Forums The Gear Room Tent or Bivy
Viewing 17 posts - 1 through 17 (of 17 total)
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  • #577257
    Bosshog
    4 Posts

    Hi guys (and girls).

    I’m really new to splitboarding, having only done two days so far on borrowed and hired equipment. (in australia)

    Wan’t to get into it a lot more next season but need to get together gear for day and overnight trips and was wondering what peoples opinions are on bivy’s or tents when snow camping.

    I’ve done many a camping trip with a bivy only (solo and with groups). I like it because it cuts down on wight and space. Also i’ve only used light weight summer ones that i don’t believe would be appropriate in the snow.

    #658864
    firstlight
    721 Posts

    Bosshog
    Go for a good 4 Season tent. Trust me!
    Been out too may times when the weather comes in from nowhere and you get your ARSE KICKED!
    Like this 4 day trip near Kosi
    Started off Blue bird with just a chance of an increase in wind strength.
    Ended with busted tent poles,digging out every two hours and finding shelter in a Hut for 3 days with 20 others!

    Started nice
    Digging a flat platform in late Spring! nice conditions T-Shirt only

    Ended up Digging out the tent every 2 hours

    The happy bunch in the Hut after 3 days of hellish conditions.

    Finally got the hell out off there

    Poor man buys twice!
    Cheers

    Adam West

    www.firstlightsurfboards.com.au
    www.firstlightsnowboards.com.au
    www.splitfest.com.au
    www.snowsafety.com.au
    www.mrbc.com.au
    www.backcountryglobal.com
    www.alpinefirstaid.com.au

    #658865
    BobGnarly
    220 Posts

    @firstlight wrote:

    Do many murders happen in them there huts?

    #658866
    firstlight
    721 Posts

    BOB
    Thats what spending 3 days in each others pockets does to some people!
    I call it character building 😆
    You not down there this weekend?
    Cheers

    Adam West

    www.firstlightsurfboards.com.au
    www.firstlightsnowboards.com.au
    www.splitfest.com.au
    www.snowsafety.com.au
    www.mrbc.com.au
    www.backcountryglobal.com
    www.alpinefirstaid.com.au

    #658867
    BobGnarly
    220 Posts

    Went friday night, 100klm+ winds at island bend, snow turned to slush on sat, came back to car and had a flat tyre, changed that, hands frozen solid, wet through, got changed and drove home lol.

    #658868
    firstlight
    721 Posts

    Bosshog
    @bobgnarly wrote:

    Went friday night, 100klm+ winds at island bend, snow turned to slush on sat, came back to car and had a flat tyre, changed that, hands frozen solid, wet through, got changed and drove home lol.

    I think we have a second for getting a good 4 Season tent for the ozzie conditions!

    Adam West

    www.firstlightsurfboards.com.au
    www.firstlightsnowboards.com.au
    www.splitfest.com.au
    www.snowsafety.com.au
    www.mrbc.com.au
    www.backcountryglobal.com
    www.alpinefirstaid.com.au

    #658869
    aliasptr
    282 Posts

    Yep I’d say it’s all about the conditions you expect and your willingness to suffer.

    In California during a high pressure system you can get away with just sleeping out in your bag! It’s usually warm enough and with a trench you are protected from any wind.

    I have also used snow caves and they are awesome but they take a lot of time.

    I use a tarp style shelter for all my winter camping, the Black Diamond Beta Light. This is usually in good weather though, in California, and for a weekend trip . I have had it in some good snow storms but not in the alpine with wicked winds or anything. I did have to shovel every couple hours to keep the walls from creeping in on me.

    If I was to do more extended mountaineering trips into the Alpine more often I would probably really want, and need, that 4 season tent.

    Until then I am much happier carrying a 19 oz shelter that sleeps me and my wife comfortably and fits our overnight gear. The venting can be tricky though!

    #658870
    christoph benells
    717 Posts

    :thumbsdown: bivy :thumbsup: mega mid

    #658863
    Jefe009
    675 Posts

    I just got a beta light. I think anything that lets you dig down as far as you want will be good for protecting you from the weather.

    Although like other have said it really depends on the conditions of where you are going.

    Personally, I’d rather carry a super light shelter, and if the weather is worse than expected you can always snow cave it.

    Also, tarp style shelters are lighter and much cheaper than bivvies or 4 season tents.

    :twocents:

    www.splitlife.net

    #658871
    aliasptr
    282 Posts

    @jefe009 wrote:

    I just got a beta light. I think anything that lets you dig down as far as you want will be good for protecting you from the weather.
    :twocents:

    How do you rock that with the Beta? I have contemplated a number of different strategies for digging while leaving snow columns for where the poles go.. And also thought about using the loops outside and running a line when I’m around trees.

    Dug in sleeping ledges? Stairway in? Voile strap two pairs of poles for super long supports?

    With snow you’re almost limited to only your creativity and I guess mine sucks when thinking about the Beta. Any photos of an especially sweet set up? Thanks!.”

    Reminds me of the part in Deeper where Travis Rice goes, “Island kitchens are just so hot right now” Cracks me up!

    #658872
    chronicracing
    162 Posts

    I’m for Bivy. I think a waterproof bivy sack is essential in any winter overniter.

    If I’m below tree line, I rock a tarp and hammock. Fortified with snow if needed. Off the ground, in a sack, on a pad, floating in a hammock. I’ve weathered many condtions with this set up.

    Above tree line. It’s dependent upon condtions. Wind breaks, pits, combinations w/ tarp, poles, and rope. If it’s really nasty outside, you can’t beat a snow cave. No wind, a constant 32 deg, is comforting.

    Army surplus bivy sack $40
    8′ x 10′ tarp $10
    parachute hammock $20

    It’s a pretty cheap and lightweight way to roll. :guinness:

    #658873
    Jefe009
    675 Posts

    @aliasptr wrote:

    @jefe009 wrote:

    I just got a beta light. I think anything that lets you dig down as far as you want will be good for protecting you from the weather.
    :twocents:

    How do you rock that with the Beta? I have contemplated a number of different strategies for digging while leaving snow columns for where the poles go.. And also thought about using the loops outside and running a line when I’m around trees.

    Dug in sleeping ledges? Stairway in? Voile strap two pairs of poles for super long supports?

    With snow you’re almost limited to only your creativity and I guess mine sucks when thinking about the Beta. Any photos of an especially sweet set up? Thanks!.”

    Reminds me of the part in Deeper where Travis Rice goes, “Island kitchens are just so hot right now” Cracks me up!

    I just got it on sale over the summer and haven’t used it yet. I did a bunch of overnights last season (in a tent) and never once slept above treeline. So my thinking is that I can just string a paracord super taut between trees and hold up the middle that way. In a pinch or without good trees I guess I can rock the ski pole, although finding a way to extend the pole through snow columns or two poles connected sounds good…

    In WA and OR we have trees to around 6-7k feet, and I’m not aware of any huge advantage to sleeping out above that, for the type of tours my crew does anyway.

    I did a bunch of reading on forums about various tarps, diy solutions, etc. and it seems like most people think the key to getting a good setup with the beta light (or similar tarp) is to spend several hours doing the seam sealing and guy it out really tight when you’re using it. Plus snow walls around the outside perimiter if it’s windy.

    Of course I’ll try out some different configs and take a bunch of photos when I’m out in the field this season. Some of the different things I’m planning on trying out…

    Stairway in
    Pee corner
    Kitchen shelf with water making station
    ‘Fridge’ dug into a wall
    Intentional branches left sticking out of the interior walls to hang things on

    I got a lot of good ideas from this book. And the illustrations are pretty hilarious.

    http://www.amazon.com/Allen-Really-Backcountry-Revised-Better/dp/0762745851

    I’m super lazy so I’m all about easy solutions. I’ll post photos and beta on what I find works well, or not… If I can get the wife to sleep in this thing one night I’ll consider the whole thing a success! :mrgreen:

    www.splitlife.net

    #658874
    shredgnar
    643 Posts

    Bivys suck for anything other than emergencies. I’ve used them a fair amount and I always end up with it wrapped around my face and doing my best not to panic and get all claustrophobic. Seriously, I’ve rarely had a good full nights sleep in a bivy.

    My Mega Mid however, is the shit. So much room in there, you can dig it out, set it up with poles, or tear a branch off a tree or hang it from a tree. It’s been pelted with 4 inches of hail and stood up like a champ. I really like the Mid and it’s smaller and lighter than most bivys. I like the beta mid too but there’s less room and harder to dig out underneath because you have to extend two poles.

    #658875
    Powder_Rider
    498 Posts

    I would go with a Brooks Range Mountaineering Tent, I have their Rocket Tent.

    See http://brooks-range.com/Tents/

    http://brooks-range.com/Propel-2D.html

    28 sq ft
    2- 6.6 sq ft vestibules one on each end
    “84 x 48 x 38”
    Min weight 2lb 5oz without poles

    Use your ski poles and avalanche probe.

    For short day trips I carry a UltraLite Alpini Shelter 200 (Bothe)

    For tarps tents I like the BD Mega Mid, Goliite Hex 3 tent, and the MSR Twin Sister (comes with snow flaps). See

    http://cascadedesigns.com/msr/tents/essential-series/twin-sisters/product

    #658877
    barrows
    1490 Posts

    For winter, a good four season tent is my choice for around here. For a single night out in spring, with a good forecast, one can get away with a bivy or superlight tent. In winter the days are short, and storms can come, and generally one is going to be spending a lot of hours in the tent, and there needs to be enough space to be comfortable, and cook inside, etc.
    If you have enough energy, and are going to be camping for a few days, a large teepe style (floorless shelter) like those made by Mountain Hardware can work well, but you will have to dedicate a fair amount of time and energy to digging it down into the snow to make a suitable shelter to be roomy enough and strong enough to spend considerable time in.

    #658878

    The moment I saw the word Mega mid I knew I needed to make a post. Its awesome! Any season, anywhere, Get a megamid!!!!

    #658876
    Yoda
    264 Posts

    +1 for a teepee/floor-less type tent.
    You should check out Nemo’s Pentalite. It sleeps up to 3 people comfortably for winter applications. It has a dedicated area for gear and/or cooking and is much easier to set it up tight (verses the competition) due to it’s shape. At just under 3.5lbs it’s the best winter tent that I’ve ever used. Note: I’ve also used GoLite, Mtn Hardware, Garuda, and Blackdiamond teepee tents as well. http://www.nemoequipment.com/nemo2012-pentalite2012-tent
    Nemo’s Transform Tarp is another teepee type option. It sleeps up to 2 people comfortably for winter use and is just over 2.5lbs. It doesn’t set up as nice as the Pentalite, but it gets the job done wonderfully.
    http://www.nemoequipment.com/nemo2012-Transform-Tarp-tent

    Personally I would avoid a bivy because you’ll want space to store your gear out of the elements and/or for cooking. I’ve done the bivy thing during the winter and will never do it again.

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