Forums Splitboard Talk Forum Got no Steez….
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  • #671327
    PedroDelfuego
    758 Posts

    @chrisNZ wrote:

    Ride switch a lot just do laps with switch riding only. It’s fun. Duck stance is key.

    No need for ducky… just lots of practice!

    #671328
    fustercluck
    668 Posts

    For one thing, adding freestyle to the mix enables you to use more of the mountain on the way down, expanding the fun factor and making more mundane runs, or something you’ve ridden numerous times, a lot more interesting. As has been mentioned, riding switch can come in handy, and it’s easy to practice at the ski area when the snow off of the groomers sucks. Also, knowing how to ollie can be critical, as you never know when there may be an obstacle (rock, stump, telemarker, etc.) that you can’t see until the last second. It would certainly be worth it just to know how to do some basic grabs (whichever feel most natural to you) to keep you stable in the air.
    Of course, for instant style you can wear some pants that come up to your thighs, with a t-shirt that comes down to your knees, along with a bandana and some SkullCandy headphones.

    #671329
    Zude
    367 Posts

    My buddy (older dude) just got a switch board (Venture). It looks fun. I like the Balanced stance idea and the challenge it offers. One day…..

    #671330
    peacefrog
    376 Posts

    @barrows wrote:

    I came to snowboarding from skate background. I think style comes from years of riding sideways on a board, be it snow, surf, or cement. The more hours, days, months, years, decades you get, the more your movements get economized and refined, and style develops from there.
    It also helps to try somewhat consciously to eliminate bad habits. Always attempting to keep ones arms low, for instance, is a good habit to develop.
    Also, avoiding the Tony Hawk elbows out riding style is a good idea…
    Surely, freestyle park riding can help, as long as you can stay injury free…
    This summer I started riding the skateparks again for the first time in about 20 years… I am just carving around, doing some slides, and some kick turns. But I am sure this is going to help keep my agility and balance up, as well as the ability to deal with transitions, and 3D riding situations.
    The best advice I ever got for board sports style and performance is the concept of “weight underside”. Hold your arm out horizontally and tense up all your arm muscles, then relax all the muscles using only what is necessary to hold your arm out still; notice how you feel the weight of the arm come to its underside. The best riders, think Craig Kelly, use only the muscles which are necessary, and hold very little tension in the rest of the body, this “weight underside” concept lowers the CG, and creates a relaxed and naturally functional riding style.

    Since when is being efficient stylish? No wonder you ride hard boots.

    PS tried to start shit on Best BC post but you wouldn’t bite so I’m trying here.
    -though I am still technically correct; the best kind of correct

    #671331
    peacefrog
    376 Posts

    @Bennytree wrote:

    I just rented and watched an older movie on Craig Kelley. He has the best turning style I ave ever seen. So much upper body and arm swag. I for sure think it helps. I am 33 and used to be into the park and rails but am all about pow and splitboarding now. I think it has helped me.

    Dude you mentioned Craig Kelly (peace be upon him) without saying “peace be upon him”.
    I forgive you, but I doubt the mountains will. Expect a BCIED!
    http://splitboard.com/talk/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=15888

    #671332
    Amplid
    23 Posts

    @barrows wrote:

    @Amplid wrote:

    @shredgnar wrote:

    @Powder_Rider wrote:

    This has hardboot/softboot written all over it.

    While I am a hardbooter. I am being sincere in what I asking to improve my riding, this coming season. So this is not a hard boot vs. softboot debate, nor is it wanted in this thread!

    Steeze and hardboots cannot peacefully coexist.

    Not since 1991

    Is that Peter Bauer there…. If so, you managed to ride with pretty good style in hard boots back in the day of the relatively flexible Raichle Snowboarder, even with a 19″ (or less)stance width!

    No, Peter’s guilty of Hardbooting well into the mid 90s. That said, he even rides with a negative angle on his back foot these days… not in hardboots I might add. He’ll be grateful for the compliment!

    #671333
    aksltxlt
    621 Posts

    Riding pipe will improve all aspects of your riding. I have always thought riding pipe is the hardest aspect of snowboarding (yes even more so than the BC) It teaches you true edge control and body positioning. Good pipe riders like an icy pipe, cambered board, stiff boots and sharp edges. A lot of mediocre riders can get down gnarly lines, but it looks goofy. Standing up tall, scraping snow off the lips of cliffs and down the steeps is bad style. “The Park” will teach you to stay low and centered over the board. I love jibbing tree trunks and fallen trees in the BC. 😆 One of the best sounds in the BC is my board bonking some stump! ha ha I look forard to snow! Oh yea and if you bomb a cliff and get bucked in the landing, knowing how to ride switch can help ya pull it

    #671334
    barrows
    1490 Posts

    Peace out peace man! 😀

    “Since when is being efficient stylish?”

    I have ridden with CK… and I would call his riding style relaxed and efficient. And, certainly, I do believe that being relaxed and efficient is way more stylish than adding unneccesary body movements to your riding for the sake of some kind of “STEEZ”.
    But, style is, and should be, a personal thing, and I am totally in favor of riders developing their own personal approach to riding, rather than trying to adopt some archetypal “STEEZ” because someone on the Interwebs said it is good.
    As you note, I have no interest in debating equipment choice here. I hope that riders choose the gear which works best for them, and advancing there own personal definition of style.

    #671335
    shredgnar
    643 Posts

    @barrows wrote:

    As you note, I have no interest in debating equipment choice here. I hope that riders choose the gear which works best for them, and advancing there own personal definition of style.

    Noooooo! Sounds like we are starting to wear you down Barrows. Your post count ratio will certainly decline and you will become a shadow of your former self. I have a pair of Now bindings with no highbacks I’ll let you borrow. You just need some Sorels and the transformation will be complete. 😉

    But seriously, since this is a very serious thread. I’m gonna go steeze out at the Basin in a few. I’ll report back if I see any hardboot steezoids out there. 🙂

    #671336
    barrows
    1490 Posts

    Mike: I said “here” meaning in this thread 😉 . I like discussing style (“steez”, not so much, as I feel that word connotes an affected style rather than a natural one, ie, if you have to try to have “steez” you probably do not).
    No need to loan me any bindings, my first snowboard (after Snurfers) was a Sims 1500 FE, it had bindings with no highback at all and Fastex buckles for straps. I rode it with both sneakers, and Sorels at first. That is, stock Sorels with the felt liners. Perfect boots for No Boarding…

    #671337
    shredgnar
    643 Posts

    @barrows wrote:

    Mike: I said “here” meaning in this thread 😉 . I like discussing style (“steez”, not so much, as I feel that word connotes an affected style rather than a natural one, ie, if you have to try to have “steez” you probably do not).
    No need to loan me any bindings, my first snowboard (after Snurfers) was a Sims 1500 FE, it had bindings with no highback at all and Fastex buckles for straps. I rode it with both sneakers, and Sorels at first. That is, stock Sorels with the felt liners. Perfect boots for No Boarding…

    Yeah, you got in slightly ahead of me. Baseless Morrow bindings (with short backs) and some burton freestyle boots. I wish I still had those boots. They were the best boots ever. I could skate in them. Just bought my first pair of Sorels last year, but hope to ride in the back yard soon. But now I’m gonna go shred some cord!

    #671338
    TEX
    2486 Posts

    The only thing that will improve your riding skills……is riding.
    I say that because I have been riding the BC only for about 4 years now and because I live so far from snow it has really cut down on my riding skills.
    When I started splitting I had a strong ridng set of skills ( well for me anyway) due to ski patrol and lots of free riding.
    It doesnt even take big lines or big peaks. Nothing will Improve your skills like riding crap all the time. If you ride hard Icy crap you will excell in crap.
    In fact, soak up all the crap snow you can.
    And this doesnt stop at splitting or snowboarding. Its any activity that takes a skill. The more you do it the better you will become.
    Guys like Tony Hawk and Shawn White are good at what they do for two reasons. Natural talent and, whats just as big ..plebnty of time to develope their abilities to the fullest because that becomes their job

    I grew up in Houston . Not much snow or surf so we skated. Every day all day. Thats how you get good.

    Now, as far as park riding…….start small. Wear wrist guards, helmet and some hip/back protection. Find a straitforward jump any size you like and learn to land. Land strait. With equal weight across your stance. Then go a little faster. Try to go further each time. Then once you have that down go to something bigger

    And if you find yourself resort riding with a group thats slower or less skilled that you, ride switch.
    Riding switch is a good tool to have when needed along with the ability to jump and land and also strait line it as pointed out

    Now go out there and get some air

    And as far as arms out, Barrows thats how we tell who came from Surfing or skating here.Surfing will make you more of a spead wing rider just because it takes more carve in the water than on land and thats a tough habit to get away from

    besides, Mark Richards did it all the way to a 4 time world championship

    #671339
    barrows
    1490 Posts

    TEX: all good points. When I say try to keep the arms low, I do not mean try and pin the arms down at your arms down at your sides at all times. My point is that by keeping your arms low most of the time, you are in a ready position to react to the challenges presented to you by maneuvers and conditions.
    I suspect surfers have their arms extended more because just surfing a wave in trim, in a straight line is hella challenging on its own, much more so than snowboarding pow…
    And I would never question the style of a guy like MR, a consumate style master if there ever was one.

    #671340
    TEX
    2486 Posts

    I always get pinned at the skatepark “look at the old surfer dude” 🙂

    I really try not to have them out like that though. It does look bad

    But, old habits are hard to break

    #671308

    It helps me out with jump turns for sure, and in tight situations and on the out track pumping through the woods.

    I will challenge any of you in a jib off in my my hard boots and I gaurentee you i will win.

    #671341
    nedrapier
    235 Posts

    Bit of a funny thread. Just depends on what turns you on and what you want to be better at. What do you want to be better at?

    If you watch clips of Terje or Nico Muller and an effortless method or backside 3 off an interesting transition sends a shiver up your spine and makes you think “God! I want to be able to do that, how GOOD must that FEEL?!?!” then spend some time in the park and get the aerial awareness.

    If you watch Tom Burt or Gilles Voirol flowing like water and drawing beautiful lines in tricky stuff, and THAT really does it for you, seek out interesting lines and really study from the bottom and the top, plan a cool line, and try to stick to it. Take a tip from Craig Kelly and imagine throwing a snowball down the slope and think about what line gravity would take it through the features and transitions, and use that.

    If you watch Xavier de La Rue and Jeremy Jones “billy goating down steep death” and really want that ultimate board control… I don’t know… go racing for a few years?

    Second the points about pipe riding and tranny pumping for speed. Boarder cross would be a decent shout too. Edge control, reading transitions, picking a line, comfort with speed and time in the air…

    (This from a guy who also has next to zero steez, would quite like some, but can never muster enough enthusiasm for the park and would rather keep the flow than spoil it by trying spins.)

    Edit: you can judge me as you like from the arms in the profile pic!

    #671342
    Amplid
    23 Posts

    @nedrapier wrote:

    Bit of a funny thread. Just depends on what turns you on and what you want to be better at. What do you want to be better at?

    If you watch clips of Terje or Nico Muller and an effortless method or backside 3 off an interesting transition sends a shiver up your spine and makes you think “God! I want to be able to do that, how GOOD must that FEEL?!?!” then spend some time in the park and get the aerial awareness.

    If you watch Tom Burt or Gilles Voirol flowing like water and drawing beautiful lines in tricky stuff, and THAT really does it for you, seek out interesting lines and really study from the bottom and the top, plan a cool line, and try to stick to it. Take a tip from Craig Kelly and imagine throwing a snowball down the slope and think about what line gravity would take it through the features and transitions, and use that.

    If you watch Xavier de La Rue and Jeremy Jones “billy goating down steep death” and really want that ultimate board control… I don’t know… go racing for a few years?

    Second the points about pipe riding and tranny pumping for speed. Boarder cross would be a decent shout too. Edge control, reading transitions, picking a line, comfort with speed and time in the air…

    (This from a guy who also has next to zero steez, would quite like some, but can never muster enough enthusiasm for the park and would rather keep the flow than spoil it by trying spins.)

    Edit: you can judge me as you like from the arms in the profile pic!

    Nicely put. Good to see Gilles Voirol getting a mention. RIP.

    #671343
    nedrapier
    235 Posts

    Glad it made some sort of sense!

    I’ve got an O’Neil promo DVD from a while back, not long after Gilles Voirol died. There’s quite a bit of Gian Simmen for starters (which I always have to watch x32 because there are no chapters!) then 9, 10 minutes of Gilles shredding big lines in Alaska and Bella Coola. Beautiful style, beautiful, big lines, taken pretty fucking fast! No Terje in the air, but he drops a cliff and make it look like it wasn’t there.

    RIP indeed.

    #671344
    saign
    330 Posts

    @christoph benells wrote:

    It helps me out with jump turns for sure, and in tight situations and on the out track pumping through the woods.

    I will challenge any of you in a jib off in my my hard boots and I gaurentee you i will win.

    Really? I got some beers, that says I can still jib with the best of em :guinness:

    #671345
    cameron
    29 Posts

    @christoph benells wrote:

    It helps me out with jump turns for sure, and in tight situations and on the out track pumping through the woods.

    I will challenge any of you in a jib off in my my hard boots and I gaurentee you i will win.

    I’m up for some hard booted, fun competition this winter. An evening at ski bowl perhaps? I would love to see some buttering, presses, etc going down in hard boots. Seriously. That would be fun :-). More seriously though… My universal crampon popped off my soft boots on the traverse below crater rock a few weeks ago. Just seconds after I stopped to address the crampon/soft boot situation, a keg+ sized ice boulder tumbled about ten feet in front of me and down into White River glacier. Fu#$ing scary! A loud F bomb spewed out from my being. But I was alone on the mountain with no one to enjoy the moment of fright with. I tried to simultaneously reattach my crampon and keep my eye above for what might rain down the mountain next! I really was wishing I had some boot with a stiff sole at that moment in time.

    In my humble opinion… Nico Muller has the aesthetically pleasing riding style of any snowboarder ever… casual, effortless and he makes the difficult look easy. I believe that looking relaxed and in complete control is good style.

    I have to agree with Barrows on keeping arms low, relaxed and ready. Compare Joel Parkinson’s surfing style (arm down low) to that of Mark Richards (MR). MR was an epic rider for his time (and still rips). But the fact that MR learned to ride on a single fin surfboard rather than a modern 3 fin thruster setup, really affected his style in a negative way. MRs single fin style limits the way he surfs and changes the way he reads waves. With a single fin board, it is difficult to draw out and carve a nice arc. Our equipment does affect and limit what we can do as well as how we do it.

    More snow is forecasted for the cascades soon… correct? 🙂

    Cam

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