Forums DIY and Mods What's it going to weigh: Part 2
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  • #795092
    Scooby2
    596 Posts

    Ok, so of the boards coming out of the Preflex Snowboard shed, I have a sequel coming along to the one I posted about here last year. Same 26.4 width, same thickness, 4 less inserts, about 3cm more tail to be a 168cm board. Same maple rail piece on the heelside, poplar stringer on the toe side. It’s the one on top in the pic below.

    Pretty chunky looking until the deck gets a rolled profile:

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    once the deck was profiled, the core with base and edges was about 4lbs, 13-14 oz. This time we are leaving off the veneer top sheet to shave some more weight and try to get closer to 5lbs (Last year was 5-13oz) and are only adding a couple strips of nylon topsheet in the spots where last season’s board got a bit of wear last season. (This rider skins sidecuts inside.) so we’ll see how much one of these super thin deck laminates weighs.

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    Top sheet strips still have protective layer on until a light sand and clearcoat so they look misty still.

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    I’m hoping for 5.25lbs this time for a 26.4 x 168. Can’t weigh them until I’m done with that, tape on base is removed and base is ground . . .

    #795093
    Scooby2
    596 Posts

    It is crazy how much shows through this carbon fabric, I am going to have use thinner patches of innegra under the locations for the pucks next time. You can see the shadow of every little strand from those patches.

    #795114
    HansGLudwig
    601 Posts

    Looks good bro. Thanks for sharing the stoke.

    Be sure to bookmark Splitboard.com's Recent Activity page...
    http://splitboard.com/activity-2/

    #795312
    Scooby2
    596 Posts

    Thanks Hans. I trimmed the fat around the edges and hand sanded with 400 grit to prep for gloss coat.

    Taping some extra unidirectional carbon fiber along the rails:

    And off to the scale:

    Loving that I’m at 5lbs 5 ounces! Nearly a half pound off last year’s board which was 5lbs, 13oz. I say nearly because the gloss coat is still coming -but there is still a vinyl protective layer on the bottom of the board and a little epoxy on the base to be ground off. Maybe it will even out. Can’t wait to spray it and remove the film from the nylon top sheet pads and see how it ends up looking.

    #795359
    Taylor
    781 Posts

    Rad. Eager to see this beauty all polished up and completed.

    @sun_rocket

    #795364
    vapor
    349 Posts

    Love how you think outside the box

    #795375
    Guy Gaston
    21 Posts

    Super cool Scooby!
    Im about to start building boards myself.

    Would you mind walking me through how you deal with the process of making a split, compared to a regular snowboard? Doing all the reading I can at the skibuilder-forum.
    Do you lay up the board as one, with routed room for the edges in the middle of the core? – Or do you lay it up as two separate skis?

    I have built several surfboards. So i’m familiar in dealing with epoxy and vac.bagging, but wrapping my head around snowboards is a bit more complicated. Theres a lot of information on building regular snowboards. Splitboards not so much.
    Core thicknesses to use? etc. etc.

    #795377
    Taylor
    781 Posts

    Preflex Twin tip, jib board for Taylor

    Scooby’s older posts in the splitboards forum walk through some of that. The link above is useful, in that it describes his thinking on matters of core thickness, stiffness, and rocker. Scooby’s boards, as you’ll read, are designed to be very stiff and rockered (pre-flexed) such that they pivot easily at low speeds and are highly stable in large radius high speed turns. Novel, creative, smart designs that are a blast to ride.

    @sun_rocket

    #795385
    Scooby2
    596 Posts

    Emil,
    As you can see from Taylor’s link that I make the core as a one piece, then separate them, then laminate each separately. Folks do them both ways. The board layup up as one board and then cut later probably match up more perfectly. You just need to make really good templates. I have never tried it that way. I’m usually always changing boards a little and never put a lot of time into templates.

    Also, it is easier to use a full length or almost full length inside edge as it gives you a guide to finish each inside edge when you are removing excess material.

    Have a look at the community skis video, it is a very effective and adjustable process regardless of the core material you use or how you template your core.

    If you use Voile pucks, they are very forgiving of any lack of precision in locating your inserts.

    #795708
    Cascade Cruiser
    15 Posts

    Scooby,
    Nice looking work! I took a look at the Community Skis video you posted, and I have to admit I’m kicking around the idea of starting to build boards for fun. Do you mind sharing how your build up/profile your core? Do you use vac bags & mechanical press/clamps? Any thing I do will be one-off in my garage, so I’m trying to keep it simple. I figure if I’m lucky my first crack could be rideable as a rock board, and I could go from there from year to year. Thanks for the info.

    #795723
    Guy Gaston
    21 Posts

    Looking really good 🙂
    Thanks for your reply.
    May I ask if you have a cad template of the inserts going into a splitboard?
    I have a contact here who can cnc route my cores.

    #795730
    Scooby2
    596 Posts

    Thank you two!

    C. Cruiser: I have the ability to press boards at higher pressure, but I am switching to vacuum. I think that the higher pressure of a press is more useful in managing resin to fiber ratios when you are using inexpensive and thick fiberglass fabrics. In other words, you really want to smash the 19-22 ounce glass fabrics so that much of the heavy resin leaves the mold. Because I am using pretty thin fabrics like Textreme and more runny resins, and good laminating techniques, my weights are low, I don’t have delams and vacuum construction is a good fit for me. The board above was pressed to lay up the base and lower composite layers, then the I shape in the dome on the deck, then I vacuum bag the deck with the whole ski in a basic box oven heated with heat guns. I highly recommend vacuum over building molds and a press. I mean are you crafting boards and experimenting or building a production line? Or maybe build a mold and go the route of a vacuum frame press like Boheme skis. Vacuum gives you the opportunity to tweak curves and make boards, instead of making molds and templates all summer.

    I cut and sand the core outline using past boards and make small tweaks in where the taper starts by eye and sand back to a drawn pencil line. This is absolutely the most fun part other than screwing the last piece of hardware down on a snowy night. I use a router to cut my bases and use each individual board as the template. This only works when the core is thick so the router bearing can land on the board as a template. Once a core is thinned out, you’ll be suffering trying to do it this way and making a separate template will serve you better.

    Emil: I use a ruler and a pencil for the binding inserts. You can see that going down in the second board in the first photo in this thread. On my personal boards or the one for Taylor last year, I go with a custom pattern into custom pucks. I use old Voile sticker templates and an awl to mark where the other hardware goes. So, can’t help you with CAD templates.

    #795735
    Cascade Cruiser
    15 Posts

    Good stuff, thanks for the the info. I have more research ahead of me to get started, but I will definitely be looking for techniques as you have described that allow for creative craftsmanship in building each individual board. I can imagine the rewards are pretty awesome to ride a board that you made in your own shop!

    #795860
    Scooby2
    596 Posts

    All glossed up. Scooby1 having final inspection:

    I’m liking how the topsheet patches blend in to a degree. Leaning against Preflex HQ

    And the best part: minus the vinyl tape on the base plus the gloss coat, Plum Hooks (34g total, less 4 screws) screws and voile clips on tip and tail this 168 x 26.5 is at 5lbs 5oz. (5lbs 3oz without anything screwed on.) That’s a half pound under last year’s board with the topsheet and 2 more inserts. The wood for this one was also exceptionally light and shaved about 3oz. Still have hard maple on the heelside and heavier poplar on toe edge.

    . . . closing in on Markus’s 166 x 25.5 2270g (5lb.), maybe about the same.

    #795870
    Taylor
    781 Posts

    So rad. Beautiful board.

    @sun_rocket

    #795874
    vapor
    349 Posts

    Love to see it in action.So who gets your previos builds.

    #795875
    Scooby2
    596 Posts

    thanks! This and previous What’s it going to weigh board are both sold to same 160lb. rider. I’m still getting to know the veneered 187 x 27.5 I made last year, which to me still feels light at just under 8lbs. It bends a little more than my last board and I got launched a few times from the rebound so I’m trying to decide if I like that much kick or want to go stiffer next time.

    Before that the only previous boards I have are poplar cores, some finished, some half done and are more like what boards normally weigh these days.

    [

    #795926
    Snurfer
    1438 Posts

    Fine work there Scooby. Thanks for sharing the process.

    @topodojo

    @topodojo IG
    Shark Snowsurf Chuna
    Voile V-Tail 170 BC
    Voile One Ninety Five
    Spark R&D Arc

    #826497
    Snurfer
    1438 Posts

    @scooby2 Figured I reply here (re: the Amplid thread)

    I’m riding a 143 Shark Chuna (36cm nose) and its obviously lighter than my split. Actually its quite a bit lighter than the wooden snurfs built up in Logan. Its primarily bamboo. Very happy with the design and the ride, but I’d like to recreate it with lighter materials and construction, as well as apply the techniques and materials to a set of mini approach skis.

    Funny you should mention Andy. I only recent met him this past fall at a board swap. He brought a dozen or so of his boards and I got to chat with him for an hour or so. Really shockingly light boards and what got my mind on this topic. I’d already ordered the Shark but hadn’t received it or I’d likely have bought one of Andy’s snurfs.

    Having got the Shark it’s still pretty light but hiking with it, avy gear, verts and potentially mini skis ramps the total load nearly back up to splitboard territory. Thus my curiosity about your construction techniques. I’d definitely like to get a hold of Andy as he mentioned he made reasonably priced micro skis as well. Does he have a web presence of some sort?

    In any event, thanks for replying and no worries about your availability or desire to build something like this. I’m in the midst of rebuilding financially after exploring semi-retirement for a year, so my commitment and resources to build such a thing is aimed at 19/20 riding.

    Cheers!

    @topodojo IG
    Shark Snowsurf Chuna
    Voile V-Tail 170 BC
    Voile One Ninety Five
    Spark R&D Arc

    #826501
    Scooby2
    596 Posts

    He has this site with contact info.
    http://starshipcustoms.com/

    Talk to me this summer if you are still looking and thinking about a super light snow surf with a ptex base.

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