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PostPosted: Mon Jan 30, 2006 8:23 pm 
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Joined: Mon Nov 22, 2004 4:18 pm
Posts: 323
Location: NW/BC/Montana
My solution to keeping up with skiers: Go on long enough tours so that the transitions are used as a breather as well as a switching period. When you're really tired, you want the transition to take more time, not less :)

If you keep the skins on for the steeper skiing sections (within reason), you will be slower but the speeds and turns can be a lot more manageable.


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 30, 2006 10:00 pm 
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Joined: Sun Apr 10, 2005 2:26 pm
Posts: 74
Ive had simmilliar issues and found skiing the splitboard in split mode really isnt that hard. I dont Tele turn I just lean back on the heals so they stay put and ski from the bask seet. I think the fact that Im a far better skier then snowboarder helps. Ive also found that using your poles while riding works well. Carrying poles while riding most of the time doesnt bother me, once again skier thing, I would recomend shortening them up quite a bit from your touring length so as not to get them stuck. I have considered trading my split for randonee gear, in that I could ride more on skis then I could on the snowboard, but the float and surf you get from a board in the deep backcountry pow is just unbeatable in my oppinion. Plus you get lots of funny looks in the parking lots :P.
-Barret


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 30, 2006 11:52 pm 
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Joined: Thu Aug 18, 2005 9:32 pm
Posts: 17
Location: Davis, CA
Nothing beats floating on a board in powder- this is for sure.. I just can't stand the smaller terrain features that stop me dead in my tracks.. like the short 50 yards or so of flat on a ridge line or in the trees. Skis are just superior when it comes to that.

For some reason I have convinced myself that being mobile on skis (i.e., having both of your feet functioning independently of each other) is far superior and safer than having your feet stuck to one board. If I was out on some line that failed and a buddy got buried, I'd much rather have the mobility of skis than a board...

I used to go out in the bc of colorado and practice beacon recoveries with my skier buddies (I was on my board).. and it sucked to have to take my board off and post-hole around until I found a buried beacon. Now I know avalanche debris is hard but.. hmm.. think I would opt for the skis..

Thanks for all your input.. I guess voile/burton/prior should come up with a board that you can switch back and forth from touring to board and back without getting out of the bindings.. that would be truly amazing!! that way small terrain features would just require a click and shift to get past!! some day..

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 31, 2006 9:12 am 
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Joined: Wed Feb 16, 2005 2:53 pm
Posts: 30
Location: Colorado
I ski my splitboard about as much as I ride it even though I've got two pair of tele skis sitting at home. People ask me why I don't just bring tele gear instead and the response is always "because I like to make the decision to board or ski at the top of the hill, not at home." You never know what the snow will be like until you're there so why decide at home?

It only makes sense that a splitboard would make great powder skis...They got more surface area than any skis I've seen so they float great in the powder. They turn great (assuming you put the curved side on the inside) and make short radius turns easy. The straight side of the splitboard isn't a hinderence either because (as any skier will tell you) that edge doesn't have any weight on it. I think using hard boots makes it easier to ski.

Yeah, you can't really make tele turns with it (pivot point is all wrong under the foot and you can't pressure the ski with the ball of your foot), but it reminds me of alpining it on teles. Along those same lines, you got to be on the 'sweet spot' fore/aft so that you don't eat the tips. I haven't done any damage taking spills yet...but having a lot of teleing under my belt probably helps with falling 'softly'.

Image

Still need to work on style points :)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 31, 2006 10:19 am 
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Joined: Thu Aug 18, 2005 9:32 pm
Posts: 17
Location: Davis, CA
Nice picture!!! Do the bindings on the split skis stand up to such abuse? I might need to try making turns on the split skis before I make my final say. It appears that splitboards might be the best of both worlds.. (I can board the steeps and ski the bumpy unevenness).

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 31, 2006 10:21 am 
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Joined: Thu Aug 18, 2005 9:32 pm
Posts: 17
Location: Davis, CA
btw- what type of bindings do you use in that picture? strap ins? mtn plate? tele plate?

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 31, 2006 11:05 am 
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Joined: Wed Feb 16, 2005 2:53 pm
Posts: 30
Location: Colorado
No damage to the touring brackets but you have to occasionally take out the slop at the pivot point by bending the sides of the touring bracket to hold the plate tighter.

I ride on mtn plates with snowboard hard boots.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 31, 2006 2:50 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2005 7:25 pm
Posts: 69
Location: idaho
plark,
keep trying the split it sounds like a technique flaw more than an equipement issue. even with the avalanche analogy, i don't see it. the transition time is the flaw, but try riding in split mode. i think last year someone posted a picture of taking air in split mode, and it looked great.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 31, 2006 4:11 pm 
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Joined: Tue Dec 14, 2004 3:10 pm
Posts: 54
I'm a big fan of keeping my poles ready at all times. When it flattens out I start poling before I loose to much speed. Big baskets help a lot.

Rout planning is a given, and tell your skier friends not to friggin stop on flat stretches. Instead they need to stop at the end of the flats at the top of the next roll. God I hate that :evil:

Lastly you gota know when to hold em and when to fold em. A quick decision to split will save a lot of hassle and consumes way less energy. I never timed myself but I hazard to think I can make the transition in 30 seconds without skins. The skins seem to take the most time and the skiers have to deal with that anyway.

I found that skiing on moderate terrain is not only fairly easy but kind of fun. Its not bad with a little practice.

I proud to say that I rarely ever have people waiting on me 8)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Feb 01, 2006 9:56 am 
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Joined: Thu Aug 18, 2005 9:32 pm
Posts: 17
Location: Davis, CA
I will try that.. just need to rent a splitboard from thebc.net and make sure before I make a purchase..

thanks

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Feb 09, 2006 6:52 pm 
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Joined: Wed Nov 30, 2005 3:32 pm
Posts: 362
has any one ever seen a guy named Dee ski the voile 190 swallow with rental quality k2 boots? He skis as well as any tele skier I've ever seen in the last 17 years. Impressive! Eventually you will stretch/grind out the holes on your touring plates.


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 Post subject: Split Skiing
PostPosted: Thu Feb 09, 2006 7:48 pm 
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Joined: Fri Dec 23, 2005 8:29 pm
Posts: 208
Location: Bermuda Triangle
I know "D"-rail, and in the Wasatch here, split skiing is very common. Many snowboarders get splits thinking they're gonna get out and smoke people, only to find themselves floundering in split mode. It's a definite skill that takes time to learn, and just keep in mind that 80 percent of the time in the bc, you're actually split. Snowboarders with skiing backgrounds learn very fast. A balanced/skilled splitboarder is comfortable in split mode in most all terrain that they snowboard.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Feb 10, 2006 12:46 pm 
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Joined: Sat Jan 28, 2006 9:16 am
Posts: 31
Location: Salt Lake
Yeah split skiing is crucial. Im learning that more and more.

I'm like bigboater, I keep my poles out sometimes even though it makes you look kind of dorky like those skiers. (JK, I love skiers. Actually I love dorks.) If you're on your last lap or know your going to hit flats at the end of your line it can save you a lot of torture if you keep your momentum up with some hard poleing.


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