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 Post subject: Hut trip advice.
PostPosted: Fri Mar 23, 2012 9:49 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jan 24, 2011 6:55 pm
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Location: Squaw Valley
So I am planning on going on a short overnight hut trip in about a week. I was just wondering if anyone here had any advice that might not be obvious. I have been on a hut trip before, a little winter camping, and plenty of spring car camping snowboard trips. Any tips from food, to gear, to comfort, would be appreciated. (I am guessing someone is going to say bacon).


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 Post subject: Re: Hut trip advice.
PostPosted: Sat Mar 24, 2012 6:03 am 
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Joined: Sun Aug 01, 2010 5:18 am
Posts: 305
Not really hut trip advice but these guys built sweet diy tobogans to haul gear into the bc.



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 Post subject: Re: Hut trip advice.
PostPosted: Sun Mar 25, 2012 5:26 am 
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Joined: Tue Jan 04, 2011 5:53 am
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Location: Routt County Co.
It's all about the amount of beer you can sneak into your fellow hutters packs. :D


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 Post subject: Re: Hut trip advice.
PostPosted: Sun Mar 25, 2012 1:10 pm 
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Joined: Wed Dec 14, 2005 11:09 pm
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Location: white room
Do as much food prep as possible before hand. And bring tp.

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 Post subject: Re: Hut trip advice.
PostPosted: Sun Mar 25, 2012 2:30 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 22, 2010 10:17 pm
Posts: 297
Location: South Lake Tahoe, CA
Good advice above. Some years, I have lugged in large quantities of beer and food, and convinced myself that the sacrifice was worth it. There is nothing like a cold beer at the end of a day or touring. Sometimes I pack light with dehydrated food and vodka/whiskey, and I really enjoy my approach to the hut. I guess it depends on the difficulty of your approach route and how much you are willing to endure. On cat track approaches, I load up the pack with the good stuff. On more technical approaches, I prefer to go light.

I have used the sled/1" pvc pipe/parachute cord set-up like shown in the video above. On cat tracks, it works really well---and we have successfully hauled multiple cases of beer along with our gear. Good times!! On off camber/technical approaches, I consider them a no-go.

Extra toilet paper is a must. Many folks would put bacon in the same category. I tend to limit the cloths that I bring my touring stuff, a change in base layers/gloves, and a light puffy. I used to use a 30 degree down bag to save weight and space---but I have been more comfortable when bringing my zero degree down bag.

Enjoy yourselves---hut trips can be great fun!


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 Post subject: Re: Hut trip advice.
PostPosted: Mon Mar 26, 2012 11:49 am 
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Joined: Mon Jan 24, 2011 6:55 pm
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Location: Squaw Valley
Thanks for the ideas so far. We have two options for approaches.
Plan A. Start in the next drainage south that has a ski resort parking lot, and skin up 2000 or so feet (normally takes me just under two hours) and drop down about 1200 feet to the hut.
Plan B. Take the or so five plus mile forest service road straight up the drainage to get to the hut.
Sleds won't be an option if we take plan A. I think we can manage grossly overloaded packs for the first skin, and ride though.


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 Post subject: Re: Hut trip advice.
PostPosted: Mon Mar 26, 2012 1:05 pm 
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Location: South Lake Tahoe
I always make homemade pizza and load it with toppings before I leave. Then wrap it in foil for each meal. Then you can just heat each one up on the woodstove. proper

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 Post subject: Re: Hut trip advice.
PostPosted: Mon Mar 26, 2012 2:10 pm 
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Joined: Wed Oct 28, 2009 10:03 am
Posts: 312
Ear plugs. Hut booties. Book. Courvoisier. Drum machine. Bar of chocolate. One can of beer.


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 Post subject: Re: Hut trip advice.
PostPosted: Tue Mar 27, 2012 1:57 am 
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JimmyC wrote:

I have used the sled/1" pvc pipe/parachute cord set-up like shown in the video above. On cat tracks, it works really well---and we have successfully hauled multiple cases of beer along with our gear. Good times!! On off camber/technical approaches, I consider them a no-go.

Enjoy yourselves---hut trips can be great fun!


what about if your last on the skin track? will it still not sit in behind?


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 Post subject: Re: Hut trip advice.
PostPosted: Tue Mar 27, 2012 6:28 am 
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Location: Denver
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 Post subject: Re: Hut trip advice.
PostPosted: Tue Mar 27, 2012 7:40 am 
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Location: Durango, CO
I did 6 nights in huts in BC last month, 5 nights in Keiths and 1 in an unnamed. Takes normally 2hrs to hike in to Keiths, constant rolling ice track. What we decided to do was pack in everything on a 70L pack and no sled. We weighed them at about 50lbs. I've done the sled route on other time (no mods, simple sled), and the sled would have sucked on that approach. My thought is that 2hrs isn't long and just slog it out with the pack. We did it after a day of riding as well, and although tired, it wasn't horrible.

Although beer is sweet, whiskey tastes pretty good still and is 1/10th the weight, so your drunk to weight ratio is much better. If you want to get a buzz, this is the way to go IMO. But having a stash of beer in the car at the end is a must! Also :doobie: it up while in the hut.

We did as much of the backpackers meals as possible. They make it easier, but are more expensive. We were ok with that for the ease (and we were going to another country, easier to fly with). Other people made meals, and I just thought it was a huge pain in the ass, I was just there to ride 8-9 hours, and food should be easy as hell. Also, we got a bunch of food off people during the week (keiths has a revolving 12+ people in it). One night we didn't cook any dinner, and a few lunchs we just got from people who didn't want to hike out. Certainly don't plan for that, but if I was to do Keiths again, I'd pack for 1 less day possibly.

Also, we hiked in a pair of pajama pants, and I must say, they were sweet to have at nights. It sucks sitting around in your ski pants at the end of the day, and switching to those is awesome. People were quite jealous it seemed.

In terms of booties / slippers, get something that can handle a little bit of snow travel. Rubber bottoms are best. No felt bottoms unless you like to constantly scrape off snow every time you go out. And getting them wet pretty much sucks ass for the night.

We also at first hiked in with day packs, and then transferred. It wasn't worth it so, we decided that 70L pack was fine to ride in if it synches down enough to ride. I could go either way there, depends on your pack and length of stay. I'd say for my pack (Osprey Aether 70L), for up to 5 days, I could do the large pack, and over, I may be pumped on a second pack for the weight savings and ease to ride.

And as mentioned, extra TP, and a few sets of earplugs.

Have fun, hope that helps!


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 Post subject: Re: Hut trip advice.
PostPosted: Tue Mar 27, 2012 7:42 am 
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Joined: Tue Jan 04, 2011 9:03 pm
Posts: 221
Location: British Columbia
singlewhitecaveman wrote:
Ear plugs.


Ear plugs :thumbsup:


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 Post subject: Re: Hut trip advice.
PostPosted: Tue Mar 27, 2012 12:15 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 22, 2010 10:17 pm
Posts: 297
Location: South Lake Tahoe, CA
That canned whiskey is a great find---thanks!!!

ChrisNZ, I think the sled would probably stay in the skin tack fairly well on traverses of moderate slopes---and I bet a skilled operator with a well packed sled and a good skin track could probably do pretty well on more technical terrain. I am pretty sure that I would end up in a pile of beer cans and food at the bottom of a slope if I tried anything too tricky with a heavy sled.


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