Forums Splitboard Talk Forum Winter Camping from a Vehicle
Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 46 total)
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  • #580195
    Jackschranz
    40 Posts

    Hey Guys
    I plan to do a lot of Splitting using my vehicle as my base this winter and wondered if you have any tips/feedback/ideas to make it that much easier. I’ve got a panel van which is big enough for a double matters in the back. Any thoughts are greatly appreciated. Will be the first time I’ve used a vehicle for this purpose.
    Thanks
    Martin

    #677785
    ieism
    298 Posts

    I’m a newbie at this too, although I’ve spend a few nights in cars snowboarding before. But I’ve started building a small car a few weeks ago and have tested it a bit. I’ve used losts of Armacell insulation. You can probably find a similar closed cell insulation cheap in the US. Covered all the bare metal inside the car with it, floor, and the insides of doors too. Panel vans have thin walls, so to me this was essential. It also helps with making the car less noisy. Turns out this stuff is really a lot like the camping matress material, but thicker and more comfortable. So I’ve used it for the beds too, it’s really warm to sleep on! I think a regular matress will get wet and is not rellly suited for camping.

    My car doesn’t have a heating system or anything in it, so insulated everything instead. A bigger van will also be harder to stay warm in than a small hatchback or something.

    Get some kind of curtain to close of the cargo space from the cabin, or you’ll be scraping ice of the inside of your windows in the morning. Crack a window open to get a bit of ventilation. I use a small strip of waterproof tent cotton to prevent snow and wind blowing in, attach with magnets.

    I’ll post a picture of the inside as soon as I can find my camera again…

    http://flatlandsplitfest.com/

    #677786
    ozsnowbum
    62 Posts

    2 months in japan and a week in iceland last winter from a rental hatchback.
    its basically luxury winter camping.
    slept on my exped downmat every day, sleeping bag, stove.
    pee bottle is probably the most important piece of kit.
    hot water ready to go in a thermos is pretty good idea to get your morning meal/coffee going.
    remember to park on a flat hill so you sleep well.
    theres not much to it.

    #677787
    swanny
    189 Posts

    Try cutting cardboard to fit in the windows. Look for double wall closed cell like from a refrigerator packing box. And I found a heater blanket that plugs into the car 12v socket.

    #677788
    BobGnarly
    220 Posts

    To set up properly for a whole season you want to add a second battery that is isolated through a VSR. Google it. Its a must have.
    Run all your accessories off the second battery, even if you run it dead flat your car will still start.
    Carry jumper leads, shovel and a recovery strap.
    Buy a nice big gas burner for cooking, dont rely on jetboils etc, they are too small to rely on for a season. Cook real meals 😉
    Take a bucket with your toiletries in it, a whores bath can make you feel like a human again 😉
    A cheap synthietic chamois is good for wiping away condensation in the morning.
    A hot engine is good for drying stuff out
    Keep a full tank of fuel, it could save your life in a massive blizzard.
    Antifreeze!!!
    Keep a window cracked when you are inside, a bit of 2″ tape in the door frame can stop snow blowing straight in the window

    #677789
    ACheateaux
    16 Posts

    @swanny wrote:

    Try cutting cardboard to fit in the windows. Look for double wall closed cell like from a refrigerator packing box. And I found a heater blanket that plugs into the car 12v socket.

    Even better is reflextix, a tin foil bubble wrap kinda insulation found at Lowes.

    #677790
    ieism
    298 Posts

    First trip of the season is done, few nights in the car at blow freezing temperatures. It doesn’t get that cold if the car is somewhat insulated.

    It’s not so bad. I can go from driving to sleeping in about 5 minutes, without even getting out of the car. the bed rests on the front seat and half of it comes out when driving.

    I was in an old thin summer sleeping bag, and typically woke up at 4:30 because of the cold. Start the engine (diesel) and heater and 15 minutes later the car is completey hot inside again. May have to fabricate a remote start button though.. Also nice to wake up and get dressed in a warm car.
    I bet with any kind of cheap winterbag it would be very warm indeed. Also not much moisture because of the heater being on, this works pretty well.
    You’ll lose most of your heat through the windows, so a simple curtain or some bubblewrap will go a long way.

    http://flatlandsplitfest.com/

    #677791
    Jefe009
    675 Posts

    Roof box goes a long way for me, just throw all your riding stuff up there then you don’t have it floating around your car in a mess at night when you’re trying to sleep in there.

    +1 for big dual burner stove.

    Yeah for the mobile splitting lifestyle it doesn’t get any better or easier than sleeping in your rig.

    www.splitlife.net

    #677792
    HikeforTurns
    1113 Posts
    #677793
    splitn2
    125 Posts

    @jefe009 wrote:

    Roof box goes a long way for me, just throw all your riding stuff up there then you don’t have it floating around your car in a mess at night when you’re trying to sleep in there.

    +1 for big dual burner stove.

    Yeah for the mobile splitting lifestyle it doesn’t get any better or easier than sleeping in your rig.

    Re “big dual burner stove” just be careful cooking or trying to heat with gas in a confined space that you have heaps of ventilation, otherwise it can be a pretty nasty outcome if the CO gets you….. there have been plenty of cases where people have just nodded off when the CO gas got to them and nailed them…….. I’m really not sure if I would do that at all without all windows and doors open. I’d go with the warm sleeping bag !

    Richard Harcourt
    WWW.SPLITN2.COM
    New Zealand Splitboard Equipment Specialist
    Spark R&D | Fitwell Backcountry / Freeride | SPLITN2 Custom Splitboards
    e: sales@splitn2.com
    p: +64 3 3266585

    #677794
    Jefe009
    675 Posts

    Good point! I would never use a stove in an enclosed space, I use mine on the tailgate when I’m standing out back.

    Yeah don’t kill yourself by using the stove in your car with no ventilation. 😆 :scratch:

    Also, better to have a sleeping bag that’s too warm than not warm enough. You can always open it up to cool down, but it’s a long long night when you’re not sleeping cuz it’s too cold.

    @splitn2 wrote:

    @jefe009 wrote:

    Roof box goes a long way for me, just throw all your riding stuff up there then you don’t have it floating around your car in a mess at night when you’re trying to sleep in there.

    +1 for big dual burner stove.

    Yeah for the mobile splitting lifestyle it doesn’t get any better or easier than sleeping in your rig.

    Re “big dual burner stove” just be careful cooking or trying to heat with gas in a confined space that you have heaps of ventilation, otherwise it can be a pretty nasty outcome if the CO gets you….. there have been plenty of cases where people have just nodded off when the CO gas got to them and nailed them…….. I’m really not sure if I would do that at all without all windows and doors open. I’d go with the warm sleeping bag !

    www.splitlife.net

    #677795
    sdmarkus
    407 Posts

    Sweet rig ieism!

    Combo of the reflectix and a buddy or catalytic propane heater work pretty well in my camper all winter. Just make sure you vent well as I believe they typically deplete the o2 and/or produce co2 as a byproduct as has been said. This also helps minimize condensation inside the rig which can be typical in an enclosed space.

    A quality pee jug is of course critical 😆

    #677796
    TEX
    2486 Posts

    Great timing! Setting up my new rig this month for winter. I keep a truck for 10 years and then go get a new one. Last July I traded in the old horse ( 2003 Sierra) for the new mount ( 2014 Silverado) . Now Im getting tires, camper shell, rack ect.
    Im trying to figure out the bed situation. My previous rig had a full size mattress. Nice for sleeping but only left 2 feet to get dressed in. Thinking about only using half the bed this season with a twin matress. That will allow for my legs to hang down which should be much easier to get dressed in.
    Will have a rooftop thule box on it to so when its time to go from Town to trail I can carry four with gear in complete comfort.

    Mark, what heater do you use? I guess you keep the windows cracked eh?

    #677797
    H.R. Flufnstuf
    97 Posts

    Reflectix is a great suggestion as are many listed above. Baby wipes are great in a pinch for hygiene when you can’t pull the whore’s bath. A space blanket atop the mattress pad will also keep you warmer in a car. I’ve been using this 21′ Class B+ for overnights and long trip; currently in it FT.

    #677798
    sdmarkus
    407 Posts

    @tex wrote:

    Mark, what heater do you use? I guess you keep the windows cracked eh?

    I have one of these, could be overkill in a smaller space(?)

    http://www.amazon.com/Camco-57331-Olympian-Wave-3-Catalytic/dp/B000BUV1RK

    Something like this may be more your speed:

    http://www.amazon.com/Mr-Heater-F215100-3800-BTU-Indoor-Safe/dp/B001CFRF7I/ref=sr_1_cc_3?s=aps&ie=UTF8&qid=1414773993&sr=1-3-catcorr&keywords=buddy+heater

    I leave one of my turnbuckle doors and a roof vent cracked, please be careful. I’ll also carry a cheapo electric heater and extension cord in the event I can poach shore power…

    Congrats on the new rig dude, I’ll bet you can dial that thing in sweet!

    #677799
    Skijor AK
    33 Posts

    My wife, my german shorthair, and I sleep in my 2001 Subaru Outback during Chugach winters. We just follow the snow in Alaska for x-mas and spring break, so a week at a time in-between Anchorage stops. The car-top storage is a must for our skis and boards (and gas cans incase of blizzards!). I also have a bunch of tarps to set up a canopy type system for cooking with the hatch open. A battery powered car starter/jumper is also a must. So is a smartphone. We were sleeping at Thompson Pass during the “Damalanche” but fortunately checked the forecast in time and got out of there.

    We don’t use extra insulation but bring multiple sleeping bags, blankets, and fury friends. Towels are a must in the mornings as the inside of our windows are usually soaked. We have an insulated kennel for the days where the pooch can’t come (moderate avalanche, or powder).

    The nice thing about this system is that skinning up a sketchy mountain is more comfortable than our camp!

    #677800
    powslash
    382 Posts

    @tex wrote:

    Im trying to figure out the bed situation. My previous rig had a full size mattress. Nice for sleeping but only left 2 feet to get dressed in. Thinking about only using half the bed this season with a twin matress. That will allow for my legs to hang down which should be much easier to get dressed in.

    A cot. Get a cot. Cabelas has some burly ones. I’ve tried a few different set-ups for a truck and a cot is my current favorite. Put some sleeping pads on it for cush and warmth. It’s lightweight(mpg’s) and lets you sit sideways to use the other half of the truck bed. A plastic tote works as a nightstand. I especially like a cot on hunting trips because the bed can be packed away small when it’s time to put a deer in the truck bed.

    My 2nd favorite set-up is a futon frame. I put a 3-section futon frame in my Tacoma, make cut-outs in the frame for the wheel wells and the fit is perfect. The bed can be folded into a tailgate couch, sweet, or it folds up forward toward the cab which leaves a good amount of space near the tailgate for getting dressed etc. Assuming a hi-rise cap for headroom….

    #677801
    boardrider247
    61 Posts

    My :twocents: worth
    1. Ventilation is more important then heat when sleeping. Buy a bomber winter bag and keep the windows cracked while sleeping. Better yet have a vent fan. This is the only way to keep from developing your own personal rain forest. Have a buddy heater along to warmup in the mornings and evenings after riding but don’t run it while sleeping.

    2.Ditch the jet boil. Buy a proper white gas camp stove. They work soooooooo much better in cold weather. And don’t cook in your vehicle keep it outdoors. Eat real food! Freeze dried meals should only be a emergency last resort.

    3. Boil water with your evening meal and put it in a quality thermos for the morning. Much easier to get up knowing the coffee is ready to go.

    4. .??????

    5. Profit

    6. A couple :guinness: :guinness: :guinness: and a little :doobie: makes for good sleeping no matter the temperature

    #677802
    sdmarkus
    407 Posts

    Tex!..along with the reflectix, you can get rigid foam insulation at the big box stores. Throwing some of that down and around the bed of your truck bed will be huge. My old camper shell had a headliner of sorts, so some insulation up top could be nice as well.

    I like the idea of a custom platform or carpet kit back there with storage underneath, but the cot and/or futon sounds pretty money too!

    #677803
    powslash
    382 Posts

    @sdmarkus wrote:

    I like the idea of a custom platform or carpet kit back there with storage underneath, but the cot and/or futon sounds pretty money too!

    I liked the custom platform idea for awhile too but moved away from it because the cot is turnkey and flexible, if you need to use the truck to haul anything you can just pack the bed away and boom you’re a truck. And carpet in the WA climate will start growing mushrooms quick.

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