Forums Splitboard Talk Forum Splitboard Reversion
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  • #796153
    woodyak
    20 Posts

    So I tried splitboarding several years ago by picking up an older used setup. I did enjoy it a lot but I didn’t get to go as much as I wanted. The board I had was heavy with one side of metal and the conversion process was kind of a chore. The connector clips ended up breaking and now it’s in my basement mocking me. In the meantime I got big into XC skiing and picked up a set of backcountry skis with the intention of possibly converting over to skiing full time. Well it’s been 4 years and I’m OK at skiing but I don’t enjoy it like I do boarding. I’m thinking of getting a newer splitboard setup and giving it a go again.

    My buddy has a 5 year old Burton splitty setup that he never used and he’s willing to let it go for cheap. I like the idea of getting back into it for cheap but I don’t want to be disappointed again by the equipment. I kind of like the idea of getting a more powder specific board as my splitty that I could use whenever/wherever there is POW. I also kind of like the option of being able to split on the resort when they have upper parts closed. Are the newer splitty setups solid/light enough to enjoy on lift days? I’m no weight weenie but I do have a nice light all arounder resort board.

    Also, my boots are getting pretty old and beat up. There’s still some life in them but if I’m picking up a splitty I’ll probably want to get something that’s would work better with a splitty. Would I be compromising anything at the resort by picking up a more split friendly boot? I live in New England so I think I’d want something crampon friendly. Any recommendations?

    Cheers!

    #796159
    summersgone
    814 Posts

    I’m not sure what your old full setup was. If you had voile plates, then yeah, it sucked, hard. I wouldn’t base your decision to come back on something from years ago, splitboard equipment has came a long way in the past 5 years.

    Boards weights really are remaining pretty consistent all and all. Some stuff out there certainly makes it lighter like carbon fiber, but you will pay some pretty $. I’d say being new, you don’t need that. Regardless of the lightest board setup, it will still be heavier than any solid board setup, as you have more hardware on the board. I don’t know for sure (I don’t weigh my solid stuff) the difference, but I’d expect 2-3 pounds heavier when you ride. But also, splitboard equipment is riding very good today, and doesn’t feel much different than solid. Also, you need to remember that you are carrying more gear from skins, avy equipment, etc. So just expect and accept that, not much you can do there. As you get more fit, you won’t notice. For perspective, this year I am heading to Japan, and split time on resorts, and I have no plan to bring a solid board.

    Really, some keys to having a good time with equipment is:
    1) Get dedicated splitboard bindings, such as Spark’s. They are ski crampon compatible and being in NE, will be a big help when it gets icy to chuck those on.
    2) Upgrade your boots. Stiffer is better. If you have floppy boots, they suck to hike in all day. If you are budget minded, some Remind liners may bring new life back to them. If you want to use crampons, a lot of new boards have better compatibility than 5 or so years ago.
    3) Powder specific boards are great, but warning that splitboarding isn’t always about over the head powder. By all means a splitboard should be more powder oriented than a park board. Taper is great for spltiboarding. Really up to you there, you have to know where you plan to go and the conditions and make that call. In the northeast (i’m from vt originally), a shorter powder board like the Hovercraft, Burton Fish might be great for most of your days.
    4) Get new and good skins, with tail clips. Non-grippy and blown out glue will ruin a day.
    5) Learn your equipment in a nice environment, like your house before you get in the field. Knowing how it works will make it way less shittier than when you are freezing at the top of a transition trying to figure out how to put on your bindings the first time. Things like learning to flip risers with your pole are also nice tips.

    My opinion is the more you want to spend, the better the experience will be. I personally run a Phantom Hardboot setup (with TLT6s) for the last 3 years, and that is miles better than where I started on voile plate bindings 8 years ago, and better than the spark setup I ran for 3 years. I also have had a chance to tour a bit on a carbon board, and yes, they are light on the uptrack (haven’t rode down yet). But I think any board with a set of sparks and new boots and you will be sitting pretty and enjoying life.

    Good luck and enjoy!

    #796164
    woodyak
    20 Posts

    Thanks for the great intel! I just checked and my old splitty does have Sparks on them but hey are pretty old. I do recall them not being the problem. I think it was my shitty skins and the heavy and unwieldy board.

    What do you think of this deal? http://denver.craigslist.org/spo/5822349890.html ? He says the skins are still in solid shape.

    #796179
    summersgone
    814 Posts

    What board did you have before? Most splitboards sit in the 7-8lb range today. A light carbon board gets mid 6 lb range. I would guess you’re old board isn’t that much heavier unless it was a early cambered venture, those were pigs. I just don’t want you to think it’s way different. this board I’d guess is in the 7lb range, maybe 7.5lbs. The new sparks are different in that they are lighter, better straps, and way more intuitive interface. I’m not sure the weight savings, but its likely a pound if I was to guess from the version before the blaze. If you are comparing the to blaze, weight savings isn’t very much, maybe a 1/4 pound. Just being realistic with you, the weight savings may not be crazy, 1-2 lbs off your feet best case. Maybe a pound. But this board will ride well with some sparks and won’t feel hardly different than a solid board (until you take it to the park).

    This is not a bad deal, basically 50-60% of new if he includes the pucks. I think this board would be great for the east coast if its your size. Lots of tree riding and a nimble board is key. I don’t know much about Jones, there has been some quality issues over the years on the first gens, but I think it been resolved, and people i’ve talked to like the ride characteristics, especially the hovercraft. The G3’s climb really well and grip steep tracks the best out there, but I personally think the glue blows chunks, and I don’t recommend them for that reason. Once they are contaminated it leaves residue on the base. So I would say if you could get them reglued with some Black Diamond glue (most shops around $50), your life will likely be better. They get the job done well enough if the glue isn’t f’d. Keep them away from heat and store with the cheat sheets. I’d probably also refill that base weld. Looks janky, or maybe done with ptex candle which will come out on your skins at some point. I’d probably also ditch those karakorum clips and go to voiles. The karakorums work, but voiles are way more simple and make transitions easier.

    #796207
    woodyak
    20 Posts

    It happens to be a Venture and it’s quite heavy. It’s also too big at 162. I picked it up pretty cheap several years ago. Got a backpack that was too big for me and skins that were all f’d up, as well as a bunch of older hardware that didn’t do anything. I think I still have all that stuff somewhere. Even with all that going on I did enjoy it the few times I did it. My kids are older now and I have buds now that do backcountry/sidecountry skiing so I should be able to get out more this year, as long as we get some freaking snow!

    I went ahead and bought the Jones from that guy. I like the idea of having a more powder riding board alongside my NS SL resort board. It’s been a great board but I’ve always wanted something better for the powder days in the trees.

    I’m going up to VT for Thanksgiving. I’m hoping there’s something with some snow. Even if it’s just groomers at Jay I’d like to give it a go. I think I’m going to start with the bindings that I have from the Venture just to get a feel for it.

    Thanks for chiming in with the advice. Happy Splitting!

    -Bill

    #796275
    Cascade Cruiser
    15 Posts

    Bill-

    I can relate…I grew up snowboarding but switched over to an AT ski setup for a few years because I liked the efficiency and simplicity of the tech ski bindings, but I’ve snow switched back to split boarding because I enjoy the downhill on the board so much more than on the skis.

    That’s great you picked up a set-up to get back into the splitting. I’m sure your gear “needs” will evolve as you get days/seasons on the mountain. I picked up a Prior BC split w/ Karakoram Prime bindings & G3 skins last spring to get me going. Just wearing Burton boots for now. I’ve been very happy w/ the setup, got out on Hood a few days last week.

    In the future I will may experiment w/ a hard boot setup if I can find something that is comfortable to ride and climb in…it would definitely save weight. Lots of expertise on the forum in that area. There are also a few soft boots with mountaineering soles out there.

    Will

    #796443
    woodyak
    20 Posts

    Thanks for the help guys. I went ahead and got that board. It’s in better shape than the Pic portrayed. I will plan on getting that repair better repaired in the future but it’s not that bad. The glue on the skins is also in great shape. I picked up the Spark Surge bindings w/heel lock and pucks and ordered the V clips as well. Overall the board feels pretty solid. The front definitely is a good bit more snug than the rear. The K clip up front takes more effort to lock in than the rear. If I try to pull it apart there is about a mm play in the end clip on the rear, with none upfront. Would the V clips be better, feel the same, be worse? Is it something to worry about?

    In any case, if it all works out I’ll be skinning up Jay this Wednesday on a fresh 12+!

    Cheers!

    #796446
    summersgone
    814 Posts

    Voile now makes a little spacer that you can spin to increase / decrease board tension on the clips. It should take care of most of that issue. Also, the Karakorums if you take them off you can bring the hooks closer together or apart be more consistent. Either will work, I just think Voile is a better way (simplicity, strength) than Karakorum.

    #796469
    woodyak
    20 Posts

    I just installed the clips last night. The spacers are a $5 add-on, but even without the clips it tightened the rear right up, plus they look dope! The clips did expose how loose my end clips are. It’s not terrible but there is some play with the pivots being pretty loose. I put some duct tape on there to help, but I was thinking I could use the mounting hardware from K clips to stiffen that up. Do you see any issues with that? Why do they use rivets anyway?

    #796473
    summersgone
    814 Posts

    I’m not sure I get what you mean. If you are talking tip/tail clips, I don’t get how or why you’d want to put on the K clips there. If you are concerned, buy some new voile clips and re-rivot them on. As long as they don’t pop off, it doesn’t really matter how loose they are. They are just there at the end to keep the nose together but don’t do much for board stability.

    #796474
    woodyak
    20 Posts

    I was thinking of using the bolts from the K-clips instead of the rivets on the existing tip/tail clips just to keep things stiffer but since it doesn’t affect stability I won’t mess with them for now. Maybe I’ll re-rivet next season.

    #796475
    Scooby2
    610 Posts

    enjoy the snow out there! The upside of rivets compared to a bolt, beyond the look of a bolt, is that if the screw portion extends up it’s easy to catch your skin attachment bar thing if you cross your tips while skinning. Also if the screw is exposed it will scratch up the base on the tips more than a rivet.

    Main point of tip clips for me is to keep little branches from wedging between in ride mode, and to hold the halves together nicely before sliding touring brackets on or around the house w/o bindings on.

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