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  • #581474
    jimw
    1421 Posts

    Nice! You’re getting all kinds of good lines this year. Those Dana Plateau chutes are on my list this year… just wish it wasn’t such a haul from SC. Glad you were able to hit them in primo conditions! Any bets on when 120 opens through Tioga Pass?

    #581463
    jimw
    1421 Posts

    Depends which route you do. For west face, June is probably the latest you’d want to go. Late May is probably prime time for that area. On the eastside however, you can sometimes get good turns into August! Though July is more typically when it starts to turn sour. The eastside is nice because you avoid the crowds, and it can be a nice run straight from the summit. Though west face is nice too.

    Useful links:

    http://www.shastaavalanche.org/advisory.htm
    http://www.shastaavalanche.org/reports.htm

    #581456
    jimw
    1421 Posts

    Another place I use ’em sometimes is on the way out from overnight trips, when I’ve got the big unweildy pack on. They help keep things stable on the way down. They actually help with turn initiation just like skiing. Don’t knock it till you’ve tried it. 🙂 Though, I don’t think I’d let myself be seen with ’em at a resort…

    #581340
    jimw
    1421 Posts

    Nice pics! What a difference a day makes, looks like the powder was even more amazing than Sat.

    #581328
    jimw
    1421 Posts

    Yeah, the SD is a totally different camera from the S series. It has different menu options etc. It uses a different processing chip, and is general much faster than the S series. For example, it opens and is ready to take a picture faster. Important for getting those “capture the moment” shots.

    #581324
    jimw
    1421 Posts

    I was just going to recommend the SD300. Looks like they already have new models (SD400, SD500). Ah, the relentless march of technology. Anyway, I have been totally happy with the SD300. It is so small, it is easy to take it anywhere and just slip it in a pocket. Consequently, I end up taking more pictures than if it was a pain to get out of the pack each time. It takes great photos for being so small. The movie mode is excellent – full 30 fps at 640×480, only limit to length of clips is the size of the mem card. It also has a *60 fps* mode at 320×240, which is useful for taking movies of action sequences to analyze later. It also has a burst mode, though it’s not as fast as some other cameras there (like the Minoltas I think). It’s got a nice large screen. I had the S500 and returned it because I tried a friend’s SD300 and just liked it way better.

    #581019
    jimw
    1421 Posts

    My only comment to add to this flame-fest is… Verts rule!! 🙂 (for anything the splitboard can’t handle)

    #581137
    jimw
    1421 Posts

    To expand a bit on some of bcd’s points and add some more:

    – On my split fish, I used only wood screws/epoxy for the touring brackets. Time will tell if this is strong enough, but I couldn’t get myself to stick those huge t-bolts on the bottom. So far it is working fine. Though I do carry some instant epoxy with me on trips… Before doing this I called Voile, and the person I talked to seemed to think that wood screws ought to work. I used #12 x 5/8″ wood screws, and had to grind them down so that they would only go down to the top of the p-tex layer. I measured the depth and drilled the holes with a drill press using a 5/32″ bit. Started the screws using one of the un-ground screws. Used epoxy in the holes. This method seems to work great!

    – For lining up the pucks, you can take two straightedge pieces of wood, and use clamps to clamp them to the sides of the slider pucks. That way you know they are straight, then you just line up the holes with the hole pattern. Keep the whole contraption together until after you’ve put the screws in – the pucks can move when you put the screws in.

    – Wear gloves when making the cut. Mask, glasses, and protective clothing are a good idea too. Bits of fiberglass will fly when cutting. I noticed them later on my hands and arms. Felt like little invisible splinters.

    – If you have a wraparound edge, score the edges at the tip and tail first.

    – Countersinking the holes for the pivoting hooks was tricky. The countersink bit didn’t want to drill a perfectly round hole, and it tended to veer off-center. Might have been easier with drill press.

    – I used several coats of spray-on varathane to seal the cut edge. Some of it ended up getting on the topsheet – I removed that with acetone.

    – The instructions included in the kit were for older hardware. The PDF I got online was correct. However there were a couple things in the new PDF that were omitted (“use your toe for assembly and disassembly of the board”). I kind of combined the kit instructions, the online PDF, the Couloir article, and tips I got from various forum members.

    – I must have gotten two sets of the same pucks in the kit (both regular) instead of one regular and one goofy, because they all look exactly the same. If I tried to use them to set up for goofy they wouldn’t work. So check that when you receive the kit if you’re goofy.

    – The balance point of the board is affected by the hardware that is going to be put on. This is one reason I’d recommend installing the touring bracket/heel lift last. I had everything installed except these. I put them on the board on top of the paper template, then put a wooden rod under the board. With this I could easily find the balance point. I moved the pivot point on the touring brackets such that they were about 1/2″ ahead of the balance point of the board. My Burton was about 1″ ahead of the balance point; a friend’s homemade Voile split was about 1/4″ ahead or so. Interestingly, the Couloir article specifically recommends putting the pivot point 1/4″ *behind* the balance point, so that the tip of the ski drops down when you lift your foot. This seems to me to be the opposite of what you’d want. Also, see the note below regarding crampons.

    – The paper template for the touring bracket and heel block/climbing bar seemed to be a bit off. I used the template for the holes, but after installing the hardware it looked like the heel block should ideally be about 1/8″ further back. The slider plate just barely lands in the correct contact area of the heel pad; it almost touches the raised border at the back of this area. The heel lift also has about 1/4″ of room toward the back of the slider plate. I also ran into some related problems with the crampons.

    – Speaking of crampons, if you plan on using them, you might want to get them before starting the process to make sure everything is going to line up. In my split kit there were separate L and R crampons, though I believe they may have switched to side-independent ones this year. Anyway, you want to make sure they are going to clear the edges of the ski side-to-side, which may affect the centering of the touring brackets, particularly if you have a wide board. If you have crampons, I’d recommend positioning the hardware by doing the following:

    1) Find pivot point for touring bracket as described above. Then attach crampon to touring bracket and locate side-to-side position for touring bracket. Make sure the crampon is straight along the cut (straight) edge of the board. This will give you the correct location for the touring bracket. Mark the hole locations, drill and install screws (you’ll remove/epoxy/reinstall them later).

    2) With the crampon attached to the touring bracket, place the tabbed shim into the tab on the crampon. This gives you the correct location for the heel pad. Mark the hole locations, drill and install screws. Now check that the crampon works correctly in both fixed and mobile modes (it should).

    3) At this point, remove the screws, epoxy the holes, and reinstall the screws.

    4) If you don’t have crampons, then I would just center the touring bracket side-to-side, and attach the slider plate, making sure it is parallel to the straight edge of the board. Mark the hole locations, drill and install screws. The crampons should fit if you get them later, as long as the ski is not too wide for them (which you can’t do anything about anyway). Once the touring bracket is installed, attach the slider plate and put the heel pad and shim under the slider plate, centering it side-to-side and positioning it such that the end of the slider plate contacts the pad about 1/8″ in from the raised back edge of the heel pad. Then mark the hole locations, drill and install. You could probably also use the paper templates, but I’d recommend moving the heel pad location back about 1/8″, and drilling/installing the touring bracket first and double-checking the heel pad location before drilling.

    #580701
    jimw
    1421 Posts

    Nice. I’ve definitely been doing more mtn biking than bc stuff. PM me know if you ever want to hook up for a ride. I live on Empire Grade right by all the great UCSC trails. A lot quicker than driving 4 hours to Tahoe. 🙂

    #580620
    jimw
    1421 Posts

    Nice TR and photos. Holy shit breadbox, that is a HUGE air! Nice! First we had the “Should bcrider chill out?” thread… now maybe we need the “Should breadbox chill out and stop making the rest of us look bad” thread. 🙂

    Seriously, looks like a good time was had by all. Hope to get out there with you guys one of these days…

    #580608
    jimw
    1421 Posts

    @digdug wrote:

    i think i know the answer already, but that 4-5 yr old burton supermodel would be the schizz-nit to cut, right?

    Probably… just be sure to use a carbide blade, and don’t freak out at the heinous wailing sound produced by cutting through the inserts. Wear appropriate protection (eye, skin, lungs, anything else you want to protect from tiny flying fiberglass particles).

    #580581
    jimw
    1421 Posts

    BCR, you rock! Great job. ttips is starting to get too congested anyway. 🙂 I knew there was a reason I didn’t write up trip reports from a couple summer trips yet…

Viewing 12 posts - 1,321 through 1,332 (of 1,332 total)