Forums Splitboard Talk Forum A new reason to bring your dog into the backcountry
Viewing 20 posts - 41 through 60 (of 62 total)
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  • #586411
    OldMan
    24 Posts

    If you feel so strongly about not taking dogs into sensitive ecosystems, why does the model of disruption by dogs to the predator/prey relationship not also apply to you traveling into such areas on your split? Does a skin track not make ingress/egress easier for predator/prey? If not, why not? Have you ever gone back to your previous skin track and seen wildlife tracks follow them? Have you thought that skier density may have more of an effect on the predator/prey relationship than the presence of a dog? What about route selection to avoid contact all together?

    When it comes down to it, all of this is simply anecdotal evidence. I haven’t seen a scientific study that says dogs in the BC during winter months have an impact on T&E species (e.g., mountain caribou, lynx, etc.) migration/land use/population. If you have, I’d love to read it. Until then, all we have are our individual conceptual models–biased by our perceptions–of the effect that dogs have on wildlife. It is simply your opinion which may or may not reflect reality.

    BTW, I don’t think there’s anyone that enjoys getting crap on their skins.

    #586412
    Killclimbz
    1165 Posts

    @oldman wrote:

    If you feel so strongly about not taking dogs into sensitive ecosystems, why does the model of disruption by dogs to the predator/prey relationship not also apply to you traveling into such areas on your split? Does a skin track not make ingress/egress easier for predator/prey? If not, why not? Have you ever gone back to your previous skin track and seen wildlife tracks follow them? Have you thought that skier density may have more of an effect on the predator/prey relationship than the presence of a dog? What about route selection to avoid contact all together?

    When it comes down to it, all of this is simply anecdotal evidence. I haven’t seen a scientific study that says dogs in the BC during winter months have an impact on T&E species (e.g., mountain caribou, lynx, etc.) migration/land use/population. If you have, I’d love to read it. Until then, all we have are our individual conceptual models–biased by our perceptions–of the effect that dogs have on wildlife. It is simply your opinion which may or may not reflect reality.

    BTW, I don’t think there’s anyone that enjoys getting crap on their skins.

    #586413
    the mighty bighorn
    126 Posts

    Yeah, this is exactly why I dont post long messages in forums. It never fails that you’ll get called names when you stick your neck out (nazi, hypocrite, preacher so on).

    Few of us ever consider how many players are involved with public lands. Logging, mining, pipelines, transmission lines, highways, parks, hunters, snowmobilers, ATV’s,etc. Combined our impacts are tremendous. If every land user were to make small contributions and compromise thier positions in minor ways, there is no doubt we could have healthy wildlife populations. Is leaving your dog at home too much to ask, if in return you can ride the powder in the BC?. Not if you ask me.

    It’s so easy to point out all the damage that others are doing without looking at ourselves.

    #586414
    48steps
    39 Posts

    there is a good dog beacon thread on the couloir forum…try this link…

    http://www.telemarkskier.com/cgi-bin/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=001746#000000

    #586415
    Killclimbz
    1165 Posts

    @the mighty bighorn wrote:

    Yeah, this is exactly why I dont post long messages in forums. It never fails that you’ll get called names when you stick your neck out (nazi, hypocrite, preacher so on).

    Few of us ever consider how many players are involved with public lands. Logging, mining, pipelines, transmission lines, highways, parks, hunters, snowmobilers, ATV’s,etc. Combined our impacts are tremendous. If every land user were to make small contributions and compromise thier positions in minor ways, there is no doubt we could have healthy wildlife populations. Is leaving your dog at home too much to ask, if in return you can ride the powder in the BC?. Not if you ask me.

    It’s so easy to point out all the damage that others are doing without looking at ourselves.

    I don’t disagree and you brought up some valid points. I will definitely consider when and if I traveling in areas where wildlife could be adversly affected by my pooch. Fact of the matter I do not travel in terrain where wildlife is harrased by my dog. Period end of story.
    So when I am in Canada and I am traveling in park land where there are Caribou herds in nesting in the winter I will not bring my dog.
    Dog’s also deserve a certain amount of excersize and to not be holed up in a crate or house all day too. I choose to take him with me in an area where it is accetable to have him.

    #586416
    OldMan
    24 Posts

    If every land user were to make small contributions and compromise thier positions in minor ways, there is no doubt we could have healthy wildlife populations.

    MBH, I agree with you 100%.
    Consciousness and compromise will keep the forest open for us all. I think that starts with understanding and accepting the impacts I make when I choose to play in the forest.

    #586417
    utahgirl
    28 Posts

    @killclimbz wrote:

    I don’t disagree and you brought up some valid points. I will definitely consider when and if I traveling in areas where wildlife could be adversly affected by my pooch. Fact of the matter I do not travel in terrain where wildlife is harrased by my dog. Period end of story.
    So when I am in Canada and I am traveling in park land where there are Caribou herds in nesting in the winter I will not bring my dog.
    Dog’s also deserve a certain amount of excersize and to not be holed up in a crate or house all day too. I choose to take him with me in an area where it is accetable to have him.

    Amen. Could not have said it better.

    #586418
    sweetlou270
    44 Posts

    I got some poop on my skins this weekend, but I think it was mine

    #586419
    Killclimbz
    1165 Posts

    @sweetlou270 wrote:

    I got some poop on my skins this weekend, but I think it was mine

    Was that cause you were shitting your pants? 😆

    #586420
    sweetlou270
    44 Posts

    crapping myself over how cold it was Fri & Sat….JESUS!

    #586421
    Killclimbz
    1165 Posts

    Yeah, no kidding. We tried to go out to No Name. Before we even got to the foot of Russel everyone’s exposed skin was turning white. Even covering up your face didn’t quite do it. Frigg’in cold. So cold in fact I opted to go rockclimbing in the sun on Sunday. Needed a little change up, back to snowboarding this weekend.

    #586422
    sweetlou270
    44 Posts

    I was riding Chair lifts w/ some out of town buddies, so I didn’t get to take advantage of the better avy conditions….but….form the sounds of it the tour would’ve been BRUTAL!

    #586423
    Killclimbz
    1165 Posts

    Fokking cold. In fact it was so bad that 3 of us were having problems with skins freezing. I was using my new split and new skins and even though they were new, the glue was freezingup. Good thing I have voile straps. My one buddy wasn’t so prepared and his skins finally blew out on his AT ski’s. He had a complete global thermal nucluer meltdown. It was freaking hilarious. Throwing his poles and skis into the rocks. It was frigg’in hard for me to not laugh out loud. Damn, I am smiling right now thinking about it. Good stuff.

    #586424
    sweetlou270
    44 Posts

    nice…

    what kind of board did you get?

    and for the rest of you….I’m not very good at this forum stuff…..is this what you’d call thread drift?

    Sorry

    #586425
    knucklesplitter
    340 Posts

    Solution for unexpected loss skin adhesion – duct tape. Don’t leave home without it.

    #586426
    Killclimbz
    1165 Posts

    @knucklesplitter wrote:

    Solution for unexpected loss skin adhesion – duct tape. Don’t leave home without it.

    It was so cold duct tape wasn’t sticking. People had it with them. Voile straps are the way to go. I think I am going to buy a couple more. They really saved my bacon that day.

    #586427
    Killclimbz
    1165 Posts

    @sweetlou270 wrote:

    nice…

    what kind of board did you get?

    and for the rest of you….I’m not very good at this forum stuff…..is this what you’d call thread drift?

    Sorry

    I ended up buying another 166 Voile SD. It was on sale at the downtown REI for $559, I couldn’t pass it up for that price. It was the last one. Turns out Derm’s wife bought the last 159 there too. They are now officially out of splitboards at the Downtown REI.

    #586428
    knucklesplitter
    340 Posts

    Which Voilé straps are you speaking of?

    #586429
    Killclimbz
    1165 Posts

    You can find them here.

    #586430
    ssattler
    77 Posts

    check it…

    http://www.nwac.us/text_version/Gold_creek_01_27_02.htm

    I know this is totally nuts, but this woman was buried back in 2002 out here in WA and her dog dug her out of the slide.

    The report above is from the NWAC site, and was investigated by NWAC.

    Interesting.

    I consider myself, and my dog as a cohesive unit. We’re family. If we enter a wilderness together, our collective presence is what disturbs (or enhances) the environment. Its not the dog, its both of us. What we choose to do (go up and down hills on a snowboard and on paws) changes little in the overall ebb and flow of a BC ecosystem. I don’t buy into the argument that the presence of a dog for a few short hours in a BC environment impacts caribou herds, or bear migration, or whatever.

    Those statements are ridiculous, and applying any sort of observational study to prove those claims would be exceedingly difficult.

    A dog belongs in the BC as much as I do.

    If you stopped me on the trail to give me a hard time about my dog, I’d probably tell you to fuck off.

Viewing 20 posts - 41 through 60 (of 62 total)

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