Forums Splitboard Talk Forum Splitboard vs Solid board
Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 25 total)
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  • #574360
    tsondaboy
    119 Posts

    I am in a debate with a friend about and would like to hear whats the popular vote on this one among fellow splitters.

    Provided that, you have the same shape of board as a split board and solid board and relatively easy access to the goods either by snowshoeing or splitting. Would you prefer to do a 35-40 deg slope using your split or going on snowshoes so that you can do it with a solid board? In other words, would you prefer to do a 35-40 deg slope on a split board or solid board?

    #636271
    Snurfer
    1448 Posts

    There is no way I would carry a board and snow shoes after having a splitboard
    My analytical brain function when carving is probably on par with Homer Simpson
    Do people seriously obsess over this kind of shit when they are riding?

    Shark Snowsurf Chuna
    Voile V-Tail 170 BC
    Voile One Ninety Five
    Spark R&D Arc

    #636272
    snobeast
    8 Posts

    there’s really nothing to debate here. i laugh (mostly to myself) at my partners that i drag along with slowshoes, i don’t miss carrying my board on my back only to have to shred down with snowshoes in its place.. really no question i’ll take the splitty any day.

    #636273
    tsondaboy
    119 Posts
    #636274
    vapor
    350 Posts

    Debates like this over the internet are useless, pretty funny them talking about 35/40 slope as being something extreme?? Fact is conditions and terrain can be variable where either will have the advantage but splits are more versatile and used 99% of the time when its 100 yards further away from the resort. the rest are wannabes

    #636275
    KGN
    215 Posts

    Not 100 percent sure what your asking..If your asking would I rather ride a solid board over a split on a steep slope, ignoring all other benefits of travel ease in shoes vs split, then yes, I would probably ride a solid. Lighter and whatnot, maybe stiffer for harder stuff. That being said, I dont notice much difference at all riding my prior at the hill. In powder, I notice zero difference.

    The weight on my feet and legs is a little annoying when on the lift, especially when a bunch of wankers insist on riding the lift up max capacity when there only 5 people in the lift line :scratch: and I cant rest it on my leg or whatever.

    I dont ever want to carry my board on my back again to be honest, even though I still feel snowshoes have their place. Sometimes I miss walking straight up a steep hill.But I dont want the weight of the board on my pack, or the annoyance of hitting trees with the tip of my board.

    #636276
    stoudema
    550 Posts

    Splitboard anyday of the week. Why carry the extra weight?

    #636277
    powslash
    382 Posts

    Would you rather win the lottery and be given five years to live OR be granted immortality and forced to live in Texas for eternity?

    #636278
    alessi
    21 Posts

    If you’re talking just about the ride down (ignoring the hike-in), then of course I’d prefer a solid board. The weight difference alone makes for a more lively ride.

    (Not sure what difference the slope angle is supposed to make in your question)

    #636279
    Wasatch_Don
    101 Posts

    No question, I would rather skin up a 35-40 degree slope any day. Steeper than 40 and I would rather boot than use snowshoes.

    The only use for snowshoes is a pleasant walk with the wife to enjoy some together time.

    #636280
    buckchow
    356 Posts

    @powslash wrote:

    Would you rather win the lottery and be given five years to live OR be granted immortality and forced to live in Texas for eternity?

    Even considering Austin, I would probably choose the lottery and 5 years. Good question!

    Here’s one from Chuck Klosterman, a master of hypothetical questions (see http://www.amazon.com/HYPERtheticals-50-Questions-Insane-Conversations/dp/0307587924):

    “Let us assume a fully grown, completely healthy Clydesdale horse has his hooves shackled to the ground while his head is held in place with thick rope. He is conscious and standing upright, but completely immobile. And let us assume that–for some reason–every political prisoner on earth (as cited by Amnesty International) will be released from captivity if you can kick this horse to death in less than twenty minutes. You are allowed to wear steel-toed boots.

    Would you attempt to do this?”

    Also, to the original poster: SPLITBOARDING IS THE ANSWER

    #636281
    buckchow
    356 Posts

    Edit:

    @buckchow wrote:

    … You are allowed to wear the new snowboard boots from Spark R&D.”

    #636282
    drpw
    89 Posts

    The only political prisoner I care about is already out (DJ Quik), so no, I’d let the horse live.

    #636283
    WhitePine
    503 Posts

    Assuming I’m magically at the top of the slope without snowshoeing or skinning then…

    If its icy hard pack = Solid board. Almost any other condition = either splitboard or solid.

    If I have to ascend I would never use snowshoes.

    #636284
    barrows
    1490 Posts

    I avoided splitboards for many years because I was under the (misguided) impression that a splitboard would not handle the steep terrain as well as a solid board. After 5 seasons on the split, I now realize that I was an idiot to not adopt the splitboard sooner. I have ridden plenty of icy 50 degree+ slopes with no problem on a split, in fact I feel no difference between a split and solid board in technical, steep terrain. It is time for this myth to die, a well setup splitboard, of proper design, can handle technical steeps fine. Splitboards have made descents of some of the most technical lines in this country (Landry line-Pyramid Peak, Ford/Stettner-Grand Teton, North Face-North Maroon Peak, etc). I ride many lines where the consequences of a fall could be quite severe, and I am quite confident in dropping these lines on a split.
    The only rider who might be better off considering a solid board, is the rider doing extremely technical freestyle, where the extra weight of a split will slow rotations and be a little harder to control in the air.

    In other words:

    “SPLITBOARDING IS THE ANSWER”

    #636285
    tsondaboy
    119 Posts

    @barrows wrote:

    I avoided splitboards for many years because I was under the (misguided) impression that a splitboard would not handle the steep terrain as well as a solid board. After 5 seasons on the split, I now realize that I was an idiot to not adopt the splitboard sooner. I have ridden plenty of icy 50 degree+ slopes with no problem on a split, in fact I feel no difference between a split and solid board in technical, steep terrain. It is time for this myth to die, a well setup splitboard, of proper design, can handle technical steeps fine. Splitboards have made descents of some of the most technical lines in this country (Landry line-Pyramid Peak, Ford/Stettner-Grand Teton, North Face-North Maroon Peak, etc). I ride many lines where the consequences of a fall could be quite severe, and I am quite confident in dropping these lines on a split.
    The only rider who might be better off considering a solid board, is the rider doing extremely technical freestyle, where the extra weight of a split will slow rotations and be a little harder to control in the air.

    In other words:

    “SPLITBOARDING IS THE ANSWER”

    What kind of split would you use for technical lines?
    I am in the market to get a new deck for spring conditions and want some ideas. The one I have now is a board tuned for powder, too long, wide and too much taper to do jump turns that easy.
    Was thinking for something with sidecut around 9-10 and no taper.

    #636286
    jbaysurfer
    947 Posts

    @powslash wrote:

    Would you rather win the lottery and be given five years to live OR be granted immortality and forced to live in Texas for eternity?

    Can I travel outside of the state if I choose TX?

    #636287
    jbaysurfer
    947 Posts

    Tsonda,

    You’ve got an obvious bunch of non-splitters cluttering your debate. Non-splitters are really non-qualified opinions. Only splitters have ridden considerable days on both types of setups.

    It’s a pointless debate though. It’s different tools for different things, and short of a coolie that I’m gonna be booting straight up from the highway (in which case I’d bring my solid because it’s a tad bit lighter on my pack), if I’ve got to earn the turns, I’ll be earning them on my splitty.

    #636288
    barrows
    1490 Posts

    “What kind of split would you use for technical lines?
    I am in the market to get a new deck for spring conditions and want some ideas. The one I have now is a board tuned for powder, too long, wide and too much taper to do jump turns that easy.
    Was thinking for something with sidecut around 9-10 and no taper.”

    There are a lot of variables. I would definately go for a long radius sidecut. Check out the custom board Buell had made (there is a thread on this board). For firm steeps (or even soft steeps) I would prefer a sidecut radius of 11 meters or even more. A firmer flex is a good idea. I like to have some taper, as this makes the tail looser and less likely to get caught if doing a windsheild wiper type turn-I can hop turn anything, but you are right, that too much taper can reduce pop off the tail. Taper is fine, as long as it is 10 mm or less. If the widths fit you, check out the Winterstick Severe Terrain series. Or, consider a custom like Buell’s. This spring I am going to experiment with my Venture, the rocker makes it ride really loose, this should help the deeper sidecut behave a little better-we shall see… but ultimately I am considering a custom board for some descents.

    #636289
    barrows
    1490 Posts

    Tsonda:

    I would do something like this (I am 6’1″, and about 170 lbs):

    Length: at least 164
    Edge contact: at least 128 cm
    Sidecut radius: 11-12 meters
    Taper: 4-7 mm
    Flex: stiff
    Profile: early rise tip, small amount of camber (~3-4 mm) through midsection and tail
    Width: 26 cm, I ride mondo 28 boots, remember that boards with shallow sidecut are essentially narrower in comparison to deep sidecut boards with the same waist width.

    Here is the thread with buell’s custom:

    viewtopic.php?f=9&t=10134

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