 years. I have doctor prescribed opiates, but I do not wish to spend my life dependent on them. I am able to cope with my pain with the aid of cannabis.
    It would be expensive and inconvenient to medicate thru clubs.
    A large outdoor garden would allow me to eat cannabis. At this point I am mostly limited to smoking it due to economic factors.

    I’d rather sit on my back porch in a rocking chair smiling at the ladies. Which I believe is my inalienable right. Right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. :doobie:

    Jefe, I concur :doobie:
    Fellow splitters thanks for your thoughts
    Pedro, WTF, who shat in your cheerios?

    #661120
    chrishami
    Participant

    @rmchi wrote:

    Pretty much everyone across the political spectrum agrees… it’s time to end the immoral, corrupt drug war and stop putting people in prison for non-violent drug crimes – particularly for marijuana charges. Over 50% of the current prison population doing time for drug charges is because of marijuana laws.
    Over a trillion dollars spent and what has it accomplished? I think change is in the air. It’s only a matter of time before enough people speak out and vote accordingly to put a stop to it.

    100% agreed.
    Bill Hicks said, “making pot illegal is like saying God made a mistake.”
    At the same time, I call bullshit on the idea that weed is the great cure-all of humanity. I used to believe all that “free your mind” shit too. I read Huxley, Leary, Castaneda, McKenna. I ingested loads of every mind altering substance I could find. In the end all drugs ever really got me into was rehab. I’m not against drug use, but as a route to enlightenment they’re simply a dead end. No regrets, I did learn some things: question authority, question my own assumptions and perceptions, deeper appreciation for the genius of Mel Brooks.
    I used to know a bunch of vegetarian junkies, now that’s some cognitive dissonance.

    Yes our system is fucked up, agreed. But not participating and not voting makes you part of the problem, not the solution.

    167 furberg
    163/26 Venture Helix

    #661121
    sdmarkus
    Participant

    Considering herb can remain in your system for up to 30 days, fat cells I believe, what good is a blood test going to do? Other than indicate you’ve smoked within the last month…anyone know?

    I think Arnold decriminalized up to an ounce in CA and growing is no problem with some provisions. I’d rather keep the government out of it anymore than they already are…there’s not much they do well now :soapbox:

    #661122
    Taylor
    Participant

    As long as weed is bought, weed will be sold; society’s choice is who gets the cash. The ever-failing Drug War, which costs taxpayers billions in useless enforcement, courts and prison, gives cartels the cash, with which they do truly horrific shit.

    This is plainly stupid public policy.

    Decriminalizing, regulating and taxing weed could:

    1. Turn billions of cartel revenue into public revenue;
    2. Save billions in enforcement, courts and prison;
    3. Provide public revenue for treatment (unhealthy, society-sucking weed addiction exists);
    4. Provide a wellspring of public revenue for all sorts of public good;
    5. Facilitate a more stable and profitable agricultural sector throughout the Americas by way of weed and hemp production;
    6. Realize many social and environmental benefits by replacing our consumption of numerous resources with hemp.

    I really dislike smoking weed, but on the totem pole of fatally irresponsible U.S. policy corruption (yes, it is corruption), the failure to federally decriminalize, regulate and tax weed ranks just below the failure to aggressively regulate greenhouse gas emissions under the Clean Air Act and, at very the top of that totem pole, the U.S. Forest Service’s mindlessly abhorrent administration of Alta’s Special Use Permit.

    #661123
    BGnight
    Participant

    @chrishami wrote:

    @rmchi wrote:

    I call bullshit on the idea that weed is the great cure-all of humanity. I used to believe all that “free your mind” shit too. I read Huxley, Leary, Castaneda, McKenna. I ingested loads of every mind altering substance I could find. In the end all drugs ever really got me into was rehab. I’m not against drug use, but as a route to enlightenment they’re simply a dead end. No regrets, I did learn some things: question authority, question my own assumptions and perceptions

    Yes our system is fucked up, agreed. But not participating and not voting makes you part of the problem, not the solution.

    No one is saying smoking weed is going to make you enlightened. It’s just a tool to alter the way you think about things, which can lead to enlightenment if that’s something one might choose to pursue. No one NEEDS weed or shrooms but they can help someone wake up to the world around them. You said it yourself: Question authority. An open, questioning mind is the biggest threat to the system.

    And participating in a corrupt and evil charade makes you the root cause of the problem. Elections only provide you with an illusion of choice. If voting changed anything it’d be illegal. The state only exists because we give it power. It’s a voluntary entity. It can’t exist without our compliance. Like you said: “OUR SYSTEM IS FUCKED UP”. Stop feeding it!

    Lol sorry, I have to disagree on something or else this thread is useless. After all, it’s a thread full of snowboarders voicing their opinions on whether weed should be legal! 😆

    #661124
    802smuggler
    Participant

    Weed makes me paranoid as shit. Last thing I want to do is drop into a hairy line. Thus I do not smoke weed anymore! 😯

    #661125
    chrishami
    Participant

    @BGnight wrote:

    Lol sorry, I have to disagree on something or else this thread is useless. After all, it’s a thread full of snowboarders voicing their opinions on whether weed should be legal! 😆

    Haha, true enough. We’re arguing about this shit even though we all (at least in this thread) agree on legalization.

    Arguing over nothing is just what happens to me when the San Juans and the Sangres have no goddamned snow on November 1 and West-fucking Virginia has 30 plus inches.
    :nononno:

    167 furberg
    163/26 Venture Helix

    #661126
    PedroDelfuego
    Participant

    splitboard.com is always kinda angry September thru November, then it perks up. :banghead:

    Wonder why that is… :drinks:

    #661127
    chrishami
    Participant

    Pedro for President!

    167 furberg
    163/26 Venture Helix

    #661091
    idtmcp542
    Participant

    DrownedRat, your link provides a lot of useful information that I didn’t know about the bill. However, the study, in the part regarding waiting a few hours before driving for your blood level to drop, doesn’t really say much at all. 24 hours isn’t a few hours. There’s a huge range in the amount the subjects smoke, and lots of possibilities for when they last smoked, even for the more than half that smoked in the past 24 hours. Near-daily also makes for a lot of variation; the 9 who had no positive test could have not smoked in the past 24 hours. There could be 12 who didn’t even smoke in the past 24 hours, and if only 9 had no positive test, couldn’t that be interpreted negatively? The one person only dropped 4.1% overnight. The statistics of the study can be interpreted many ways.

    In the article I mentioned, but still can’t find :banghead:, I remember the one subject smoked a moderate amount of marijuana and took a blood test 5 hours later and still tested 6 or 7 times the legal limit. With one subject, this one is probably less reliable than the one cited in your link, but it shows that there is probably much variation in people and what causes them to reach the legal limit.

    You can already get a DUI already for weed. If think not, you really should to read the DUI laws. 502 sets a legal standard that has to met for a conviction. Do you really want a conviction based on a cop’s feeling towards you or a standard that has to be met?

    Obviously, I know you can get a DUI for marijuana. But it says in your link that “I-502…does not change the legal requirements that must be met before a police officer can take a driver to a medical professional for a blood test.” I don’t know exactly what the guidelines entail, but apparently I-502 wouldn’t be doing anything towards that. Correct me if I’m wrong?

    I was pulled over one night and my car smelled like pot. The officers told me multiple times they had the right to arrest me, search my vehicle, etc…but then they asked for permission to do a search. I said no, and they let me go because I didn’t appear high. So obviously, there are some guidelines in place that are somewhat liberal.

    I want marijuana prohibition ended, however I would prefer we do it right the first time. I don’t think the federal government will just stand by while this happens, so they are either going to change their laws or begin to prosecute people in states that have legalized/decriminalized. Which is more likely? What does history show? While these new initiatives have certainly done a lot to raise awareness about marijuana prohibition, I’m not sure its going to be the best step for the activists who are willing to open shops, grow openly, etc once these laws are in place. I’m fairly well acquainted with a dispensary owner who shop got raided back in March. He’s facing quite some legal ramifications, but he’s back at it again.

    #661092
    rmnpsplitter
    Participant

    @idtmcp542 wrote:

    I want marijuana prohibition ended, however I would prefer we do it right the first time. I don’t think the federal government will just stand by while this happens, so they are either going to change their laws or begin to prosecute people in states that have legalized/decriminalized. Which is more likely? What does history show? While these new initiatives have certainly done a lot to raise awareness about marijuana prohibition, I’m not sure its going to be the best step for the activists who are willing to open shops, grow openly, etc once these laws are in place. I’m fairly well acquainted with a dispensary owner who shop got raided back in March. He’s facing quite some legal ramifications, but he’s back at it again.

    Just speaking towards Colorado but I believe the Feds have only shut down dispensaries that were in violation of state law. I agree there will still be obstacles to overcome for those who wish to persue a career in marijuana cultivation. However, thats a small amount of people compared to the number of people who consume marijuana and would be benefitted by this law. But to speak to points others made you have to get the ball rolling somewhere. It would be politcal suicide for someone in Washington to come out in favor of country wide legalization. Start at the state level, get some data together about the affects (revenue generation, job creation, abuse rates, etc…) and then build on a bigger scale.

    Here in Colorado its a big deal for the average person. Growing small amounts for personal use would become legal. The feds aren’t going to be going around busting people growing 3-6 plants. Just wouldn’t be possible. So you could now legally grow your own and not have to fear the backlash. For the average citizen in Colorado its a pretty big deal.

    #661128
    chiller
    Participant

    I found this vid to be very helpful in understanding marijuana

    [youtube:3qnui89t]oeF6rFN9org[/youtube:3qnui89t]

    neurons that just keep firing can lead you on both productive and dead end pursuits. wished I would have seen this years ago, always wondered why some ideas just didn’t hold up when I was not high

    #661129
    b0ardski
    Participant

    tax revenues and the benefits of hemp production aside, I think the most important thing to society is to stop turning peaceful & productive citizens into permanently branded private prison fodder.
    the feds will not give up this cash-cow of untraceable money for covert ops and legit cashflow supporting the judicial system in this country of lawyers, by lawyers for lawyers :banghead:

    #661130
    Colin
    Participant

    Let me preface this by saying I don’t smoke personally. I did, however, write a term paper in favor of legalization at one point in college, but that’s another story… and just finished reading my voter’s pamphlet so figured I’d weigh in.

    From what i understand, you wont be able to cultivate it, at least when it comes to the WA law. Just not sure about the way they’ve presented it in WA–sounds more like regulating and handing it over to big corporations (cigarette companies seem primed to do this with the decline in smokers) to cultivate, sell, tax, etc. And it will create a whole other ring of enforcement.

    I agree that decriminalizing possession is a very important step as I’d rather see police spending their time dealing with drugs that are proven to be problematic to their users, but having anything but the regulated, store bought, mass-produced marijuana in your possession and/or sharing it is going to be illegal still. The marijuana industry as it stands, from backyard personal use to cartel-run large-scale ops, will still be illegal. Best to read the whole bill in your voter pamphlet before deciding.

    Anyone else read the fine print? Correct me if I’m wrong?

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