Forums Splitboard Talk Forum Ultralight Splitboarding – Save kilograms or pounds and perform better
Viewing 17 posts - 21 through 37 (of 37 total)
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  • #814032
    FloImSchnee
    287 Posts

    I also wouldn’t want 5-10 minutes for my partner just to drink.
    You for sure lose more time by melting snow to drink it, as for the additional effort for 0,5-2 litres of water in your backpack.

    #814033
    downthemtn
    17 Posts

    A 20 oz nalgene in the pack with nuun tablets or Gatorade powder and another fold-able 16oz sawyer on the body with a nuun tablet or Gatorade powder. Use the fold-able first and then the 20oz. Whether I bring both or one is dependent on the objective for a one day tour.

    This helps reduce pack weight/lost volume by not needing a huge nalgene that takes up alot of space. By adding the nuun/gatorade it will reduce the freezing point slightly. If it gets real cold use a coozy on the nalgene or make one out of reflectix.

    Reflectix Construction Go By
    https://backpackinglight.com/forums/topic/17522/

    #814050
    ozsnowbum
    60 Posts

    whistlermaverick, i’d hate to be your touring partner. let me have a quick drink. waits 30 minutes to boil water and let it cool down. *rolls eyes*

    i dunno why you’d boil and cool water?? Jamie just melts snow!!
    you do have snow where you go snowboarding, no??
    takes about 5-10 mins and he has plenty of water to offer his partners, which is nice.
    you just gotta make sure you replenish your electrolytes, snow is pure

    light is right for sure, as long as performance and durability are covered.

    you’re right but my point still stands, its pretty absurd to think its better to carry 500g of stove/fuel to melt water vs just carrying 2litres of water for a day.

    #814065
    karkis
    260 Posts

    I also wouldn’t want 5-10 minutes for my partner just to drink.
    You for sure lose more time by melting snow to drink it, as for the additional effort for 0,5-2 litres of water in your backpack.

    you mean you rip shred all day and don’t take a few 5-10 min breaks??

    i shouldn’t speak for @whistlermaverick cuz i can’t remember exactly how he works it (i was taking 4:20 min breaks for his 5-10 mins)… but when i take my stove i also take a 500mL wide mouth bottle… then ya don’t have to fire up the stove every time ya drink.
    And it helps to put 100mL water in the pot when you start to melt the snow, so you don’t burn the pot with dry snow.
    (it happens – bottom of snow in pot melts and evaporates but the plug doesn’t settle to the bottom and the bottom overheats, yuck! if you have no water you gotta start with the stove on low and keep pushing the snow down until the bottom is well wet)

    Say ya take 3 or 4 breaks in a day (15 mins each) then you can fill your belly and your bottle, and your partner’s too. each person could use a small bottle or maybe 1L size, saving 1 to 1.5 kg each. And you have an added margin of safety – more hydrated, with the ability to make hot tea or soup if an emergency or overtime situation arises.

    But each to their own i guess, i ride NS boards at 167cm, and I’m as likely to take steel as aluminum if i think i’ll need sharps. You guys are the weight weenies! I would just think its cheaper to save 1 – 1.5 kg with a stove rather than spending squillions on stuff that’ll disintegrate when you hit a rock.
    Absurd is as absurd does, jus sayin!!

    never summer snowboards
    phantom splitboard bindings
    dynafit touring

    #814086
    ozsnowbum
    60 Posts

    I also wouldn’t want 5-10 minutes for my partner just to drink.
    You for sure lose more time by melting snow to drink it, as for the additional effort for 0,5-2 litres of water in your backpack.

    you mean you rip shred all day and don’t take a few 5-10 min breaks??

    i shouldn’t speak for @whistlermaverick cuz i can’t remember exactly how he works it (i was taking 4:20 min breaks for his 5-10 mins)… but when i take my stove i also take a 500mL wide mouth bottle… then ya don’t have to fire up the stove every time ya drink.
    And it helps to put 100mL water in the pot when you start to melt the snow, so you don’t burn the pot with dry snow.
    (it happens – bottom of snow in pot melts and evaporates but the plug doesn’t settle to the bottom and the bottom overheats, yuck! if you have no water you gotta start with the stove on low and keep pushing the snow down until the bottom is well wet)

    Say ya take 3 or 4 breaks in a day (15 mins each) then you can fill your belly and your bottle, and your partner’s too. each person could use a small bottle or maybe 1L size, saving 1 to 1.5 kg each. And you have an added margin of safety – more hydrated, with the ability to make hot tea or soup if an emergency or overtime situation arises.

    But each to their own i guess, i ride NS boards at 167cm, and I’m as likely to take steel as aluminum if i think i’ll need sharps. You guys are the weight weenies! I would just think its cheaper to save 1 – 1.5 kg with a stove rather than spending squillions on stuff that’ll disintegrate when you hit a rock.
    Absurd is as absurd does, jus sayin!!

    each to their own. This is seriously the first time I’ve even heard of anyone doing this stove/drinking thing.
    For me, the weight saving just doesnt justify the massive inconvenience of stopping to mess around with all that shit, vs taking a sip through my camel while I don’t even lose a stride. (and no I haven’t ever had a problem with my camel freezing)

    #814099
    vapor
    347 Posts

    Your camel must get a good workout then.

    #814142
    genepires
    5 Posts

    the bringing of a stove to hydrate is a standard big technical mountain thing. Carrying the required amount of fluid on a technical climb is crazy so it makes sense to make as you go.
    But a day splitboarding is something different where the weight on back restrictions are less.

    BUt you have to admit that what could be better than a hot cocoa, coffee or soup in the middle of the day? cold gatorade? ugh.

    A benefit of carrying the stove is the unlikely chance of being overnighted in the BC. Having hot drinks could make a desperate situation bearable or pleasantly memorable.

    #814165
    Mansi
    43 Posts

    Hey guys,

    is this discussion really necessary (for the normal guys of us)? Of course a light setup helps to save energy and to fill out ones day even better. To be honest, is it really important to climb or ride some percentage more in a day, to be 5min faster than ones friends or to be able to catch skiers?

    Its all about fun and enjoying good times in the mountains not about weight! Light weight parts mostly dont are as stable and longline than normal parts.

    I`m doing a lot of sports all the time, in the past also competitions in running and cycling and what I hated most in these times that everybody focused on his equipment (bikes etc.) and quantity in training. Nearly nobody tried to improve his mental power or technique and most of these guys never had a smile in their faces.

    Go out have fun, make your thoughts about weight of your equipment but always focus on enjoying the day and not about how much you drink and what or any other senseless facts. Instead of making thoughts about equipment go out and have fun, if there`s no snow go biking, running, swimming, climbing, enjoy nature and life and you will forget about saving pounds and just focus on getting out.

    Heres my setup for days with 1500 to 2500m first track skinning and 4 to 7hours, I dont know how much pounds but it works and makes fun:
    Boards: Chimera Mace 172, SG-Snowboards 160, G3 Scape Goat 162cm
    Binding: Spark Dyno
    Crampons: G3, Dynafit 130mm
    Skins: G3, Kohla, Contour
    Shoes: TLT5, TLT6, Arcteryx
    Airbag: Mammut Protection 3.0 30l
    Helmet, sun and snow glasses, Shovel, poles, gloves, (additional) clothes, beacon, camera 1-2l to drink, muesli bars…..
    Sometimes lamp, rope, ice axe, climbing stuff and ice crampons

    www.splitboardtouren.at

    #814231
    buell
    517 Posts

    Hey guys,

    is this discussion really necessary (for the normal guys of us)? Of course a light setup helps to save energy and to fill out ones day even better. To be honest, is it really important to climb or ride some percentage more in a day, to be 5min faster than ones friends or to be able to catch skiers?

    Its all about fun and enjoying good times in the mountains not about weight! Light weight parts mostly dont are as stable and longline than normal parts.

    If you consider yourself a “normal guy” and don’t consider a discussion about light weight gear relevant to you, that is fine. I don’t see the issue with those of us who are interested in the topic discussing it. I sort of get where you are coming from though. When I was 20, I could only afford a heavier mountain bike. That was fine, because I could still out ride most other riders on their expensive, lightweight bikes. I am a decent climber, but plenty of guys (mostly younger) can out climb me with their heavier splitboard gear. It is not about beating anyone to the top.

    At this point (in my later 40s) I enjoy the day more if my set up is light. For me, there is undoubtedly a performance advantage while riding, not just while going uphill. I also have not found a major durability issue with lightweight gear, but things are improving so fast, I don’t typically keep gear for that many years anyway.

    Just an FYI: To say that those of us that like experimenting with gear are not also capable of working hard on our “mental power or technique” is absurd. They are not mutually exclusive.

    #814403
    Mansi
    43 Posts

    @buell

    you are right, I don`t have to read and comment if I´m not interested……

    For me it`s important to have long-lasting, reliable material not more and I´m wondering about people discussing about some grams or the perfect setup instead of searching for the perfect turn……

    I didn`t want to upset, greets Mansi

    www.splitboardtouren.at

    #814412
    buell
    517 Posts

    Hey Mansi, ultimately, we are all after the elation of the perfect turn, we just take very slightly different routes to get there. It is all splitboarding after all.

    #814471
    marran
    16 Posts

    Personally, I think there is a massive elephant in the room here.
    We talk about trimming grams here and there, and then we happily walk around with more than twice as many holes and inserts in the boards than what we actually use.

    And as far as I can make out those big insert things make lightweight board construction even more challenging since they severely limit what can be done with the core of the board. And even the weight weenies have adapter plates between their superlight Dynafit toe pieces and the board, using twice the number of screws that are really needed.

    I have used ski screws to mount dynafit toe pieces to my board for years. It works fine on Venture boards that are solidly built. I have also done it to a K2 Panoramic and it feels a bit iffy but has worked fine for 20 days or so now. (I only use it for early season shark skipping, it is not even half as good as the Ventures when it is time for proper riding.)

    For this year I got a set of ATK SLR Release bindings that I mounted straight on my old Venture Storm. The heel pieces are lighter than a set of voile double height climbing wires and give me a safe heel lockdown mode too for when I feel the need. Combined with the new Phantoms, fixed angle board cleats and Salomon SLabs it should make for a fairly light setup without any compromise whatsoever to the ride.

    I wish there was a board with no inserts whatsoever but instead had “binding mounting zones” just like skis where I could mount board cleats directly with ski screws (or quiver killers), I bet it could be made way lighter and with nicer flex than the swiss cheese we are using now.

    #814481
    Matt Wood
    324 Posts

    I know I’m off topic, but is anyone using the MSR Pocket rocket as there lightwieght stove set up? I’m including this in my kit this year. I purchased a soloist pot, mug kinda deal that fits the stove and fuel. I can’t remember the brand, it’s wrapped under the tree pretending to be for my wife;) I’m excited for some hot spiced cider! Additionally I’m a drinker and rarely leave the house for a tour with less than 2 1/2 liters. Not this season, maybe this old man can spin again with a pack on.

    #814571
    SkateBananas
    175 Posts

    Ive been using this stove backpacking into september and october for 3 years now. It has a pretty good following in the ultralight backpacking community. Similar to the MSR but lighter and cheaper. I bought mine for less than $5 when they were first introduced. They can still be found on ebay pretty cheap. Only weights 25 grams

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B06XNLSNFR/ref=asc_df_B06XNLSNFR5312849/?tag=hyprod-20&creative=395033&creativeASIN=B06XNLSNFR&linkCode=df0&hvadid=238384334134&hvpos=1o1&hvnetw=g&hvrand=4010877716749450417&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9029146&hvtargid=pla-391301552046

    #814773
    Mike
    10 Posts

    Very interesting thread.

    Spare liner gloves are a great idea. Worth putting them in a ziploc bag as I have had gear inside my pack get wet as a result of it sitting on the snow during breaks/transitions.

    One piece of lightweight gear recently recommended to me by a guide was this jacket, which he likes for the uptrack. I’d never though to take a separate jacket for that reason, but it makes some sense.

    #814778
    Scooby2
    549 Posts

    Marran,
    I hear you on insert weight. When you work super hard to make a spotlight board, it is inconsistent to put .25 lbs of inserts in it. For a board selling north of 1000, they should be titanium. Ski screws work for a board I make for myself, but probably do not meet the ISO standard for screw retention which is likely the standard a mfg. will be sued under if not met.

    I don’t know if the aluminum slider tracks are lighter, they might be. Also, most production boards are around 7 to 8 mm thick which isn’t a lot for screw retention. 11-12 mm or more is a lot better to hold a ski screw.

    I’m not ready yet for the expense of titanium inserts, it is enough to use less steel ones for a custom board, but hopefully the industry will go there eventually. I would be real interested to know if 7000 series aluminum with a 7000 series m8 screw meets the ISO standard. Or how strong a ski screw is to pull out of hard maple or denser hardwood. There are numbers out there for standard screws but they have a lot less thread width.

    #815219
    marran
    16 Posts

    I guess a problem is that there are only 2 screws per board cleat in the case of Phantom (and I see no reason to not ride Phantoms, especially on a lightweight setup), so the leverage will be quite high compared to the 4 or so screws that typically hold each end of a ski binding. So the binding mounting zone needs to be really solid, possibly both hardwood and titanal plates. It would be very interesting to do some pull out force tests, maybe this summer…
    The easiest thing to do would be to find an old ski and bolt on a binding cleat with a long lever to just see how much it takes to pull the screws out.

    The problem with getting an insertless board made without having done the measurements oneself is that I’m not sure it would be easy to sell the idea to a board manufacturer since they are so used to working with inserts, and might not be comfortable with ski screw retention and mounting, and small ski manufacturer who could make a custom split and are used to binding mounting zones and such have no clue about flex patterns and shapes for boards.

    I could settle with 3 proper screw inserts for each cleat, giving one centered and one more setback stance, and no inserts for walk mode since it is just unnecessary anyway. A minimalist Milligram perhaps, can you hear me Amplid?

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