Forums Avy Discussion Forum beacon in da pack?
Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 34 total)
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  • #567486
    K Dan
    66 Posts

    Esteemed bc bros and sisters,

    Looking for some thoughts from the avy experts out there.

    Is it acceptable to stash your avy beacon in your daypack, or should it be attached directly to your body? Don’t know if you need to worry about getting seperated from your pack in an avy 😯 Thx.

    #586548
    Barret
    66 Posts

    It should always be on your body in my oppinion. Getting seperated from your pack is one problem, but extra time it will take you to get it out of your pack if one of your friends goes down and you need to search for them, while it seems short, could meen the difference.
    -Barret

    #586549
    dave
    100 Posts

    K. Dan says:

    Is it acceptable to stash your avy beacon in your daypack, or should it be attached directly to your body?

    😯 seriously? take an avi course and answer that question for yourself.

    #586550
    K Dan
    66 Posts

    take an avi course and answer that question for yourself.

    yeah, I’m signed up but I just got my beacon and started thinking ahead. (what was I thinking???) 🙄

    #586551
    K Dan
    66 Posts

    BTW (moderator correct me if I’m wrong), this is an avy discussion forum. To me that means a place where less experienced riders can ask ?’s to more experienced riders.

    Dave, you made a very valid point about taking an avy class, I agree 100%. Mine is the week after next. I wasn’t trying to get certified through this discussion forum 😆

    I pretty much assumed the answer to my question, but figured if I was asking it, others might be too. Also, there’s not all that much avy discussion here, so I thought I’d ask a stupid question to get things rolling 😀 The unfortunate reality is that there are people in the bc today with less experience than even I… Point us to a class, but please entertain our dumb questions. Lots of it comes from hours of daydreaming about the bc.

    Finally, an avalanche expert could be buried by an avy triggered by an avy idiot (see UTARDS thread). Trust me, you want us to know as much as possible.

    Sorry to rant, I think people shouldn’t be intimidated to ask questions that might be deemed stupid. I’d rather not wonder the answer to that stupid question while struggling to breathe under 6 feet of snow.

    Peace!

    #586552
    bcrider
    4150 Posts

    Dave,

    Ken has a point. As the old saying goes, “there are no stupid questionsâ€Â

    #586553
    derm75
    28 Posts

    When I took my class not to long ago, the guys teaching it said it was ok to put it in a zippered pocket, preferably on your pants. I think I’ve heard about poeple having their jackets ripped off, but not sure about pants.

    #586554
    dave
    100 Posts

    ok. i didn’t mean to discourage the question. sorry folks, but we’re talking about a device that comes with straps that are fixed to it so that you can attach it to your body. how could you not realize the importance of attaching it to yourself? yes, your bag can get ripped off you in a fall or slide, and well before your jacket. if your jacket gets ripped off in an avi or a digger then it may be safe to assume that the transciever just becomes a tool for a body recovery.

    🙄 i get loads of “uninformed” questions all the time…. will it be packed down enough to boot it? (it just snowed 10″) do i need snowshoes/skins? do i need a shovel? how much water do i need to bring? and the most open ended; what do i need to bring? etc etc. it comes with the territory i guess, so… i guess i just get sick of hearing ?’s like this after a while. ( 😳 no offense or discouragement intended)

    this has all been said before: however, the focus which lies on the importance of a transceiver as being a safety device is a strong misnomer (sp?). everyone should have one in the backcountry, along with a shovel, probe, partners and they all know how to use the equipment. HOWEVER, this should not act as our ticket or our right to enter the backcountry. our head is the most important tool we’ve got; use it!…. with all the common sense we all say we have. i’d rather not preach about what common sense is and what it isn’t. that’s for each individual to decide for themselves. IMO (and i hope most everyone entering the bc), wearing a transeiver on your body would be considered common sense. oh, and don’t forget to turn it on either! 😉

    #586555
    karma surf
    191 Posts

    K, Dan-

    The only stupid question is one not asked. Congrats to you for seeking education.

    Every splitter I know takes their pack off for the transition. Imagine having your pack w/beacon lying in the snow while you begin transitioning your board. Suddenly someone up above triggers a slide, and you and your pack (beacon) are separated.

    This is a definite possibility, and I’m certain that you’d rather have the rescuers searching for you rather than your pack.

    Welome to splitboarding, best wishes in your search for bc turns! 8)

    #586556
    K Dan
    66 Posts

    Thanks for the thoughts all. Beacon on da body! 8)

    Dave, I feel ya man. In my profession, I deal with uninformed consumers every day. It’s frustrating. Luckily they pay my check to fund my snow addiction, so it’s tolerable.

    I’m a cross country skier turned snowboarder from the midwest (do you think I’ll like splitboarding? 😛 ), so i’m not exactly a bc virgin, but the avy part is all new to me. I’m taking it very seriously and starting from butt-scratch.

    Anyway, thanks again for the replys, happy turns all!

    #586557
    mergs
    100 Posts

    My reply is not a “pile on” to K Dan’s post. I would never jump on anyone asking newb questions as I am perfectly capable of asking the same newb questions, and I don’t want to be jumped on by the vets here either. I hope that this board stays cool and does not discourage newbs like K Dan and I from asking such things.

    So in that spirit: I just wanted to point out an observation… my Ortovox beacon (and those of all my regular crew) will not activate/turn on unless you have the straps’ one end inserted and turned 90 degrees. This design makes it pretty obvious that it must be strapped to the body. You could engage it then stuff it in a pack or pocket but you will be pretty well aware that you’ve just defaeated a mechanism that encourages the beacon be on your body.

    Do other beacon designs not have this sort of “safety feature” ?

    #586558
    dfinn
    138 Posts

    no, not all beacons have that feature. I really like that about my ortovox too.

    #586559
    knucklesplitter
    340 Posts

    My beacon always goes in my pack. When I’m in an avy zone my pack is on. If an avy is strong enough to rip my pack off, then I’m dead and the beacon is no use to me anymore.

    BTW my avy instructor said it was okay to just put your beacon in your pocket, or jacket, or pack.

    #586560
    NoKnees
    336 Posts

    Had never heard an instructor or any reference book say it was okay to be in your pack, but I can understand the logic used. I might not agree, but that’s the joy of it all… Don’t have to.. 😉

    My experience encourages me to keep it on my body. I took a good fall a couple years back inbounds that exploaded my pack and blew up a buckle and strap leaving quite a yardsale. I was fine (although not sure how fine i would have been without the pack). I can definitely see a situation where I might loose a pack, outside pocket, etc and still be alive and well enough to wish I could be found…

    I’ll stick to keeping the beacon strapped close to my body, under my jacket, or at worse in secured pocket of a middle or base layer. I just figure if there is an easy way to up my chances, I’ll do it…

    Greg - NoKnees

    #586561
    powderjunkie
    1669 Posts

    I like karma surf’s example why not to put beacon in pack.

    Also, how long will it take to get your beacon out (safely) when your buddy gets caught in a slide. What if you’re under hang fire with your pack off, putting your beacon on to search for your friend.

    hmmm…. I say, just wear the damn thing.

    #586562
    knucklesplitter
    340 Posts

    @powderjunkie wrote:

    Also, how long will it take to get your beacon out (safely) when your buddy gets caught in a slide.

    My beacon goes in with my shovel and probe (and first aid kit too). Those have to come out anyway in that situation. How does it take longer if everything you need is together in the same place? You would have to remove your pack, open up your jacket, get your beacon out, open your pack, and remove your shovel/probe. Whereas I just remove my pack, open it up and get everything out at once. Which one takes longer?

    Karma Surf’s point is valid. That and there is a possibility of the pack being ripped off while you still survive like NoKnees says. We also must not forget something that a beacon is often used for – body recovery.

    You guys are prolly right that the best place for the beacon is strapped to you. I do think we focus too much time on these avy survival devices like beacons (and worst of all Avalungs) and not enough time on how to stay out of an avy (I should talk, right PJ?). Don’t make the board/ski transition in a run-out zone, etc. If you go out there thinking that you will survive an avy, then your risk of being caught in one goes way up – it’s psychological human factors. Just the fact that you wear a beacon means you are willing to put you and others in a certain amount of risk. *That* was my instructor’s point and why he says where you put the beacon is not that important.

    #586563
    dave
    100 Posts

    knucklesplitter says:

    You guys are prolly right that the best place for the beacon is strapped to you. I do think we focus too much time on these avy survival devices like beacons (and worst of all Avalungs) and not enough time on how to stay out of an avy (I should talk, right PJ?).

    agreed!

    knucklesplitter says:

    If you go out there thinking that you will survive an avy, then your risk of being caught in one goes way up – it’s psychological human factors. Just the fact that you wear a beacon means you are willing to put you and others in a certain amount of risk. *That* was my instructor’s point and why he says where you put the beacon is not that important.

    firkristsakes! well then, leave the beacon at home if that’s the attitude. why would we put ourselves at such a risk and not take any precautions in doing so? a beacon acts as that precaution; not a prevention. does the instructor realize this? it is kind of a valid point he makes, but i don’t agree with teaching this in a class (advanced or beginner). it seems as though it’s his own feelings about overemphasizing the importance of “safety” gear. IMO, keep that to yourself and amongst friends, not to a group of newbies trying to learn the “right way” of how to keep themselves safe.

    let’s face it; we like things bigger, faster, louder, etc. therefore, we also may have the tendancy to try and cut corners. placing a beacon in your pack and giving yourself just one more thing to try and finangle with in a rescue search should not be an example of this, or something that should be promoted in an educational avalanche course. trying to justify it by having to get other equipment out of your pack at the same time is just plain bs. every second matters, and why would somebody (in thier right mind) want something else to remember in such an intense situation where there are about a million things going on in your head already? that makes no sense to me, but different strokes for different folks i suppose. (not folks i would plan on traveling with)

    #586564
    powderjunkie
    1669 Posts

    don’t you usually need the beacon first to locate the victim, then get out the shovel and probe.

    You’re not going to hold onto your shovel and probe in one hand, then your beacon in the other hand trying to find a buried victim are you?

    Or you’ll need to get into your pack 2 times, not 1.

    food for thought.

    What’s the REAL reason for not putting the beacon on your body? The beer gut looks a little bigger. 😀

    #586565
    SanFrantastico
    1514 Posts

    I like strapping it on… makes me feel like Fred Garvin – Male Prostitute!

    Putting the poo in swimming pool since 1968.

    #586566
    jimw
    1421 Posts

    My transceiver is always on my body, and turned on/checked at the trailhead (not just when I get close to a “suspected avy zone”).

    As far as putting it in a pocket… I know nobody else on here has ever done this :shock:, but I can’t count the number of times I’ve gotten to the bottom of a run and realized I had opened a jacket or pants pocket at the top and forgot to close it. When you put the transceiver on your body, it’s pretty foolproof to make sure it’s securely attached (and working, with the Ortovox power on via strap connection method).

    In a search scenario, most transceiver strap attachments are designed so that you can quickly get them into search mode and hold them at a comfortable searching distance *without* removing the straps, which is important if a secondary slide occurs while you’re searching and you’re caught.

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