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 Post subject: Top Tips for DIY Splits
PostPosted: Fri Oct 15, 2010 12:14 am 
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Joined: Thu Oct 14, 2010 3:47 am
Posts: 5
First of all, I'd just like to thank everyone here for all the useful pictures, tips and information. I had a great time going through pages of threads here before finally committing to making a DIY split. It turned out really well, better than I'd expected for a first shot.

I think it would be great if we could get all the best tips for making a DIY splitboard into one thread. These are some of the tips that I found most helpful from reading on here, and some of things that I discovered while making my split. I should have taken photos during the split process to illustrate some of these ideas. Feel free to contribute your ideas and pictures too, I'll try to keep the first post up to date with everyone's points.

Tips

  • Wax your base before you begin and don't scrape. This will let you easily remove any dirt or glue residue from the splitting process.

  • File or hacksaw through the edge at the tip and tail before you split the board to prevent the edge ripping off when you make the split. Make sure you make this filing as wide as the saw kerf (cut width) will be. Or cut a small wedge shape and meet the point with your saw cut.

  • Clamp a 2x4 to the base of your board to act as a saw guide if you plan to use a circular saw. You'll need to have drawn the center line on the board then allow for the offset of the saw guide.

  • Be prepared to do the split all in one cut. If you stop, the saw might make a wider cut where you restart. I made this mistake on one section of the board so doesn't look perfect.

  • Set the depth of the circular saw fairly shallow, doing this prevents from the saw from ripping up the tip/tail when cutting the board upside down. -maniacdave

  • Apply your template stickers AFTER splitting your board. This might seem obvious, but the saw will remove a certain amount of board material from the middle, so doing it before you cut is asking for a sloppy connection. Make sure the board halves are together tightly when you put the templates on.

  • Double check your hole patterns before you drill with actual hardware. My Voile kit had the touring bracket bolt pattern slightly off WTF!. (Good thing I found this out on a test board. I did however brake rule #1 of any job: measure twice, cut once. Or was it measure once, cut twice :scratch:) -keffler

  • Use the Voile universal baseplates and your existing inserts to hold the board halves tightly together while marking out and installing the Chinese hooks and tip and tail hooks. This will ensure there is no wiggle or slop between the halves of the board when you put them together. -SkateBananas

  • You might be able to align your templates to allow you to use one of the factory inserts with your pucks. Just use the appropriate M6 screw. Drilling close to inserts isn't the best idea, as you will hit the metal insert. If you need to put a t-nut close to an insert and the metal is getting in the way, you can snap off one of the points on the t-nut before inserting it.

  • Use a center punch for marking the holes from any templates you use.

  • Drill a guide hole through these punch marks on top of the board with a thin drill bit. Use this guide hole to drill your t-nut countsink holes in the base with a wood boring bit, then drill out the center of these holes from the top with the appropriate sized bit for the bolt going into it.

  • Get a ball pein hammer for flaring the tip/tail hook rivets in the Voile kit. It is much easier than trying to use the Voile pin to do the job.

  • Toko base repair powder can be used for filling t-nut holes easily and durably if done properly. It is available in black or clear, and looks pretty good with a black base. I used epoxy under and over the t-nut and let this partially cure (overnight) before putting the powder in. Done properly these hold up to the pulling power of brand new skin glue.

  • Base patched t-nuts: get a metal pipe with Inside diameter equal to your drill bit size used to drill the base for the t-nuts, and punch out patches from base material. Your local ski manufacturer should have plenty of off cuts of base material for this. Then epoxy and clamp over night. Also helps if you slightly sharpen the metal tube and punch out patches using a vice first and/or a hammer. -ChrisNZ

Tools and materials you might need:

- Circular saw / table saw / water jet cutter: To cut your board in half!
- 2x4: minimum length 6ft. To act as a saw guide if using a circular saw.
- Clamps
- T-nuts: (if you are not planning to use the Voile wood screws). I used 1/4" x 5/16" Barrel.
- Hacksaw/file for cutting through edges
- Center Punch
- Bolts: for the T-nuts. I used 1/4" x 18mm.
- 3/4" woodboring bit: for recessing the tnuts
- Epoxy: for sealing Tnuts, possibly for edge sealing too.
- Wooden paddle sticks: for mixing your epoxy so you don't gunk up a screwdriver
- Countersink bit: for the Chinese Hooks
- Masking tape: for preventing chips along the center line
- Sandpaper: of a couple of different grits
- Sidewall sealant: (spar urethane, epoxy).
- Ball pein hammer
- Regular hammer or rubber mallet: for pounding in t-nuts. I used a socket of the same size as the t-nut to hammer them in evenly.
- Waxing iron, wax
- Metal scraper: for removing excess epoxy, ptex or base repair powder
- Base repair powder For covering the base of the epoxied tnuts.
- Base cleaner
- Beer: for clarity and stamina


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 Post subject: Re: Top Tips for DIY Splits
PostPosted: Fri Oct 15, 2010 10:56 am 
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Joined: Sat Aug 21, 2010 9:06 pm
Posts: 206
Location: Udapimp, Idaho
Great tips mushroom :thumpsup:
I like the idea of consolidating advice into a single thread; could be worth a sticky in the long run.
I'm about to do my 1st DIY split for this season and have spent a lot time on here digging through old threads for the needle in a haystack that'll make the job more successful.
Details on cut sidewall treatments is my biggest concern :scratch: I'm leaning toward getting a ptex repair gun and removing a small channel of core material to create a ptex sidewall or go cheap and do the same with epoxy.

My other concern is limiting the amount of tnuts/ptex patches by using ski mounting screws in non-critical spots like heel risers, 3rd ski bracket hole, 2nd s-clip hole, as well as using existing factory inserts to use only 1 tnut per puck.
I've mounted a few tele, alpine and pre-insert snowboard bindings over the years and believe a carefully set and epoxied wide-thread mount screw is viable in all but the most high stress locations.

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 Post subject: Re: Top Tips for DIY Splits
PostPosted: Fri Oct 15, 2010 9:29 pm 
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Joined: Thu Oct 14, 2010 3:47 am
Posts: 5
Regarding the edge sealing- I just used several coats of from a spray can of spar urethane, letting it dry and sanding it lightly in between. This has held up fine for a few tours in abrasive Australian snow. Ptex sidewalls might be overkill unless you are going to inlay an edge as well.


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 Post subject: Re: Top Tips for DIY Splits
PostPosted: Sat Oct 16, 2010 11:36 pm 
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Joined: Sun Aug 01, 2010 5:18 am
Posts: 305
base patched tnuts- Get a metal pipe with Inside diameter equal to your drillbit size used to drill the base for the tnuts, and punch out patches from base material. Your local ski manufacture should have plenty of off cuts of base material for this. Then epoxy and clamp over night.

also helps if you slightly sharpen the metal tube and punch out patches using a vice first and/or a hammer.


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 Post subject: Re: Top Tips for DIY Splits
PostPosted: Sun Oct 17, 2010 12:21 am 
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Joined: Sat Apr 04, 2009 10:32 am
Posts: 568
Location: Dethbridge, AB
^^^ I like that one Chris.

For cutting the board my method went something like this:

-masking tape down the centre line of the of the top sheet to prevent any chipping
-set the depth of the circular saw fairly shallow, doing this prevents from the saw from ripping up the tip/tail when cutting the board upside down!
-then cut the last inch or so of the tip/tail with a hacksaw


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 Post subject: Re: Top Tips for DIY Splits
PostPosted: Sun Oct 17, 2010 11:05 am 
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Joined: Fri Feb 20, 2009 10:24 am
Posts: 148
Location: San Juans Colorado
I used a universal base plate and the existing inserts to hold the two halves together when putting the chinese hooks and tip/tail clips on. The two halves were held very tightly together and exactly where i wanted them. The end result was a very tightly fitting board with no wobble/wiggle.


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 Post subject: Re: Top Tips for DIY Splits
PostPosted: Sun Oct 17, 2010 12:52 pm 
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Joined: Sat Apr 04, 2009 10:32 am
Posts: 568
Location: Dethbridge, AB
^^^ I'd forgotten about that one. It does make for a super tight fit between the board halves, and it prevents the halves from popping up when clamped together super tight.


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 Post subject: Re: Top Tips for DIY Splits
PostPosted: Tue Oct 19, 2010 8:10 am 
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Joined: Tue Jul 13, 2010 2:09 pm
Posts: 330
Location: Colorado
  • Double check your hole patterns before you drill with actual hardware. My Voile kit had the touring bracket bolt pattern slightly off WTF!. (Good thing I found this out on a test board. I did however brake rule #1 of any job: measure twice, cut once. Or was it measure once, cut twice :scratch:)


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 Post subject: Re: Top Tips for DIY Splits
PostPosted: Tue Oct 19, 2010 8:17 am 
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Joined: Tue Jul 13, 2010 2:09 pm
Posts: 330
Location: Colorado
b0ardski wrote:
Great tips mushroom :thumpsup:
I like the idea of consolidating advice into a single thread; could be worth a sticky in the long run.
I'm about to do my 1st DIY split for this season and have spent a lot time on here digging through old threads for the needle in a haystack that'll make the job more successful.
Details on cut sidewall treatments is my biggest concern :scratch: I'm leaning toward getting a ptex repair gun and removing a small channel of core material to create a ptex sidewall or go cheap and do the same with epoxy.

My other concern is limiting the amount of tnuts/ptex patches by using ski mounting screws in non-critical spots like heel risers, 3rd ski bracket hole, 2nd s-clip hole, as well as using existing factory inserts to use only 1 tnut per puck.
I've mounted a few tele, alpine and pre-insert snowboard bindings over the years and believe a carefully set and epoxied wide-thread mount screw is viable in all but the most high stress locations.


I tested out using G-Flex 650 epoxy for the cut sidewall treatment. Looks really good. I added just a small amount of Acrylic paint to make it match the board. Get a good file to "sand" flat and true to the other half. So far this looks like it is going to be a really strong surface. I'll post some picture when I get a chance. P-tex just seems like too much of a pain and it seems like it is hard to get it to bond really well.


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 Post subject: Re: Top Tips for DIY Splits
PostPosted: Tue Nov 16, 2010 11:45 am 
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Joined: Tue Jan 29, 2008 12:37 pm
Posts: 139
Location: East of the Cascades, Wa
We just split 3 boards and I can honestly say that using a table saw is hands down the best method for cutting boards. We made one jig and used it for 3 totally different boards (164 Snow Mullet Banana, 165 Option-camber, and a 154 GNU Barret Christy-camber) and it did near perfect cuts on all 3.

It took 3 of us working for less than an hour to make the jig and setting up each board took only minutes. The MDF board was about $35 at the local Lowes, and you can get it cheaper from what I have heard. My buddy who was making his 2nd split said that he would have never cut with a circular saw if he had seen the difference in cuts between the two!

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 Post subject: Re: Top Tips for DIY Splits
PostPosted: Tue Nov 16, 2010 1:37 pm 
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Joined: Mon Nov 08, 2010 10:50 pm
Posts: 17
While table saw is the best method for at home DIY, if you have access to a water-jet, thats the best option. Costs less than the price for a carbide blade ~$18, incredibly accurate cut, plus the kerf is the size of a human hair.

Also learn from my mistake, use the correct length puck mounting bolts, or you will push your epoxy out the other side!


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 Post subject: Re: Top Tips for DIY Splits
PostPosted: Fri Nov 19, 2010 1:58 pm 
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Joined: Fri Nov 19, 2010 12:51 pm
Posts: 63
Location: Düsseldorf, Germany
First of all hi there. I really like this forum. Have been a snowshoe climber so far, but now have 2 burtons a dragon and an omen I want to split. Since they both have the (dreaded) 3D hole pattern I called a water jet cutting place. He said min. order is €50. I'll see how it turns out and post.


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 Post subject: Re: Top Tips for DIY Splits
PostPosted: Wed Dec 01, 2010 1:52 pm 
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Joined: Mon Nov 29, 2010 2:54 pm
Posts: 1
Just paid a visit to Modern Mechanical in Champlain, NY(1 hr south of Montreal, close to Adirondacks and Northern VT). They split my board with a waterjet for 60$. It took about 20 minutes between setup and splitting, and they took their time since it was the first time they had ever done it... They were curious to try it, and I was happy to oblige. Compared to the cost of a thin kerf carbide tipped sawblade and the hassle of setup for me to do it, I really think this is the way to go if a place like this is available. In my opinion, if you can get this service done for under 100$, it's totally worth it. It doesn't matter what your board is made of or how much metal is involved- it will come out as perfect as you could ever hope. The people at MM were really nice and genuinely curious about the project. Their website: http://www.modmechfab.com/
My board being chopped on the waterjet:
http://www.facebook.com/album.php?aid=2 ... 6026138698
Cheers,
Matt
P.S: Another nearby location with a waterjet said that it would cost me 500$. Hilarious.


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