Forums Splitboard Talk Forum Got no Steez….
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  • #579057
    Powder_Rider
    498 Posts

    I got no Steez….

    For as long as I have been riding, mostly alpine carving and seeking powder. I never really ventured over to the “park”. I was wondering what practical application freestyle has in the backcountry? What are the freestyle basics to learn that are applicable to backcountry?

    Can anyone share a backcountry experience where freestyle got them out of a tight spot rather than just riding normally?

    #671309
    Amplid
    23 Posts

    Watch Nicolas Mueller and Terje Haakonsen in the backcountry, these guys have the most effortless style. From riding halfpipe they know exactly how to ride different transitions and backcountry features instinctively.

    Throwing tricks into the mix doesn’t seem to affect Travis Rice or Jake Blauvelt’s AK lines in a negative way. Even Xavier De Le Rue has a nice bs7 on dial.

    As far as useful application goes in the backcountry, apart from improving your switch riding which can be improtant, it just looks good.

    #671310
    shredgnar
    643 Posts

    Why not just ski?

    #671311
    Powder_Rider
    498 Posts

    I love to surf pow!!!!!

    #671307
    saign
    330 Posts

    I think the main think that I took from growing up as a park rat was feeling comfortable hauling ass in the air. I rode mammoth for over 10 years, and while every time it snowed I was riding powder, I still loved hitting jumps and rails when it didn’t (skateboarding background) The jumps in mammoth require a ton of speed to clear, especially in main park. If your jacket isn’t flapping in the wind, you’re not gonna clear the knuckle.

    In the BC sometimes you’ll be in a situation where you may need to point it over a cliff, or through a chute into an air, etc. Feeling comfortable hauling ass into airs totally helps my backcountry riding. Of course it depends on what type of terrain you like to ride.

    Other than that I think its more fun to turn the BC into a little powder park.

    #671312
    PedroDelfuego
    758 Posts

    Switch baby!

    Not only is it fun, it can also save your junk in certain situations. :thumpsup:

    #671313
    Bennytree
    54 Posts

    I just rented and watched an older movie on Craig Kelley. He has the best turning style I ave ever seen. So much upper body and arm swag. I for sure think it helps. I am 33 and used to be into the park and rails but am all about pow and splitboarding now. I think it has helped me.

    #671314
    nickstayner
    700 Posts

    @Powder_Rider wrote:

    I was wondering what practical application freestyle has in the backcountry?

    😆 that’s like asking what practical application gymnastics has! What’s the point of examining its practicality? It’s an art!

    #671315
    Powder_Rider
    498 Posts

    Nick. I looking for what I do to improve my riding. I can carve and ride fast. I am advance rider. Just wonder what I can improve on this coming year. Never really considered riding switch. I’m not going to huck any cliffs.

    What are the basics in freestyle that are helpful in the backcountry?

    #671316
    PedroDelfuego
    758 Posts

    @Powder_Rider wrote:

    What are the basics in freestyle that are helpful in the backcountry?

    Grabs really help to stabilize you in the air too. Rolling up the windows is never optimal…

    #671317
    Zude
    367 Posts

    Approaching 40 and having no park/skate skills to speak of, i feel your pain. I can still ride big, steep lines and love the backcountry. The main advantage i have is endurance from riding mtb for years and hiking 95% of my runs.
    I have been hiking the last several years with a young guy (early twenties) and what he lacks in stamina he makes up for with skill and fearlessness on the mountain. He blows me away with his style and speed, yet we both seem to have a great time regardless.
    The question appears to have been answered already by previous poster boys. Really all style comes down to is an expression of your own joy for riding regardles of pipe or park experience.

    #671318
    802smuggler
    369 Posts

    This has hardboot/softboot written all over it.

    #671319
    Powder_Rider
    498 Posts

    This has hardboot/softboot written all over it.

    While I am a hardbooter. I am being sincere in what I asking to improve my riding, this coming season. So this is not a hard boot vs. softboot debate, nor is it wanted in this thread!

    #671320
    shredgnar
    643 Posts

    @Powder_Rider wrote:

    This has hardboot/softboot written all over it.

    While I am a hardbooter. I am being sincere in what I asking to improve my riding, this coming season. So this is not a hard boot vs. softboot debate, nor is it wanted in this thread!

    Steeze and hardboots cannot peacefully coexist.

    #671321
    Amplid
    23 Posts

    @shredgnar wrote:

    @Powder_Rider wrote:

    This has hardboot/softboot written all over it.

    While I am a hardbooter. I am being sincere in what I asking to improve my riding, this coming season. So this is not a hard boot vs. softboot debate, nor is it wanted in this thread!

    Steeze and hardboots cannot peacefully coexist.

    Not since 1991

    #671322
    Snurfer
    1448 Posts

    Let me qualify my answer by saying freestyle left my repertoire at the end of the eighties along with the cartilage in my left knee, so my experience is minimal. Particularly since freestyle then and now are universes apart.

    But based on watching the likes of Rice, Tereje, and all top pipe and park riders I’d consider these skills quite valuable in the backcountry.

    Flexibility
    Spatial awareness
    Body control

    Shark Snowsurf Chuna
    Voile V-Tail 170 BC
    Voile One Ninety Five
    Spark R&D Arc

    #671323
    chrisNZ
    304 Posts

    Ride switch a lot just do laps with switch riding only. It’s fun. Duck stance is key. Traversing on your toes can be safer and allows you to take a higher line if needed.

    #671324
    barrows
    1490 Posts

    I came to snowboarding from skate background. I think style comes from years of riding sideways on a board, be it snow, surf, or cement. The more hours, days, months, years, decades you get, the more your movements get economized and refined, and style develops from there.
    It also helps to try somewhat consciously to eliminate bad habits. Always attempting to keep ones arms low, for instance, is a good habit to develop.
    Also, avoiding the Tony Hawk elbows out riding style is a good idea…
    Surely, freestyle park riding can help, as long as you can stay injury free…
    This summer I started riding the skateparks again for the first time in about 20 years… I am just carving around, doing some slides, and some kick turns. But I am sure this is going to help keep my agility and balance up, as well as the ability to deal with transitions, and 3D riding situations.
    The best advice I ever got for board sports style and performance is the concept of “weight underside”. Hold your arm out horizontally and tense up all your arm muscles, then relax all the muscles using only what is necessary to hold your arm out still; notice how you feel the weight of the arm come to its underside. The best riders, think Craig Kelly, use only the muscles which are necessary, and hold very little tension in the rest of the body, this “weight underside” concept lowers the CG, and creates a relaxed and naturally functional riding style.

    #671325
    barrows
    1490 Posts

    @Amplid wrote:

    @shredgnar wrote:

    @Powder_Rider wrote:

    This has hardboot/softboot written all over it.

    While I am a hardbooter. I am being sincere in what I asking to improve my riding, this coming season. So this is not a hard boot vs. softboot debate, nor is it wanted in this thread!

    Steeze and hardboots cannot peacefully coexist.

    Not since 1991

    Is that Peter Bauer there…. If so, you managed to ride with pretty good style in hard boots back in the day of the relatively flexible Raichle Snowboarder, even with a 19″ (or less)stance width!

    #671326
    lernr
    234 Posts

    Getting air is one of the most fun things you can do in snowboarding, but extra care is required in the BC, especially if you don’t have a crew.

    A cool use of freestyle would be this: you are riding along and come to a creek bed or some similar and it’s too big to jump but look there’s a broken tree spanning across – now you can jib it like a rail :thumpsup:

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