Splitboard.com Forums

The World's first exclusive splitboard discussion forums






It is currently Thu Sep 18, 2014 4:58 am

All times are UTC - 8 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 56 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next
Author Message
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Apr 21, 2008 11:55 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Apr 03, 2007 6:43 pm
Posts: 395
Location: Seattle
Comments after looking at packs in the store.

Osprey Aether: Too lightweight for this type of application I think. The suspension is great, but I think the issue would be the straight jacket compression straps, they are just too narrow/thin to make me think they would carry a board very well, even with the pack loaded.

Osprey Exposure: Considerably more sturdy straps than the Aether for board carry/attachments, but there is still the issue of how to compress the pack when not full and carrying a board. A couple of ideas/ways around it are possible. Question for SF: On your modded Exp 66 pack, did you add compression straps to both sides of the pack, or just one side and then attach your split under the straightjacket straps that wrap to the other side of the frame to compress while carrying?

Mountainsmith: Second Ascent had the small ~2500 cubic inch women's version, the Inca I believe, that is similar in design to the Phoenix/Shavano. Without trying it on, the suspension looks like it would carry just fine, though it seems a bit over complicated. As for the pack features, a little trimming might be required to fit a split along the sides in A-frame style. The shovel pocket, tool tubes, and overall compression also appear to pretty functional, though if you wanted to carry a board vertically, then they pockets might conflict. As for compression, they seem to have gotten this right. The straps for the A-frame ski carry are both along the sides of the pack, as is typical, with half the straps attached near the pack frame. These straps are really long and have opposing buckles, so you can strech them all the way across the pack and connect male to female buckles, compressing the whole pack. So to attach a snowboard, you simply disconnect the ski straps, loosen, and attach at the center of the pack over your board, then you can compress the whole pack with the board on it.

So if I had to buy one right now, I'd probably get the Exposure, but I'm still trying to find a store where I could try on a Mountainsmith.

_________________
- Kyle

"Oh man, that's like releasing a pack of wild baboons onto a keg of Icehouse next to a tied-up and gagged Lindsay Lohan." - Luca Brasi on TGR


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Apr 21, 2008 1:17 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jul 12, 2005 5:12 pm
Posts: 1598
Location: Now Oaktowntastic
The Mountainsmith carry system sounds pretty rad. I'll have to keep an eye out for that pack to check it out.

I added compression straps to both sides of the bag. On the right side of the pack I pirated the existing female buckles that Osprey sewed close to the frame. On that side of the pack I just had to add straps with the male buckles. On the left side of the pack I added straps and my own female buckles close to the frame. I chose to do that because I wanted the board centered on the pack when I carry it.

_________________
Storn


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Apr 21, 2008 1:27 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Apr 03, 2007 6:43 pm
Posts: 395
Location: Seattle
Cool, thanks for the info SF, that's kind of what I figured you had rigged up. I just wanted to make sure before assuming. If you happen to find/look at a Mountainsmith, I'm interested to hear what you might think.

_________________
- Kyle

"Oh man, that's like releasing a pack of wild baboons onto a keg of Icehouse next to a tied-up and gagged Lindsay Lohan." - Luca Brasi on TGR


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Apr 23, 2008 10:45 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Apr 03, 2007 6:43 pm
Posts: 395
Location: Seattle
Another option: the Jansport Whittaker LR (LS, or LT):
Image

4100 - 4600 cubic inches
~ 5 lbs
Vertical snowboard carry and side compression straps.

_________________
- Kyle

"Oh man, that's like releasing a pack of wild baboons onto a keg of Icehouse next to a tied-up and gagged Lindsay Lohan." - Luca Brasi on TGR


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jun 03, 2008 10:11 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Feb 21, 2006 1:57 am
Posts: 1110
Location: Santa Barbara, CA/Ashland, OR
96avs01 wrote:
kjkrow wrote:
My point being that a heavier pack doesn't imply it will carry better than a lighter pack.


Not implying a direct correlation on my end. Simply stating that one of the easiest ways for a manufacturer to save on weight is with a thinner, less padded hip belt, a narrower, shorter, less padded shoulder strap and a lighter, less rigid internal frame. These things are of smaller importance when you a discussing carrying less than 40 pounds. However, these points become magnified when you begin to discuss carrying in excess of 50 pounds, especially over an extended trip.

Come on....be the guinea pig :lol:

Edit: Just remember that with the Exposure you have to create your own A-carry method, unless someone can verify that it will carry a split in touring mode, so you will add some weight and its utility will be based on the effectiveness of your modifications.


This thread might be kind of dead, but I wanted to confirm that I own 2 exposure packs 50l and 66l, and they both have ski carry that can accomodate a split in split mode. For longer hikes and heavier packs, I much prefer this carry method, strap the tips for aframe style and these packs handle the extra weight with ease, if the bindings hanging out on the side are a bother I just slip the pin out and strap the bindings in the straight jacket.

The biggest reason I've found to use the ski carry method is that if you are fully loaded in this pack, your shovel is on the very back of the pack and that rigid shape inhibits the ability to cinch the board into the straightjacket tight enough for my liking. I'm with the "closer to the body" camp on this issue.

FWIW I love my exposure packs, and my switch daypack! I'm a bit of an osprey whore.

_________________
"Winter is not a season, it's an occupation."
-Sinclair Lewis


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jun 03, 2008 10:21 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Apr 03, 2007 6:43 pm
Posts: 395
Location: Seattle
[quote]
The biggest reason I've found to use the ski carry method is that if you are fully loaded in this pack, your shovel is on the very back of the pack and that rigid shape inhibits the ability to cinch the board into the straightjacket tight enough for my liking. I'm with the "closer to the body" camp on this issue.
[\quote]

I'll second this, as I ended up buying the Exp 66. I've since used it the last 4 weekends and actually haven't carried my split in snowboard mode on the pack yet. But the A-framing is super easy, and super stable. I feel way more comfortable climbing with the weight closer to my back and there is really no slop when A-framed.

After much indecision prior to purchase, I'm very happy and satisfied with my choice of the Osprey.

_________________
- Kyle

"Oh man, that's like releasing a pack of wild baboons onto a keg of Icehouse next to a tied-up and gagged Lindsay Lohan." - Luca Brasi on TGR


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jun 03, 2008 10:23 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Apr 03, 2007 6:43 pm
Posts: 395
Location: Seattle
jbaysurfer wrote:
The biggest reason I've found to use the ski carry method is that if you are fully loaded in this pack, your shovel is on the very back of the pack and that rigid shape inhibits the ability to cinch the board into the straightjacket tight enough for my liking. I'm with the "closer to the body" camp on this issue.


I'll second this, as I ended up buying the Exp 66. I've since used it the last 4 weekends and actually haven't carried my split in snowboard mode on the pack yet. But the A-framing is super easy, and super stable. I feel way more comfortable climbing with the weight closer to my back and there is really no slop when A-framed.

After much indecision prior to purchase, I'm very happy and satisfied with my choice of the Osprey.

Edit: Needed some HTML work to get the quote right. Forward, not back slash. Doh!

_________________
- Kyle

"Oh man, that's like releasing a pack of wild baboons onto a keg of Icehouse next to a tied-up and gagged Lindsay Lohan." - Luca Brasi on TGR


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jun 09, 2008 6:27 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Feb 20, 2007 10:19 am
Posts: 543
Location: Capitol Hill, Denver, Colorado, U.S.A.
iceworm wrote:
[img]<a%20href="http://picasaweb.google.com/iceworm24/WindRivers2007/photo#5189724165306248722"><img%20src="http://lh5.ggpht.com/iceworm24/SAWaoctW7hI/AAAAAAAABcU/xmGOEbffeFM/s800/DSCF1949.JPG"%20/></a>[/img]


That pic just breeds cool dudeness... 8)

_________________
Riding a '06 Voile Split Decision Freeride 173, '07 Salomon Malamutes, Spark Ignition I bindings.

Check out my writings: http://www.adamlreiner.com


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: High Peak Quest 65
PostPosted: Tue Sep 02, 2008 5:42 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Apr 26, 2007 11:42 am
Posts: 529
Location: Oakland, CA
I'm bumping this to note that I am taking a chance on a pack company I've never heard of, High Peak.

I think Yoda mentioned in a thread the High Peak Quest 65:
Image

I have not seen much online about this company and its gear. It's based out of Renton, WA and the feature design seems to indicate that they have some idea what they are doing. No idea how good the warranty or customer service is. So this is going to be a complete trial for me and I'll share my results here.

Here's the basic summary:
At 5.5 pounds it's the heaviest of the ~65-70L class of packs
Dedicated snowboard carry (appears to be made of hypalon) in addition to 2 side compression straps
Side ski carry straps that look like they can A-frame a split
2 sleeve pockets that can carry shovel handle or an ice axe (one in each)
Removable top lid
comes with a rain fly
Adjustable suspension and removable hip belt
pre-bent aluminum stays

I got it from Overstock.com, where it is on sale for $80. Plus $3 shipping, minus $8 from a 10% off coupon code, means the pack cost $75. Not a bad price at all! Makes it worth the risk that it turns out to be a lemon of a pack and implodes after a few days on the hill.

BTW, overstock.com only has 3 of these packs left.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Snowboard Compatible Mountaineering Packs
PostPosted: Mon Sep 15, 2008 9:48 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Apr 03, 2007 6:43 pm
Posts: 395
Location: Seattle
Right on, let us know what you think after you get to load it up for a while. Just from looking at the pictures, it reminds me a bit of the Mountainsmith packs in terms of basic design and layout.

_________________
- Kyle

"Oh man, that's like releasing a pack of wild baboons onto a keg of Icehouse next to a tied-up and gagged Lindsay Lohan." - Luca Brasi on TGR


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Quest 65 preview
PostPosted: Mon Sep 15, 2008 10:19 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Apr 26, 2007 11:42 am
Posts: 529
Location: Oakland, CA
kjkrow wrote:
Right on, let us know what you think after you get to load it up for a while. Just from looking at the pictures, it reminds me a bit of the Mountainsmith packs in terms of basic design and layout.


I haven't loaded it up and tested the suspension at all. I'm planning on using it as a four season pack, so it will get some test on some realllllly easy overnight backpacking trips in October.

First impressions:
-pack is a bit overdesigned, probably one of the main culprits in its heavy weight (5.5 pounds):
--there are dual compression straps for top, bottom, and sides, in addition to the snowboard holding straps
--hypalon used is very thick, as the other fabrics of the shell tend to be as well - generally thicker than I have seen on other winter packs
--there is an excessive amount of hypalon for the shovel handle/ice axe holding system, there is no need to completely enclose an ice axe handle or shovel handle in a sleeve of hypalon
--there are separate ski straps (rubberized polymer with metal hooks) in *addition* to the side compression straps
--there is a separate waistbelt built into the top lid, it may be removable for weight savings or useful in first aid improvisation (I tend to carry extra straps for this purpose and others)
--there is a nylon flap that is used to securely attach the top lid if you expand the contents of the main pocket vertically ... considering there are front and back compression straps for the top lid this piece of fabric is uneccesary
--the included rainfly buckles into (it's removable) and is stored in its own special compartment at the bottom of the pack

-a positive of the overdesign is that it gives an impression of "bombproofness"

-but, the quality of the materials for the suspension system does not look like it rivals that of trusted brands such as TNF, Osprey, etc. The suspension looks decently designed (dual load stabilizers on the hip belt) and overall looks lightweight actually, but I question the foam padding and the breathable mesh covering used, we will see after I load about 40 pounds into it

-there *is* front access to the main pocket through a side zipper, this is awesome!

-there *is* a separate zippered pocket that goes behind your board/shovel that can be used to store all your avy-specific gear for quick access, this is exciting as well!

-You need at least a 30" waist, any smaller and the hip belt runs out of tensioning

-it has a grommeted port for your hydration hose, and a clip on the shoulder strap for your hose. Those clips are a pet peeve of mine because they will break the first second your beater. I removed the clip and am going to use a large key ring ... blow the water back up the hose, fold the hose below the mouthpiece, and slide the folded end into the key ring to keep in place and keep from freezing.

Pack Preview Summary:
-a super compressible, feature rich pack for a great price, but you may get what you pay for in terms of overall quality (still an untested risk)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Fri Sep 26, 2008 7:09 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Sep 06, 2007 9:45 pm
Posts: 850
Location: hopefully not at work
96avs01 wrote:
I haven't personally used the following pack, but the Mountainsmith Phoenix may be exactly what you seek. Can anyone chime in with personal experience with the Phoenix?


Decided to be my own guinea pig...picked up a Phoenix for 25% off here.

Haven't used the pack yet, but very impressed with the construction/features. Should be a great pack for 3+ day trips and winter mountaineering endeavors. Will chime in later with a proper review.

_________________
Chris

165 Venture Divide, Spark Franken-Burner, LaSportiva Spantik
163W Jones Solution, Phantom Alphas, Dynafit TLT5
162 Furberg


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Snowboard Compatible Mountaineering Packs
PostPosted: Fri Sep 26, 2008 10:03 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Wed Oct 06, 2004 10:57 pm
Posts: 4956
Location: California
Stoked you're stoked Chris but can't help but wonder why you didn't get the Osprey Exposure 66?


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 56 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next

All times are UTC - 8 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  





Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group