Forums TR Archive Colorado James Peak, Starlight Couloir, 4/21/07
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  • #568822
    dude_reino
    467 Posts

    On Saturday I hooked up with some folks from the Colorado Mountain Club to head up James Peak and scope out some couloirs. The experts in the media were scaring the whole city into thinking another blizzard was headed our way. However, we set out on 6th Ave at 5:30 AM and it was already a very calm 60 degrees without a cloud in sight.

    We headed towards the trailhead at St. Mary’s glacier, which is up a winding road north of Idaho Springs, past dozens of beautiful valley houses (many for sale). We hit the trailhead almost at 7, a bit later than we had planned, and well after sunrise.


    Your trusted narrator

    “That’s the Dragonforce!!” the Burly Dude said. “Turn it up!”..and so we did, making sure it was loud enough to generate a buzz into any of the surrounding skiers and mountaineers, and canines that were already amass at the trailhead. Strapping on the climbing skins, we headed up to the lake below St. Mary’s glacier, already scoping out lines that we planned to hit 8 hours later, under a presumed bright and clear late afternoon sun.


    Heading up St. Mary’s Glacier

    To get to the shoulder of James Peak, we took an obvious route up around St. Mary’s onto an endless apline tundra. For the next 2 hours, we hiked along the plateau, talking, laughing, taking in the panoramic views of Mt. Evans, Grays, Torrey’s, the Front Range, and beyond. The Burly Dude spoke again of the unavoidable onslaught of weather that was in store for us, but I didn’t believe it. I was certain that the bluebird sky would last throughout the day.


    What’s up Dogger?


    Summit in sight


    Gray’s & Torrey’s

    At around 9:30 AM we hit our first roadblock. Not a physical terrain roadblock, but rather a battle of conflicting opinions about the route. 6 people is a lot to keep together on a ski mountaineering trip. It is more that I’ve personally dealt with, so when the egos started to fly, I just sat back and watched it unfold. The resulting route planning discussionshould be studied many times by anyone looking to head into the backcountry with a group of heated minds.

    After finally settling the issue we headed up the ridge towards the summit. For the first time that day, at around 11 AM and well near 13,000 feet, was the first time that entire day that I had to put on my softshell jacket. The clouds were starting to roll in, and for the first time that morning I started taking this shit seriously.

    The plan was to hit the Starlight Couloir, a narrow chute on the side of James Peak. Looking over the edge of my skis almost made me a little uneasy. But I got this far, and there was no other way I was going down the mountain but via the couloir. I was also snowboarding with an ice axe in hand for the first time.


    Looking down Starlight

    The Burly Dude jumped down the couloir first, and after a very quick kick turn, all we heard was a very loud icy scrape from the edges of his Burton! “No worries” he said, there would be sweet soft pow below. Bri-guy followed on skies and I took the rear on the Voile. We started off by riding from safety spot to safety spot. About 300 feet down, the tail of the Burton finally let loose and sprayed white fluffy flakes of snow onto the rocks beside. The whole middle section of the couloir had great snow, and at what seemed like at least a 45 degree slope. The kick turns gave way to fast quick cuts in the surf. After the third stop, we bombed the skirt downto the valley below, and looked back up at the behemoth mountain above.


    James Peak from the cirque below

    After meeting up with the rest of the group, and making sure to get in
    plenty of more turns, we started to head back out, when the weather finally hit. Suddenly the bright blue tundra that we traversed a mere hours before had become a blanket of white. White snow, white sky, with nothing to differentiate the two, other than the faint outlines of my comrades ahead, leading the way down to safety.


    The remains of a 90’s model pickup truck. Strange!

    Navigating in a white out was very sketchy, but a great learning experience. After making out the brown boulders of “Argument Rock” we were able to navigate out, bomb the planks down St. Marys, and back to the parking lot.

    Thanks to http://www.mountainproject.com for hosting my pics! Please visit their site and contribute![/i]

    #596176
    SanFrantastico
    1514 Posts

    Thanks for the report.. the starlight couloir looks $$.

    Regarding traveling in groups, it can be much much more than an annoyance issue. Stressed out and pissed off people can make poor decisions. It can also be hard to voice worries about stuff like deteriorating conditions in a big group.

    I think it’s important to manage expectations before you get out there to make sure everybody is on the same page. It should be no problem and no hard feelings to split the group up if some people want to or can push harder than others. Just make sure no one goes off alone or gets left behind and meet up whenever or whereever you can. Also, it is a good idea to encourage people to speak up either publicly or privately if they have any worries. It may feel dorky, but it only takes a minute or two to huddle up the group before you hit the trail and it can take a lot of pressure off. At the end of the day, it’s all about having fun..

    Putting the poo in swimming pool since 1968.

    #596177
    IridePow
    288 Posts

    Well written TR.

    And nice area…. I might have to explore that one a little further sometime soon.

    Now let’s think snow for tomorrow!!!

    #596178
    Hyakbc
    53 Posts

    Was that a jester hat I saw in the video?

    #596179
    bcrider
    4150 Posts

    Nice man! 8)

    #596180
    jimw
    1421 Posts

    Nice TR!

    @SanFrantastico wrote:

    Regarding traveling in groups, it can be much much more than an annoyance issue. Stressed out and pissed off people can make poor decisions. It can also be hard to voice worries about stuff like deteriorating conditions in a big group.

    I think it’s important to manage expectations before you get out there to make sure everybody is on the same page. It should be no problem and no hard feelings to split the group up if some people want to or can push harder than others. Just make sure no one goes off alone or gets left behind and meet up whenever or whereever you can. Also, it is a good idea to encourage people to speak up either publicly or privately if they have any worries. It may feel dorky, but it only takes a minute or two to huddle up the group before you hit the trail and it can take a lot of pressure off. At the end of the day, it’s all about having fun..

    I agree. I’m used to smaller groups too and it was interesting running into this at TPR last weekend. I would add that radios are a good idea so that if the group does get split up, you can still communicate.

    I have to admit it was pretty funny watching that route discussion video though! 🙂

    #596181
    dude_reino
    467 Posts

    @jimw wrote:

    Nice TR!

    I have to admit it was pretty funny watching that route discussion video though! 🙂

    It was even funnier videotaping it live. Now…can you guess who is the A/T skier amongst all the Splitboarders?

    #596182
    Splitfire
    327 Posts

    Goddamn,all that bitchin was harshin my mellow.

    There’s no arguing in the backcountry!!!

    #596183
    affix snow
    521 Posts

    Well played!!!!

    #596184
    pulverschwein
    4 Posts

    @Don Corleone wrote:

    Thank you, Luca.

    That’s fine work. (Was gonna say well played, but Affix beat me to it 😀 ).

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