Forums Splitboard Talk Forum Round two of the Splitboard Education Company
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  • #575453
    KR
    159 Posts

    Well, another winter is on its way, and the Splitboard Education Company is gearing up for round two. I’ve been working to establish more contacts within this field, and am excited about the response and feedback that I’m getting. The website is ever-evolving, and continually being refined. (I’m just learning about SEO stuff, keywords, etc. :scratch: )

    Check it out: http://www.splitboardeducationcompany.com

    Ultimately, my goal is to provide education and instruction for snowboarders looking to get into this game. Too often, one’s first introduction to splitboards comes via a ski guide who doesn’t necessarily understand all the nuances when it comes to splitboarding. Getting all the small things dialed just gives all of us a better name. How often have you been on a tour and witnessed a splitboarder struggling on the changeover? This doesn’t have to be the case. Thorough and proper education beforehand can solve this.

    I’d love to hear thoughts from the community on sb.com, and any feedback from you all is valued and worth more than what outsider web-people can tell me.

    Also, I just got some photos of the SHOP by Tobias MacPhee (http://www.tobiasmacphee.com). I’ll post those when he gets them to me. It’s a cool space, and there is an open invitation for anyone to come by, check it out, look at maps, wax your board, or talk SHOP.

    (BTW, S.H.O.P. stands for Sec Home Office Place. :doobie: :mrgreen: )

    Stop by if you’re in the SLC, check out the website, and share some feedback. I’d love to hear it!

    Peace! Cheers! :drinks:

    #645498
    jolson05
    22 Posts

    ^ +1 for SEC!!!

    Looking forward to this season’s first SEC field clinic. Exactly what a seasoned snowboarder with little to no back country experience needs.

    #645499
    stoudema
    551 Posts

    The site looks nice Kelly! This looks like a pretty cool thing for folks looking to get into the game and would have been nice for when I was first learning about splits. One area I imagine a lot of interst would center around would be Avy education combined with splitting (i.e. an intro splitting course combined with a level 1 avalanche cert.). Hope it works out well for ya’! If I’m ever down that way I’ll look you up!

    Matt

    #645500
    KR
    159 Posts

    @jolson05 wrote:

    Looking forward to this season’s first SEC field clinic. Exactly what a seasoned snowboarder with little to no back country experience needs.

    I can’t wait for snow to hold a clinic!!! Hope to see you there, Jeremy!

    @stoudema wrote:

    One area I imagine a lot of interst would center around would be Avy education combined with splitting (i.e. an intro splitting course combined with a level 1 avalanche cert.).

    I agree, Matt… avalanche education targeted towards splitboarders. It’s not a huge difference, but I think it means something to learn stuff from someone on the same equipment, with others on the same equipment.

    This year, SEC is offering an Avalanche Awareness certificate, jointly issued with Utah Mountain Adventures (who have been in the avalanche ed. game for a long time), following curriculum guidelines from the American Avalanche Association.

    Thanks for the feedback, Matt! Look me up if you make a trip out to Utah this winter, and I’ll do the same the next time I bring my split to Oregon. Cheers!

    #645501
    jcbackcountry
    47 Posts

    Really just any avy education is very important. Lord knows my first few trips in the backcountry, while not overly risky were without the full toolset to properly interpret avalanche conditions and all the warning signs.

    After doing some education I definitely acknowledge some decisions I would have done differently my first few times splitboarding the backcountry.

    Again, there was no incident, but I consider myself lucky, ignorance may be bliss but it is far more important to understand the situations you are putting yourself in and making appropriate decisions based on your observations, as opposed to reading the area avy forecast and then winging it.

    Having the gear (splitboard, snowshoes and avy equipment) does NOT mean you can safely recreate in avalanche terrain! This is where I think you’re education options are important but the message needs to be not to travel until you’re trained and practiced. Snowmobilers could also do much better with this!

    #645502
    KR
    159 Posts

    Here’s recent photos of the S.H.O.P. from my buddy Tobias (http://www.tobiasmacphee.com). This is where the magic happens at SEC. :mrgreen:

    Stop by for a visit if you’re in the SLC.

    Cheers!

    Area for maps, books, paperwork, etc…

    …with some room for a tuning bench and storage…

    …and another wing for workshops with splitboards.

    #645503
    Scooby2
    613 Posts

    for minute there I was thinking “how on earth did you get a special use permit in the Wasatch-Cache?” Now I get it, Best of luck, resist indoor jobs at all costs!

    #645504
    KR
    159 Posts

    @scooby2 wrote:

    for minute there I was thinking “how on earth did you get a special use permit in the Wasatch-Cache?” Now I get it, Best of luck, resist indoor jobs at all costs!

    Thanks, and this is mostly to feed my habit for organizing gear and splitboarding a lot… but if it ever turned into anything permanent, that’d be great!

    Stop by if you’re in the SLC, Peace!!

    #645505
    KR
    159 Posts

    @jcbackcountry wrote:

    Really just any avy education is very important. Lord knows my first few trips in the backcountry, while not overly risky were without the full toolset to properly interpret avalanche conditions and all the warning signs.

    Like all of us…
    @jcbackcountry wrote:

    After doing some education I definitely acknowledge some decisions I would have done differently my first few times splitboarding the backcountry.

    Me too…
    @jcbackcountry wrote:

    Again, there was no incident, but I consider myself lucky, ignorance may be bliss but it is far more important to understand the situations you are putting yourself in and making appropriate decisions based on your observations, as opposed to reading the area avy forecast and then winging it.

    Done that…

    @jcbackcountry wrote:

    Having the gear (splitboard, snowshoes and avy equipment) does NOT mean you can safely recreate in avalanche terrain! This is where I think you’re education options are important but the message needs to be not to travel until you’re trained and practiced.

    I don’t think we could have said it any better that this… thanks for the argument, jcbackcountry!

    #645506
    kranger
    7 Posts

    Kelly-
    Just reviewing the forum and saw your SEC page…nice work, and best of luck. I went to PRT at U of U with you and your sister. In fact, I ran into her at a Halloween Party last week in Bend. Again nice work, and glad to see your still in the game. Give me a shout if your in Central Oregon and we can go for a tour. Later, Kirk

    #645507
    KR
    159 Posts

    @kranger wrote:

    Kelly-
    Just reviewing the forum and saw your SEC page…nice work, and best of luck. I went to PRT at U of U with you and your sister. In fact, I ran into her at a Halloween Party last week in Bend. Again nice work, and glad to see your still in the game. Give me a shout if your in Central Oregon and we can go for a tour. Later, Kirk

    Thanks for the kind words! (I’m not surprised you ran into my sister at a Halloween party… she likes wearing costumes, holiday or not.)

    I should be in Bend later in the winter, and I’ll definitely be in touch with you all when I come out. What’s your last name Kirk? Just trying to ring a bell…

    For all you peeps still reading this thread, the latest with SEC is trying to dial in the website/logo, to sort of ‘brand’ my image. Not sure what I think about that, but everyone is saying that’s what you gotta do if you want to survive.

    Mostly, I just want to go splitboarding. :clap:

    #645508
    fitit
    343 Posts

    I hope it turns out well especially with so many people entering the backcountry for the first time. Your prices seem pretty reasonable and hopefully appeal to even college students anxious to get into the BC. Seems like it is mostly for locals, but will you be putting on any events to bring some out of towners your way?

    #645509
    KR
    159 Posts

    @fitit wrote:

    I hope it turns out well especially with so many people entering the backcountry for the first time. Your prices seem pretty reasonable and hopefully appeal to even college students anxious to get into the BC. Seems like it is mostly for locals, but will you be putting on any events to bring some out of towners your way?

    Thanks for your thoughts. Things are super busy at the moment, ramping up for the season, and excited for some forecasted snow in the Wasatch!

    Right now, class and field clinics are arranged on a custom basis for anyone, locals or out-of-town. SEC will conduct classes in our office/SHOP area, or will come to other locations in the Salt Lake valley. Field clinics happen here in the Wasatch. So far, we’ve taught locals and people from out of town.

    I do like the idea of planning some specific events to attract people from all over. I’m open to ideas, and I’ll continue thinking about this.

    Keep the ideas coming! Peace.

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