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PostPosted: Thu Jun 14, 2007 10:06 am 
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Joined: Tue Jul 12, 2005 5:12 pm
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Location: Now Oaktowntastic
I have a Pentax Optio WP, which the WP stands for waterproof. It's small and bomber and I like the camera. You can take underwater and surf shots with it.

But lately I've been wishing for a polarizing filter on it. Does anyone out there (Yoda) have any idea if there is a compact digital digital camera with a polarizer out there anywhere?

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 19, 2007 8:04 am 
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Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 3:44 pm
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Location: Flagstaff, AZ
Ok, and what does everyone think about their shutter speed (and by shutter speed, I mean the delay between the button and the shutter)? Mine sucks, many missed face shots and cliff drops.

Thanks guys!

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 19, 2007 8:12 am 
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Joined: Tue May 09, 2006 6:09 pm
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Location: Chamonix, France
That's not shutter speed, that's the delay between the shutter release and the shutter. Most pocket cameras are better about this nowadays, but if you really want to binge that's partly why I got mine ;-).

This also relates to autofocus speed (the motor driving the lens elements, as well as the unit figuring out the focus). One way to get around this is to use a longer exposure (e.g. 1/60 or 1/100) and a small aperture (f/8-16 or so), to increase the depth of field, and then twiddle the camera settings to prioritise exposure to autofocus (e.g. take the shot even if it might be out of focus). Chances are with that aperture it'll still look sharp.

These are difficult questions to ask a sales rep, but see if you can ask about that if you're concerned about action shots.

Typically a continuous mode will work roughly the same (prioritising taking the shot over autofocusing), so try just switching the camera to continuous mode before an action sequence, even if it's just for one exposure.


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 19, 2007 10:24 am 
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Joined: Fri Nov 19, 2004 8:41 pm
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Location: Santa Cruz, CA
Yeah, what he said. Whenever I'm taking action shots I try to "prepare" the camera... with point & shoot cameras this is typically this is done by aiming at something near where the shot will occur, and pushing the shutter button halfway down. This will cause it to calculate the exposure and focus. You can then see if the exposure is going to be off and manually correct it first. Anyway, once the camera is prepared for the shot this way, then you just sit there with the button halfway down, and as you're moving around as the subject comes into view the camera isn't going crazy trying to recalculate things... when you're ready for the shot just press the shutter button the rest of the way, and it should take the shot pretty much instantly.

Same thing for continuous mode - prep the camera first so that the exposure and focus are right for the first shot; it should use the same settings for all shots while the shutter is engaged.

As far as camera recommendations, I've been using the Canon SD cameras for a while now, and I love them. Currently using an SD600. Great shots, and extremely portable. It's got a nice big screen, and it's tiny - you can put it just about anywhere and always have easy access to it. Lately I've been using one of the color presets called "vivid color" which seems to work well for outdoor photos, but even on the normal auto settings it takes great pics. It does have pretty decent manual control as well. For pics with lots of snow, sometimes the exposure can get screwed up, so you can either set it manually, or focus on a different area with less snow (like the sky), push the shutter button halfway to lock in the exposure, and repoint at the original target.

The only downsides I've found:

- The screen can get scratched pretty easily. You can get protective covers, but those tend to reflect a lot more light making it difficult to use in the sun. The screen is also pretty fragile, it's easy to crack it or otherwise mess it up if you hit it on something (this is true of all LCD's though). A good case is a good idea.

- It's not waterproof. I've dropped it in the snow a few times, and it still works fine. You can get a waterproof overcase for it, but that is mainly intended for underwater shooting. It adds a lot to the size so you probably wouldn't want to use it in the bc.

I also finally rigged up something to keep from losing it in the snow. You know those ski ticket holders with the retractable cord that you tie to the ticket? I attached one of those to the pack hip belt, and tied in the camera wrist strap to the end of the retractable cord. That way, you can still lift the camera wherever you need to because of the retractable cord, but if you drop it, it won't go tumbling down to the bottom of the hill. For the camera itself I put it in this iPod case which I can put on the hip belt of my pack. That way it's always accessible. I'll see if I can take a pic of the setup.

Oh yeah, buy a couple extra batteries on ebay. Way cheaper than the retail replacement batteries, and the battery will inevitably die right when you're about to get the perfect shot. That little iPod case has an extra pocket in it which I use for an extra battery and SD card.


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 19, 2007 11:30 am 
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Joined: Wed Nov 17, 2004 11:42 am
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Location: California
I wish I had the patience to learn how to use the camera I do own and to actually stop and take photos...especially on the decent. :cry: :cry:


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 04, 2007 8:11 pm 
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Joined: Fri Nov 19, 2004 8:41 pm
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Location: Santa Cruz, CA
jimw wrote:
I also finally rigged up something to keep from losing it in the snow. You know those ski ticket holders with the retractable cord that you tie to the ticket? I attached one of those to the pack hip belt, and tied in the camera wrist strap to the end of the retractable cord. That way, you can still lift the camera wherever you need to because of the retractable cord, but if you drop it, it won't go tumbling down to the bottom of the hill. For the camera itself I put it in this iPod case which I can put on the hip belt of my pack. That way it's always accessible. I'll see if I can take a pic of the setup.

Here's a pic of that contraption (kinda tricky to take with the camera attached to it! :)):

Image


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