Viewing 20 posts - 41 through 60 (of 68 total)
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  • #635200
    russman
    692 Posts

    @WhitePine wrote:

    I think this is a cool innovation. Although I wouldn’t use them for say… snowboarding purposes, I can definitely see where they would be attractive to people like snowshoers, winter backpackers, and especially ice climbers.

    I know about a million super talented ice climbers that think skiing/riding are too scary to bother with (seems silly, I know:). Before I splitted I used to bootpack or snowshoe on winter mountaineering trips. There are a lot of alpine purists that dont ski tour… Anyway, this is one market you should keep in mind. Neil’s points about jump building and snow surfing are great; that gives me a logical platform.

    I must say however that I watched my good friend Bryce shredding the pipe and send a rodeo 5 on an icy park jump yesterday…. All on his splitboard. Also, Travis hucked that Alaska crevasse gap on his splitty. I guess some of on here are just purely dedicated to the progression of splitting as it’s own entity. There is nothing obsolete or compromizing about finding the right board and interface combo. Best of luck though, there is market for your product.

    #635201
    Idaho
    1 Posts

    I am all for seeing where this product goes. I have ridden for almost twenty years now, and really appreciate the feeling of my personal snowboard. I also own a split, which feels so much different to me whenever I ride it, and I also own snowshoes – which can stay in the back of my closet or on the back of my sled. To the guy that said he will not debate the issue of the differences in feeling between a split and a normal board… maybe he has been riding his split too much? I know for a fact I would in all instances rather ride my own board than my split. Keep arguing it, but I know personally… I prefer this option.

    I am also a photographer, I often ride with upwards of 20 pounds of camera equipment, and tripods on my back, so those people that freak out about seven pounds on their back kind of make me laugh.

    I think Cory is right this is not for everyone, but I will tell you this. I have been there from the first day he pressed his first ski, and watched the progression of each of his pieces and ideas form into one great piece of machinery – sexy piece of equipment. You would drool just holding one and collapsing it. I can speak to this, they are thoughtfully designed and will only get better. I know Cory, and I guarantee he will keep pushing these further and further. I think he will likely drop the weight by a couple more pounds when all is said and done. If you see these things in person you may be convinced… I mean it is crazy looking at them and then realizing they collapse down so small. If that doesn’t deserve a “well done” from you back country enthusiasts, I am not sure what does. Maybe a smaller and quicker collapsing probe? haaa.

    I also just want to say, that when Cory tells you he will go on a split with you and see you at the bottom… I can guarantee this. He is faster than everyone we hike with up the hill. I went up on an early season split and he broke trail and ripped up the line faster than anyone on a board, and no joke in less than what seemed to be 30 seconds had his skis broken down and was ready to shred. These were just an early version of the ski as well. While I was ripping my skins off and fiddling with my bindings, pins, and whatnot, and he had a pit dug and was ready to drop. By the way the Pack he has built, is specific to the ski and has a separate pouch which keeps the ski separate from lunch.. so whatever small particles of snow end up in there… are only cooling your juice.

    Though I think the price point is high, and maybe too high for now, do consider what you have put into your own splitboards… this sport costs money. I think we all know this. Clearly many of you opt out of season passes, or snowmobiles so you can afford this equipment and a different experience. I personally see this as bridging the gap to many resort riders, or snowmo riders. This is just another tool to use, but one none of you should write off just yet.

    I think the final argument is one that is so obvious… don’t knock it til you try it. Many of you on here just want to tear down what has been built here, or put out there. But I know with the exception of Cory… NONE of you have actually put these on your feet, so none of you can actually hold any fully weighted argument in my mind. All I know is that I have watched Cory and the maturity of this product… it is in a great place, but is still in a changing state, that will only get better.

    Keep shredding… but keep checkin in on this product. I know in my mind that this will be a huge enabler to those who cant stand riding their split in the BC, and those of us who cant stand snowshoes to get to the jump.

    See you at the top.

    #635202
    jbaysurfer
    947 Posts

    maybe he has been riding his split too much? I know for a fact I would in all instances rather ride my own board than my split. Keep arguing it, but I know personally… I prefer this option.

    TBH, it’s you making an argument with this statement, and given that your solid board is referred to as “my own board” or your “personal board” and your split doesn’t seem to garner that kind of admiration, I can see how you’d opt for the approach skis. Assuming anyone is riding any particular setup “too much” made me laugh.

    I’m not gonna say too much else, because I don’t want to rain on the parade of someone who’s trying to innovate, but I think this group of riders @ sb.com is happy enough with the performance of their splittys that they don’t have the same internal stuggle you seem to have. I guess if I ever hear JJ or XDLR or TRice say “I would do that line on my solid board, but not on my splitty” I might have a paradigmn shift, but as long as they’re slaying the lines they are on splittys, and the best riders I ride with are all riding splittys, I don’t think I’ll give it much more thought.

    The bottom line for me is, balancing comfort, and confidence with tools to help me ascend and descend. Luckily for me, there’s a snowboard that separates into approach skis that give me the comfort, confidence and toolset I need to do both. YMMV.

    Idarado, I’d like to repeat, I absolutely wish you the best of luck with your new company. Innovation and competition are never bad for a consumer. I hope two things for you 1) that the market for your product is large enough to sustain you, and 2) that you find a way to effectively target and capitalize on that market.

    Edit: Welcome to the board Idaho. Notable first post.

    #635203
    barrows
    1490 Posts

    Best of luck to Cory and the new product.
    Hint: statements like these are better avoided for obvious reasons:
    1. They ski better than any AT ski (really?)
    2. Solid boards outperform splits (with the possible exception of extreme freestyle, and, running gates, this is patently not true).
    This product does not appeal to me, as I am very satisfied with the performance of my split, and I am not going to ever adopt any system which adds to my load in the backcountry without providing any real advantage. I do think these will appeal to serious backcountry freestyle riders who need to make an approach to their riding zone through deep snow, but who want the advatage of a lighter, solid board, for easier control of spins and inverted airs. Serious freestylers are going to drop their packs, and bootpack, when trying to do serious aerial tricks.
    I do not think the price is out of line for what you get, but perjaps a no pack version for $600.00 should be considered as well-people are pretty picky about packs (I know I am).

    #635204
    nedrapier
    235 Posts

    I’m enjoying this!

    There always needs to be someone out front and charging with new ideas other people don’t get. Otherwise, where would we be? As splitboarders, as backcountry enthusiasts, human beings…
    Good luck, Cory! I would like a try some time.

    I think some people being more defensive than they need to be about their splits, and about splitboarding. There’s a thread on here asking “all things being equal, split or solid for a heli trip?” with plenty of replies saying “take the solid, why compromise when you don’t have to?” Splitboards are a compromise. A bloody brilliant compromise, for what you give up and what you get back, but it’s a compromise all the same.

    The “JJ rides heavy shit on one, so it must be good” argument isn’t totally logical either. I read up on the Marinelli Couloir (gnarly) a while ago and found a story of a girl called Victoria Jamieson doing it in on a splitboard. In 1997. That’s a heavy, heavy line and was icey as hell at the time. Must have been very sketchy, but her doing it on what she had doesn’t mean others weren’t worthy of wanting better. (as a postscript, she moved to tele’s not long after)

    Having said all that, I won’t be going for these for the moment, I’m very firmly in the late adopter camp! If I had $800 bucks floating around right now, it would either go towards trying a hardboot setup, or put towards a new split. Or something I might use more often, like a new bike!

    But who knows where we’ll all be in a couple of years’ time?

    #635205
    russman
    692 Posts

    Whoever this Mike Hardaker guy is, he must not be a function-focused backcountry user. I mean SERIOUSLY….

    http://mtnweekly.com/top-10-hottest-products-at-sia-12319

    He puts down the GoPro camera as number ONE??? Do these skis really deserve a number 4 slot? Those splitboot mountaineer boards sure do hamper performance 😉

    Hmmmmmmm, questions questions!

    #635206
    idarado
    69 Posts

    I don’t know Mike Hardaker, it’s unsolicited press. But perhaps he rated it in his top 10 because he’s actually seen the product.

    #635207
    Ecobrad
    2068 Posts

    I think the press is awesome and proves to me that its not just him and his and his bros stoked on the approach skis. Congrats dude. You’ve got an sweet project and I give you credit for pushing this far! That takes balls. If, over a bit of time, these things prove to be worth the dough I’ll be all over them.

    @idarado wrote:

    I don’t know Mike Hardaker, it’s unsolicited press. But perhaps he rated it in his top 10 because he’s actually seen the product.

    #635208
    shredgnar
    643 Posts

    @Idaho wrote:

    I am also a photographer, I often ride with upwards of 20 pounds of camera equipment, and tripods on my back, so those people that freak out about seven pounds on their back kind of make me laugh.

    Yeah, but do you ride for fun with 20 pounds of photog gear on your back? Let’s see you huck with that amount of gear on your back. That’s the point, an extra 7 pounds on your back can make a difference, honestly, I like to go as light as possible. I’ve hauled 40 lbs on my back skinning and riding on overnight trips. It ain’t fun. If I had to add a board to that I wouldn’t have made it very far. Especially in deep snow on mini skis.

    I’m all for these contraptions, it’ll be interesting to see where it goes. I’m not shelling out $800 for them but if the price comes down I might consider them in the future. I can think of a few local tours where they might be better than a split.

    I used to be in the group who thought that splits didn’t ride as well as a solid board. I had a Prior Kyber. It sucked. It got better when I got sparks, but the board itself just didn’t do it for me. This year I got a Solution. I honestly like riding it better than my solid board. The thing rips. I’ve ridden it in and out of bounds and the only difference is that it’s a little heavier but that’s kinda nice for busting through crud.

    The approach ski concept is not a new one, I know people who have been using them for years. SOme people swear by them. That’s cool. These are an improvement in that concept and method of travel for sure. I just don’t think that method of travel is optimal. Neither is the split, yet.

    #635209
    powslash
    382 Posts

    Agree with others that the price needs to come down to snowshoe level. How about just sell the hinges alone? A jigsaw and some old skis/snowboards, bam, approach skis for a price that is in line with how much use they will get.

    Or make them out of plastic with a honeycomb core. Something that rides in the pack on the way down doesn’t need to be handmade precious. Or foam core…

    I would use these for my Winterstick ST or powsurfs but not at that price point.

    #635210
    Meng
    22 Posts

    Interesting to see so many say their splits ride like as well as their solids against Idarados’ statement that they don’t. I’m in the same boat as him. I have a new factory split with sparks. It’s the best split I’ve ever had, rides amazingly, does everything I want…while on the ground or just dropping smaller cliffs, pillows, tree floaters etc. Fine on hard steep, everything. But seriously, the feel, pop, snappyness etc… will never compare with my RC NS Legacy with CO2’s. I mean, with all of the hardware, extra weight of the baseplate and inside edge etc its seemingly impossible. If I were going out to just session a jump or pillow lines or cliffs, I would definitely prefer my solid board even though I have what I consider to be the absolute best in current split tech. That being said, 99% of my bc days are longer tours to mountain descents hitting lines with some features. My split is the only appropriate tool for this and I love it. I would be terrified on those approach skis in many of the areas I skin (do they have heel lifts?). That being said, If i found the time to get out and just access a cool pillow zone or jump, these would be great to have and make more sense than a split. Or, if you lived in a zone of only short tours, they could be great. Different tools for different activities…. In any case, I am gonna wrap this up because I am about to go splitboarding. For reals!

    #635211
    sickpow
    46 Posts

    Best point on here below.

    I saw these in person at SIA. Really nice looking…too nice for the tool they should be.

    Bottom line is, these were needed maybe 5 years ago, but now they are for hiking folks, or to replace snowshoes…..which even at 350 is pushing it for the weight.

    finishing a boot pack with almost 20lbs on your back….silly.

    Sign me up for a pair after the returns from shops spring 2013. I guarantee these will not sell many for 800, or even 450.

    If i were a guy with the engineering skills like the guys from mtnapproach, I would have designed better splitboards as we all know, splitboards ARE the answer.

    @powslash wrote:

    Agree with others that the price needs to come down to snowshoe level. How about just sell the hinges alone? A jigsaw and some old skis/snowboards, bam, approach skis for a price that is in line with how much use they will get.

    Or make them out of plastic with a honeycomb core. Something that rides in the pack on the way down doesn’t need to be handmade precious. Or foam core…

    I would use these for my Winterstick ST or powsurfs but not at that price point.

    #635212
    jbaysurfer
    947 Posts

    @nedrapier wrote:

    The “JJ rides heavy shit on one, so it must be good” argument isn’t totally logical either.

    Since I was the one to present a variation of this argument I feel compelled to point out that I never said this. I merely said that I don’t see ripper boarders, or hear them…talking about not doing a line because they don’t have a solid board with them. To me that means splits have progressed to the point that they inspire (or at least fail to inhibit) the confidence to do anything, amongst the best riders in the world.

    The most important part of my rationale was that the best riders I ride with, doing the most difficult lines they do…are doing them on Splitboards. Also, the steepest lines I’ve ever done were done on my split, and I don’t look back and wish I were on my Custom X.

    I had a hard time following your logic when you mentioned that Vic Jamieson did Marinelli on her splitty, yet somehow that means a solid is better?

    I guess we all make leaps of logic for the purposes of illustrating our arguments.

    ……just wanted to clarify.

    #635213
    Wasatch_Don
    101 Posts

    I’m obviously not in the target demographic for this product because I can’t think of a single day in my 50+ days of riding last year where I would have preferred to be on a pair of approach skis with a board on my back.

    I spent years carrying a resort board around and I can honestly say that if it wasn’t for splitboarding I would be riding AT gear right now. I must be the only person who has to hike up through the trees while the stupid board on my back knocks snow on my head. I’m also the only guy who hates that same stupid board catching gusts of wind on the ridge making for epic pucker on sketch spots.

    Do I think solid boards ride better? Sure do. Do I think that soft boots and bindings ride better? Sure do. However, that doesn’t mean I want to give up my dynafit toe pieces and hardboots for 10k+ days. I’m willing to comprimise some downhill performance to be able to get out into the backcountry and ski what I want. It’s not like you see skiers wearing carbon AT boots at the resort… but you do see them in the backcountry… we all make comprises.

    So yeah, I think there’s a market for this type of product… but not at that price. I think your market is people that want to ski <4k days and not shell out the money for a splitboard, too bad your product is almost as expensive as a splitboard. If anything, your product is a stepping stone to ridig splits not a competitor. Trying to position it as a reasonable alternative to touring on a splitboard just makes your product look silly. Start competing with snowshoes and verts and you might have a shot.

    The hardcore riders that are shelling out the big bucks are going to keep buying splitboards. I look at the AT ski industry and compare it to backcountry boarding and can’t help but think we’re headed in exactly the wrong direction.

    Maybe people that ride monoskis would be more interested?

    #635214
    shredgnar
    643 Posts

    @Wasatch_Don wrote:

    Maybe people that ride monoskis would be more interested?

    That’s cracking me up. What if there was a group of hard-core monoskiers with split monoskis and dynafits. That would be some funny shit!

    Somebody made the point that these are more of an improved snowshoe and should be marketed as such. I agree, these look way better than snowshoes because you could glide. I saw some snowshoers yesterday on a tour, they were on a fire road used mostly by xc skiers. I couldn’t help but think of these appch skis and how they would probably be having way more fun if they had these.

    BTW, a few more observations: Do these have crampons?
    How are they at side hilling? I know they have full wrap edges but will the binding offer any lateral support? Not that split bindings do either but these bindings look even more minimal than sparks.

    I too agree that the custom pack should be an option. I’m picky about my packs and mine also has a built in avalung. My other pack is a 40L, my other is a 60L, and I have a few daypacks. Point is, one pack with a few custom pockets is gonna be left in the closet. So why should I pay for it? Why not bring the price down a bit and make the pack an option?

    This is all constructive criticism, the designer and his buddies should take it as that and not get defensive about it. It’s free advice.

    #635215
    russman
    692 Posts

    @Wasatch_Don wrote:

    …………

    I spent years carrying a resort board around and I can honestly say that if it wasn’t for splitboarding I would be riding AT gear right now. I must be the only person who has to hike up through the trees while the stupid board on my back knocks snow on my head. I’m also the only guy who hates that same stupid board catching gusts of wind on the ridge making for epic pucker on sketch spots.

    Completely agree! I almost threw in the can a few years ago and [almost] switched to tele! And then I saw this splitboard chick way up on Mt Rainier one day…….she was blonde, gorgeous, and incredibly……EFFICIENT. Oh man, efficiency gets me every time! Anyway, that changed everything.

    @Wasatch_Don wrote:

    Do I think solid boards ride better? Sure do. Do I think that soft boots and bindings ride better? Sure do. However, that doesn’t mean I want to give up my dynafit toe pieces and hardboots for 10k+ days. I’m willing to comprimise some downhill performance to be able to get out into the backcountry and ski what I want. It’s not like you see skiers wearing carbon AT boots at the resort… but you do see them in the backcountry… we all make comprises.

    Karakoram binders….. COUGH COUGH….. Oops, did I just say that out loud?

    I’ve already pissed off a few people on here by being so exuberantly stoked on Karakoram bindings, but I don’t care, I’m STILL STOKED!

    As a rider who has both a park/jib AND alpine slogging background, I can honestly say that splitboards ARE NOT COMPROMISES. If anything, my setup is a riding enhancement. Not even going to get into the hardboot debate here… But with a soft snowboard mountaineering boot, you really can have the best of ALL worlds 😉

    The only reason I don’t slide my splitboard down rails in the park is because she is my baby. Not because she doesn’t do it just as well as my solid board with Cartel Bindings.

    The amazing thing to me, is that splitboards are potentially far more diverse than AT setups. I mean, my best AT buddy literally has 14 pairs of skis! One for each kind of snow and riding style! I have 2 splitboards, and a solid…. And end up riding 1 board all the time. Inbounds, out of bounds, way up in the mountains…. it doesn’t matter. As I said, I’ve done everything from backside boardslides and spins in the park to riding steep summer glacier ice all on the same setup. Its truly amazing how well rounded this tool is. Compromised performance isn’t even an afterthought.

    And think about this: Splitboard setups are soon to weigh less than 10 pounds total. Dynafits + Skis + Boots = about 10-11 pounds.

    Not to sound like I’m hating on approach skis (really, I’m not) but there’s just no way in hell I’d ever digress away from splitboard technology. The splitty allows you to have 1 piece of equipment that can potentially do everything extraordinarily well (including icy side-hilling). With approach skis you’re still lugging around the same ol’ clumsiness, and still getting killed by AT skiers. Sorry….. really trying NOT to piss anyone off today….

    #635216
    UTAH
    830 Posts

    I can’t believe this shits gone 5 pages. You guys need to get off your arm chairs and go ride. Shit, if your snowpacks that bad go shred a sk8 park or find some waves.

    #635217
    russman
    692 Posts

    You are on the computer too, UTAH.

    #635218
    wasatch surf
    979 Posts

    I think the point is why is there a 5 page discussion on approach skis on SPLITBOARD.COM, what is it 2001 again?

    point is most serious splitboarders(not that i include myself in that category) won’t really be interested in a product like this, but there are 4 times as many bro/bras wanting to ride the slackcountry, teton pass, build booters etc.. and these approach skis are great for them. and like I said before seems like a good solution for no-boarding. and today is my designated armchair jockey day since it’s blowing 50mph+

    #635219
    shredgnar
    643 Posts

    @UTAH wrote:

    I can’t believe this shits gone 5 pages. You guys need to get off your arm chairs and go ride. Shit, if your snowpacks that bad go shred a sk8 park or find some waves.

    Some people have responsibilities which involve the internet which causes them to drink coffee and procrastinate on these forums 🙄

    These same people get out and ride quite a bit. 3K vert yesterday will hold me over. 😉

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