Forums Splitboard Talk Forum "Split skiing" the traverse…
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  • #634669
    amkaplan
    77 Posts

    @surfsnowywaves wrote:

    Yes, I’ve seen that video. I’m amazed at what he does – like everyone else here. I’m nowhere near his splitski ability. However, it’s difficult to properly weight simply the toes of the back foot, and therefore you have really poor torsional control over your foot. It’s sort of just dangling there, and if you hook an edge, it’s bye-bye soft knee tissue. Is it possible to do? Yeah, sure. Definitely not what I’d do though, seeing that I’m currently couch-bound due to my second meniscus repair.

    I think “difficult” is an understatement – an invitation to spontaneous ACL tears is more like it. I don’t know that I’ll ever be able to get past face-plants. I’ve had a couple of meniscus repairs, too, so I’m a bit nervous about my knees with a board on each foot in general. Why no one has devised a heel clip, I don’t understand – at least that would give me a fighting chance. Jive told me he only does the turns in soft snow, but will sometimes do them “on long steep runs because it’s kinda fun.” Those are some cajones.

    #634670
    surfsnowywaves
    60 Posts

    @amkaplan wrote:

    I think “difficult” is an understatement – an invitation to spontaneous ACL tears is more like it. I don’t know that I’ll ever be able to get past face-plants. I’ve had a couple of meniscus repairs, too, so I’m a bit nervous about my knees with a board on each foot in general. Why no one has devised a heel clip, I don’t understand – at least that would give me a fighting chance. Jive told me he only does the turns in soft snow, but will sometimes do them “on long steep runs because it’s kinda fun.” Those are some cajones.

    I ain’t lookin to split-ski groomers! But yeah, with the proper technique of keeping the weight back just a little (it’s a fine-tuned leaning back/pulling up with your toes to sort of float the tips of your skis) it can be oddly fun! And makes exits a bit more bearable.

    As for heel clip, I think the idea has been raised before and tried – I’m pretty sure I’ve seen pics of someone with a full Dynafit binding on the skis, but I believe the issue tends to be that there’s not adequate space between the pucks to fit something in.

    #634671
    TravelingAce
    5 Posts

    Utah- You say ‘inner straight edge’ but I and everyone I’ve known, every video I’ve seen, the straight edge is on the outside. I’ve never tried skinning up with the inner edge the straight one.

    As far as skiing on the splity goes, I try and avoid it at all cost. Unfortunately, where I ride the exits are long and rolling, I struggle to keep up with my skiing friends or buddies who split ski out, but I can usually do it, unstrapping the back foot to push/hop sometimes, using the poles to push, jumping creeks that they have to de-board for and all around just working alot harder on the exits. I suck at skiing and would really hate to hurt my knee attempting to ski out of control on some of our sketchy exits. If I do switch to ski mode I leave the skins on for more control.

    #634672
    Scotty1974
    61 Posts

    I actually had a small epic on James Peak where I skied a couple miles through the trees in waste deep powder. Yes I know that sounds horrible, but like I said it was a bad epic and good lesson in why not to travel alone in the BC. I keep my skins on to slow me down and it was NOT graceful. Terrain was about 30 degrees of deep snow in slightly moderate trees, dropping into a drainage. Not being a skier I did some snowplowing and some side cutting to get down, so having my skins on help a little even though I was going against the grain.

    I got about 20 tours worth of splitting experience in one drop in.

    #634673
    KGN
    215 Posts

    I rode in the Duffey Lake area today, and for a change on my way out I rode the whole way out in board mode. Saved some time in spots, lost some in others. But it was nice to nice to avoid split skiing in a few areas. I basically used my poles and in certain areas, flicked open my back bindings with the pole handle and pushed through.

    On a side note, for the last 1/4 km I put my board on my back because I was too lazy to switch over, and it was hard packed anyways..Man, it sucks when your board is on your back. I was hitting trees, the trunk of my car when I opened it, my feet would sometimes hit my board on certain inclines. Bad memories brought back for sure.

    I also always skin out with my skins on, its just too scary without them on. And I stay off the skin track on the steeper areas, powder helps slow me down. Maybe some day there will be a split system that does both equally well.

    I am getting better though, and I feel when I switch to Spark bindings next season, that I will have much more control. There is a lot of play in the voile plates when leaning side to side.

    #634674
    DesoHoe
    9 Posts

    I was gonna comment on this post about a week ago and then got busy at work and had to come back to it. Am so glad I did, cause there’s so much more on here now. NIICE!
    Here it goes: I would highly recommend not split skiing. As efficient as it seems, the equipment- straight up- is not made for it. I’ve bent touring brackets and actually cracked my last splitty right under foot, and Im pretty sure its because of all the extra wear put on it from split skiing. (taking tele turns can ruin your touring brackets).
    That being said… if you simply cannot avoid it (which I understand, have been there too): put your heels down and your weight back. Take into account the flexibility of a snowboard boot vs a ski boot. After engaging a turn, the boards wont react for a few fractions of a second, so allow yourself a wide turning radius (this simply because the boots aren’t as stiff as they would be for skiing). Bend your knees, bend your elbows, dont lock out any of your joints, you’ll have way better balance if you stay relaxed (you’ll look cooler too). I think about turning from my ankles, that way I can kind of get an edge in, pointing me where I want to go.
    Have fun. Kick ass.

    #634675
    Powder_Rider
    498 Posts
    Quote:
    [/Here it goes: I would highly recommend not split skiing. As efficient as it seems, the equipment- straight up- is not made for it. I’ve bent touring brackets and actually cracked my last splitty right under foot, and Im pretty sure its because of all the extra wear put on it from split skiing. (taking tele turns can ruin your touring brackets).quote]

    If the above is true… I just want to mention that my Dynafit toe pieces and F1 Scarpa boots work incredibly well for split skiing. Please let’s NOT flame this thread with the Soft vs Hard boot argument here. Just saying Dynafits really work for skiing and you not have to be concerned about torquing the touring bracket or cracking the split-ski, because they will release.

    #634676
    jimw
    1420 Posts

    Hah. I remember the first thing I did when I got my first split like 7 or 8 years ago, was take it on the beginner lift in ski mode. I figured I’d get used to all the ins and outs of the board for a day at the resort before I headed off into the bc. I also figured that since I had alpine skied for years before snowboarding, and that since I had been also been out a few times on tele skis and been able to link rudimentary tele turns, well… how hard could it be?

    You know the rest of that story. 🙂

    Regarding the heel lock, this is something that I’ve wanted for the longest time, thinking that it would make the system a lot more skiable, and more like an alpine ski setup. Well last year I tried a little mod to do just that, based on an idea from Will. You can do this yourself if you have some empty inserts behind your back pucks, and have holes in your highback that you can run a strap through.

    I took this system to the resort and tested it out on the groomers, and later on a bc trip with one of those long flat exits where the skiers end up back at the car an hour before you do.

    The bottom line is, it didn’t work nearly as well as I thought it would. The actual heel hold-down is suprisingly good considering it’s just a Voile strap. There is a little bit of movement in the binding but not as much as you would think. The real problem is the lack of lateral support in soft boots. You just don’t have much control over the edges! You really have to overexaggerate knee movements to get the tiniest bit of edging. I also tried adding a power strap around the upper part of the highback and my lower leg, which helped a bit, but it was still a lot lamer than I thought it would be. I also tried swapping the board halves, and there really wasn’t much difference regardless of which side the straight edge was on. It pretty much just Still Sucked. Sorry. (but it was probably at least an incremental improvement…)

    Hate to say it, but I bet hard boots would work a lot better in this regard.

    #797231
    David Lombardi
    2 Posts

    Thats a nice heel hack jimw. Utilizing the extra inserts is a great method for this. What is connecting the inlet bolt to the voile strap? Some kind of webbing? This is an old thread and split specific bindings are all over the place but heel lock down hacks are still a great alternative to the expensive split specific bindings.

    #797643
    Scooby2
    610 Posts

    I dont live in such an area, but if I had several miles in and out on flats, I’d probably use xc skis with fishscales on them or kicker skins and blast out the flat work or rolling flats. Attach whatever bracket you use right to the xc ski. I’d just leave them where the skin track to riding began, switch back on exit. They are available for cheap and weightless compared to splits. Light feet cover the flats pretty well even with the board on your back.

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