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 Post subject: Re: Compass/Inclinometer
PostPosted: Fri Dec 16, 2011 1:32 pm 
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Joined: Mon Nov 22, 2004 3:00 pm
Posts: 293
Location: Northern CA
I just ordered this one... http://www.thecompassstore.com/lumotec.html

Pros: German made and the smallest one with a mirror, clinometer & adj. declination. :thumpsup:

Cons: Not cheap. :(

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 Post subject: Re: Compass/Inclinometer
PostPosted: Fri Dec 16, 2011 3:08 pm 
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Joined: Thu Feb 24, 2011 1:03 pm
Posts: 344
Location: Stockton, CA
Yoda that looks nice. Let us know what you think when you get it, I'd like to check it out. Did you also buy the case?


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 Post subject: Re: Compass/Inclinometer
PostPosted: Sun Dec 18, 2011 11:20 pm 
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Joined: Sat May 28, 2011 9:38 pm
Posts: 23
Location: Salt Lake City, UT
Thanks everyone for the comments. I ended up going with this one. http://www.rei.com/product/737543/brunt ... cl-compass It has been really nice so far, it has a declination adjustment option, although I need to figure out how that works exactly. I believe Utah/Wasatch is around 14 degrees or so? Maybe some advice on that would be super helpful.

As for the inclinometer, it is pretty damn helpful. It is best with the ski pole readings but is also good to use for measuring alpha angles from the bottom of a face. I am nervous using a beacon or something similar as a compass in case of the freak chance that you get blasted with an avalanche while it's not strapped to you so I wanted something for old fashioned and reliable.


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 Post subject: Re: Compass/Inclinometer
PostPosted: Mon Dec 19, 2011 7:00 pm 
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Joined: Mon Dec 22, 2008 6:35 pm
Posts: 316
Location: Ithaca, NY
Same compass I own. I picked it for all the reasons stated. Declination adjustment most importantly, sighting mirror (I do use it), and Inclinometer (I don't often). Very nice compass. Enjoy!

Also to get declination information I use the following website. http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/geomagmodels/Declination.jsp Our tax dollars at work! (I hope at least.)


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 Post subject: Re: Compass/Inclinometer
PostPosted: Mon Dec 19, 2011 9:21 pm 
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Joined: Mon Nov 22, 2004 3:00 pm
Posts: 293
Location: Northern CA
Yoda wrote:
I just ordered this one... http://www.thecompassstore.com/lumotec.html

Pros: German made and the smallest one with a mirror, clinometer & adj. declination. :thumpsup:

Cons: Not cheap. :(

I found one that's even smaller & lighter with ALL of the key features... http://www.thecompassstore.com/mb6.html

Pros: Made in Finland. Cheaper price @ $50

Brunton also makes the 8040G that has ALL of the key features. It's not much smaller than their 15TDCL, but it's only 1.6oz @ $44. The only bummer is the clinometer only goes up to 35 degrees.

Good choice JRoh for getting the Brunton compass. That one works really well and is made by Silva in Sweden. :thumpsup:

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 Post subject: Re: Compass/Inclinometer
PostPosted: Mon Dec 26, 2011 3:49 pm 
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Joined: Mon Nov 22, 2004 3:00 pm
Posts: 293
Location: Northern CA
Yoda wrote:
I found one that's even smaller & lighter with ALL of the key features... http://www.thecompassstore.com/mb6.html

I received a cool XMas gift... I got an older swiss-made Recta DP-10 compass that's the original design of the Suunto MB-6. Note: Suunto owns Recta.

This is the first time I've played with this uniquely designed compass. I have to say it's quite innovative. The one I got even has a prismatic viewing option for super precise sighting & surveying. This compass design is still currently used by the Swiss military and several others including some US forces.

The only thing it's missing are some basic map tools (i.e. magnifier & ruler options), but it's still a very efficient compass.

I should receive the K&R german compass this week and will post some reviews. I also have a Suunto MC-2 that I can compare it against.

I have to admit I'm kind of a compass geek. Check out this online museum if you like compasses... http://www.compassmuseum.com/
Look out for my very rare Triumph marching compass featured on this site.

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 Post subject: Re: Compass/Inclinometer
PostPosted: Sun Jan 01, 2012 7:38 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 16, 2010 11:41 am
Posts: 289
Location: Altadena SoCal
Last month, I bought Brunton's 26DNL-CL based off this thread and have not been too impressed. Two problems: one small and one huge.
1) The clinometer needs to be cajoled into vertical (i.e. with more cajoling than what feels accurate). On northerly aspects the compass needle tends to go near vertical (aligning with the magnetosphere) and this gets in the way of the clinometer. I suppose this could be mitigated by moving something metal near the compass when taking a slope reading. It would be nice to have compass needle and clinometer indicator rotate in separate tracks on the pin.
2) The worst feature of this compass is the hinge design which attaches the sighting mirror to the baseplate. The baseplate and the top are one piece of molded plastic with two folded slivers of plastic functioning as a 'hinge.' The problem is a lack of torsional rigidity between the top and the baseplate.
(*I know this sounds like nit-picky minutiae but hear me out*).
To take the bearing of a feature (like a distant peak), you adjust the compass-housing & mirror with one hand and while holding the baseplate with the other; keeping the mirror steady with the thumb. Minimal torsional rigidity means the mirror rotates through more than one axis in relation to the baseplate. I.e. The v-sight & centerline of the mirror are not true with the direction of travel arrow on the baseplate & index pointer on the compass housing (because you keep the angle of the mirror steady with slight pressure from your thumb, thereby torquing lid slightly). When you use the mirror to take a bearing (aligning your eye with the index pointer through the centerline of the mirror), you end up rotating the whole compass to compensate so the peak is aligned with how the lines appear in the mirror; yielding a false reading when you use the v-sight, or the mirror as a guide when you rotate the compass housing.

Bottom line: Brunton's 26DNL-CL is inaccurate as a sight compass while awkward and lacking in standard features as a baseplate compass.

FWIW the lack of adjustable declination makes life unnecessarily difficult too.

If you need a sighting compass, spend the extra $$ & a few ounces more to get a compass with all the features Strain listed and a decent hinge like the Brunton 15TDCL.
Otherwise save your money and weight and get a nice baseplate compass like Silva's Explorer pro.


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 Post subject: Re: Compass/Inclinometer
PostPosted: Mon Jan 02, 2012 11:12 pm 
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Joined: Mon Nov 22, 2004 3:00 pm
Posts: 293
Location: Northern CA
I've recently compared several compass brands available in the US that ALL have adjustable declination, a sighting mirror & a 0-90 degree clinometer. Here's the list...

Brunton - Eclipse/Eclipse Pro
Brunton - 15TDCL
K&R - Alpin
K&R - Lumo Tec
K&R - Sherpa BW2
Silva USA - Ranger CL
Suunto - MB-6
Suunto - MC-2

Out of all of these, my overall favorite is K&R's Lumo Tec for its size, weight, quality, simplicity & features. Second runner up is Suunto's MB-6.

My other personal favorite is the MC-2. The reason for my bias is Suunto is the only compass manufacturer that offers a "Global" needle version that allows their compasses to work in both N & S hemispheres. It costs a bit more, but you'll only need to buy one compass if you travel worldwide. Suunto also offers the MB-6 with the "Global" needle... that's why I gave it 2nd in my pick. Note: Both of these compasses are available without the 'Global" needle.

I have Brunton's 26DNL-CL compass and I have to agree with Han's review above. I've carried & used this compass merely because it was lighter & more compact and I felt it was sufficient for my needs. However thinking more about it... If I'm in need of a compass, I don't want a toy, I want a tool. Plus the clinometer only goes up to 60 degrees on this compass. The Lumo Tec is nearly the same size as this Brunton model, but it comes with ALL of the "key" features & a way better hinge design.:thumpsup:

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 Post subject: Re: Compass/Inclinometer
PostPosted: Fri Jan 06, 2012 11:27 am 
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Joined: Tue Nov 16, 2010 11:41 am
Posts: 289
Location: Altadena SoCal
Yoda wrote:
My other personal favorite is the MC-2. The reason for my bias is Suunto is the only compass manufacturer that offers a "Global" needle version that allows their compasses to work in both N & S hemispheres.

The model with the global needle is the MC-2G (+ the G for 'global' and $30 more). The MC-2 has all the key features w/out the fancy needle. FWIW the MC-2's needle is balanced for the entire northern hemisphere (which is more than most other compass needles).

The global needle does a little bit more than work in both hemispheres (which doesn't matter to 99% of compass users). Essentially, it's a pocket sized marine compass (i.e. a magnet on a gimbal), which significantly decreases dampening time and allows the needle to point north even when the compass is not level. That means you can take bearings directly at features above or below you (up to 20°) and (most importantly) the needle stays true while in motion; which might matter to those of us who don't commute across the equator.


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 Post subject: Re: Compass/Inclinometer
PostPosted: Thu Jan 19, 2012 11:06 am 
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Joined: Thu Nov 04, 2010 10:13 pm
Posts: 204
Wow Yoda!

I also use the MC-2 and am happy with it so far - but I don't really do much challenging navigation, and I also often carry a GPS so that I can have waypoints and tracks.

The MC-2 has saved me from getting lost a couple of times in unfamiliar terrain when I didn't have a GPS.

Cheers
Ivo


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 Post subject: Re: Compass/Inclinometer
PostPosted: Wed Feb 01, 2012 2:05 pm 
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Joined: Mon Nov 22, 2004 3:00 pm
Posts: 293
Location: Northern CA
Silva Sweden was sold last year, so as a result, Silva Sweden & Brunton USA have parted ways.

Check out Brunton's new USA made compasses that have a sighting mirror, adj. declination and a 0-90 degree clinometer... http://store.bruntonoutdoor.com/navigat ... .s.s.-50m/

Here's their full-featured version... http://store.bruntonoutdoor.com/navigat ... .s.s.-60m/

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