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 Post subject: Newbie here looking at AT boots
PostPosted: Sat Nov 19, 2005 12:40 pm 
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Joined: Fri Oct 14, 2005 10:00 pm
Posts: 19
Location: Denver
Greetings folks. I'm a newbie to splitboarding (just got a m-gun '71) and I'm pretty charged @ not using snowshoes this season.

I want to go w/ AT boots on the 'gun and was looking for a little advice.

I was wondering @ fit. Do I want them cranked as tight as ski boots or can I get away w/ a little more comfortable fit? I was thinking @ the Scarpa Matrix for a lightweight possible option.

Any suggestions or tips?

thanks much

BN - btw, regarding the screen name, I do not mean to offend anyone, I simply work out... rather a lot.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Nov 19, 2005 1:36 pm 
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Joined: Wed Dec 01, 2004 12:45 pm
Posts: 158
Location: Reno
Bodynazi,

Too bad you don't live in the Tahoe area, cause I'm looking for a training partner...

Anyway, i use At boots, and here are my thoughts:

It depends on how you plan to use them. In my mind, there are two different techniques that you see: 1. AT boots used as replacements for soft boots; 2. AT boots used as replacements for snowboard hard boots.

If you're trying to bascally mimick the soft-boot style (stance, technique, etc...), then it seems like you would want the softest AT boot you can find. I would also guess that you could wear them a little loose, to offer more room to initiate turns in your ankles. You will also probably want a soft binding like the Voile Mtn. Plate... I never had much fun trying it this way.

If you can commit to steeper angles and learn how to initiate turs from your hips, like a hard-boot rider, then you will want to keep the boots as snug as possible. You will also find yourself wanting a more stiff, responsive binding like the Bomber, Splitboard Binding.

Since you're going to be trying AT boots, I would highly reccomend trying out a "carver" stance on a solid board, or on your splitboard... It is unquestionably different from the soft-boot style, but it is the most effective use of a hard, plastic AT boot.

If you're commited to lower stance angles and the soft-boot style, i wouldn't bother switching to AT boots. Soft snowboard boots or mountaineering boots like the La Sportiva Nuptse work fine with strap bindings... unless you plan on climbing at extremely high altitudes... in which cas, you just need to suck it up and get AT boots.

Zach

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Nov 19, 2005 1:37 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 01, 2005 3:11 pm
Posts: 122
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Right so... as with most boots... fit is the key.

Scarpa makes great boots but they don't fit my funny shaped feet. I bought Dynafit TLT700's, apparently a good guess judging by some of the responses around here (I was initially concerned that they weren't light enough even with a thermo liner) from people who are stronger BC snowboarders than me. All of them seem to favor AT boots, and last season I figured out why.

You lose the surfy feel to some degree, but your knees don't get trashed as bad on traverses, and kick turns are easier. Plus obviously you get more fine control. Last season I used a pair of Nuptses, and I'll probably use them this season too, when the powder is deep or climbing of high standard. But, the AT boots are definitely a good choice for the gun. Prior to taking up split boarding, I had always used a carving board and hard boots, and while I liked the surfy feel of softboots in powder, I missed the control of hard boots.

The bottom line is that if you get AT boots that fit YOUR FOOT correctly, and preferably stuff a thermo liner in them (whether it comes with them or not), you are going to be very happy. The non-DH-specific AT boots almost all have a very generous walk/ski switch which you can flip to "walk" if you want a more relaxed ankle flex, or you can drill a bunch of holes in the tongue to soften it up more. (Or if you really want soft flex you can swap in your soft boots...) The fit is the key though.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Nov 19, 2005 6:38 pm 
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Joined: Fri Oct 14, 2005 10:00 pm
Posts: 19
Location: Denver
thanks for the beta guys - I need to get to Bentgate & REI and try on their AT boots. I do plan on kicking the angles steeper over my 'typical' board stance. I have backcountry boarded in my ice cilmbing boots (Scarpa Alpahs and Solomen Super Mt Guide 9s) but that was w/ strap-in bindings - and control on crud or hard pack is lacking at best w/ the shorter boot. The AT boots will be 100x better for boot packing up slopes too vs soft boots.

Regarding bindings, I was going to use the Voile AT bindings - Zach - do you think the bombers are that much better?

thanks again.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Nov 19, 2005 8:01 pm 
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Joined: Fri Nov 12, 2004 1:43 pm
Posts: 439
Location: Western Washington
I ride Bomber TD2's inbounds on race sticks. I've handled the splitboard binding and have ridden the Voile Mtn. Plate. I promise you the difference is night and day for durability and stiffness.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Nov 19, 2005 8:13 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 01, 2005 3:11 pm
Posts: 122
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Zach wrote:

If you're commited to lower stance angles and the soft-boot style, i wouldn't bother switching to AT boots. Soft snowboard boots or mountaineering boots like the La Sportiva Nuptse work fine with strap bindings... unless you plan on climbing at extremely high altitudes... in which cas, you just need to suck it up and get AT boots.



This is an interesting point. After riding carving boards for years, I literally could not bring myself to ride on anything more 'relaxed' than 40 front / 20 back. It felt like I was losing all my leverage and having to throw the board around with my feet, which is just so very wrong...

Also, the Nuptses were purpose-built for 8000m climbs and as you know there are few boots in existence that are much warmer (Oly Mons, Everest, Scarpa 9000s) which all cost a multiple of what the Nuptses do. I'd want the control of AT boots for sure, and the lateral stiffness on traverses, but it's not like the boots aren't going to be warm enough.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Nov 20, 2005 9:58 am 
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Joined: Wed Dec 01, 2004 12:45 pm
Posts: 158
Location: Reno
ttriche wrote:
Zach wrote:

If you're commited to lower stance angles and the soft-boot style, i wouldn't bother switching to AT boots. Soft snowboard boots or mountaineering boots like the La Sportiva Nuptse work fine with strap bindings... unless you plan on climbing at extremely high altitudes... in which cas, you just need to suck it up and get AT boots.



This is an interesting point. After riding carving boards for years, I literally could not bring myself to ride on anything more 'relaxed' than 40 front / 20 back. It felt like I was losing all my leverage and having to throw the board around with my feet, which is just so very wrong...

Also, the Nuptses were purpose-built for 8000m climbs and as you know there are few boots in existence that are much warmer (Oly Mons, Everest, Scarpa 9000s) which all cost a multiple of what the Nuptses do. I'd want the control of AT boots for sure, and the lateral stiffness on traverses, but it's not like the boots aren't going to be warm enough.


Boots are not necesarily the concern that I was pointing to for altitude... should have been more clear:
1. AT boots can definitely be warm enough for any altitude... with the right liners and overboots, you'll be fine... The Nuptses are nice in that you rarely/never need an overboot.

2. The real problem with using mountaineering boots and strp bindings at altitude is the binding. I wouldn't pur a whole lot of faith in the plastics used in strap bindings, after repeated exposure to the harsh temperature ranges and intense solar radiation that you experience at altitude.

Also, I can't imagine myself trying to sit down or bend over and fiddle with straps at 8000 meters... no way. Simplicity is what it's all about up there. Step in, reach down, flip a bail... simple, fast and mindless. Too many things can go wrong with straps. Remember, up there you're doing good to be able to remember your name or figure out what 2 + 3 equals, in under 5 minutes.

Another cool advantage of plate bindings is that you can step into them without taking off your overboots.... This beats any system hands-down... even AT bindings. I've watched altitude addled skiers try to take off their overboots fast enough to get into their bindings and start descending before they get frostbite... if it wasn't so scary, it would have been funny.

Zach

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Nov 21, 2005 9:25 am 
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Joined: Thu Nov 18, 2004 6:52 am
Posts: 17
Location: Stuttgart, Germany, Europe
I'm using quite old Dynafit boots with 38/18 angles. On powder days I don't close the upper buckle when going down. In that mode the feeling is somewhere in the middle between a hard and a soft boot. To be more precise - the forward flexibilty is like a softboot and the sideward flexibility is more like a hardboot. And since I'm using a dynafit interface for split mode I have some canting between the slider track and the binding (Don't try that on normal voile setup ;-) )

Regarding the Scarpa Matrix: Last year they produced two different walk/ski mode switches: One comes with two positions (flexible and fixed) and the other one with three positions: flexible, fixed and "only back lean fixed". (I believe they call "ski soft"). That mode seems to be perfect for splitboarding.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Nov 23, 2005 1:19 pm 
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Joined: Fri Oct 14, 2005 10:00 pm
Posts: 19
Location: Denver
Thanks for the beta folks. I picked up a pr. of Scarpa Matrix last night. Snug, comfy, and pretty light compared to other models of AT boots. Pretty charged to try them out. Now I have to worry @ gouging the new board w/ early season conditions.

praying for snow in CO.


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 Post subject: Dynafit TLTs
PostPosted: Tue Dec 13, 2005 12:33 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 08, 2005 11:55 pm
Posts: 87
Location: Seattle, WA
i'd like to re-awaken the discussion about Dynafit TLTs for splitboarding.

What I've gathered from this board is that they are very light, and fairly 'soft', at least adjustable to 'soft' which helps for a more softboot-type stance, lower binding angles etc...

Any thoughts from folks using these boots?

Right now...the $500 + is going to either a pait of TLTs vs Scarpa F1s

Gotta pull the trigger soon and go riding.

Your thoughts would be appreciated.

Scott


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Dec 13, 2005 2:35 pm 
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Joined: Thu Oct 06, 2005 4:54 pm
Posts: 88
Location: seattle
$500! ouch.

have you shopped around for something used? in seattle we have second ascent and the junk bin at marmot in bellevue. it comes to mind because the older style lighter AT boots seem well suited for boarding and there are often pairs kicking around, ebay too if you know your shell size.

i got lucky and found the old tlt 3's for pretty cheap at second ascent.

from what i've heard the f1's are even stiffer than lasers. i have a pair of lasers for skiing but think they would be too stiff for boarding, although i know other people use 'em.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Dec 13, 2005 4:21 pm 
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Joined: Fri Sep 02, 2005 6:59 pm
Posts: 43
Location: WA Backcountry
I've been riding the TLTs for the past year. I was using Garmont GSMs before that. The Dynafits are much lighter, and softer. I ride a fairly wide stance, and the GSMs are stiff enough that the boots didn't have much lateral flex. It was manageable, but uncomfortable. I was trying to figure out a way to shim the slider pucks to cant the boot a bit.

The TLTs have enough lateral flex that I don't feel the need to try to come up with a cant system now.

I got them for about $100 at Second Ascent in Seattle. Love that store!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Dec 13, 2005 8:17 pm 
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Joined: Thu Feb 17, 2005 2:43 pm
Posts: 36
Location: Utah
I just picked up a pair of Dynafits. Tourlite All Terrain model from about 3 seasons ago. Used them for the first time yesterday and liked them much more than the old Raichle hard snowboard boots I'd been using. I buckled them on the loosest setting so I could drive easier and not have to change boots when getting to the snow. They worked great all day long and were comfortable. I'm riding angles of about 35/18. The only time they didn't feel so good was when I got back into the resort at the end of the day and was on a nice groomer. I felt like I didn't have much support going toeside. Got to the bottom and went to loosen the boots for the drive home and realized that I had never tightened the buckles. The top 2 buckles were totally undone. I'll make sure to do those up next time and I think toeside on the hardpack will be much better. Glad I bought the boots. Used 2-4 times for $189 at Kirkhams in SLC.


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