Forums Trip Reports Pump House Basin (Berthoud Pass)
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  • #576786

    Hey guys, skied the SE aspect of the bowl, mountains right, of No Name peak. Snow got soft, but not as soft as predicted. Not too sloppy, skins held. We didn’t do any compression tests, though no noticeable layering with probe testing. North face stayed pretty firm. Did not notice any slides, or red flags. I’d stay clear of the cornice though, it is starting to drip. We started the trip around noon, and reached the summit around 2:30 or 3:00. It was long sleeve weather. Have fun. Be safe.

    #654923
    PedroDelfuego
    758 Posts

    Glad you had a good day up there! Keep up the stoke.

    Without trying to sound like a jerk, I would really recommend you guys start earlier. Being up there at around 2-3pm is really putting yourself in the “danger zone” as far as the warmest time of the day. Berthoud can warm up quickly and you dont want to be exposed at the warmest point in the day. Right now your biggest danger will be wet slide activity and its not to be taken lightly. My partner and I were caught twice last year late in the day by wet slides at Bert.

    PS: Those cornices dripping is a “red flag”. They are literally as big a semi trailer and are no joke if they come down.

    #654924

    Thanks, all good advice. And i agree with your advice. We payed very close attention to the snow conditions through out the hike, and didn’t even expect to make it to the bowl. But to snow never got as soft as expected. The cornice dripping is definitely a red flag, though the drips looked not too recent. and we stayed out of its debris path. And when crossing under it we went one at a time. We used correct caution. But you are right, if the snow was any sloppier we would have turned around. We hit it just as our window of opportunity was closing. It was actually perfect for skiing the SE aspect cuz the N was still pretty hard. We were out the day before and had a CT 26 Q 2 for a six foot compression test on a NE aspect at about 11,000′. The slab broke at about 5 feet. Exactly what the CAIC predicted. So we kept an eye on those deep slabs too. I’m glad you guys made it out of those slide safely.

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