Forums Splitboard Talk Forum New and confused!
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  • #811227
    Nesha
    5 Posts

    Hi.

    I am wondering about split board sizing. I am 5’11 weigh approx. 150 lb. I have been told that the woman’s specific boards are preferable however it seems that popular brands (Jones etc.) only make a board up to 156…. I don’t really want to be sinking too much and think that a 156 board is too short… am I wrong?

    Honestly any insight would be brilliant! Thanks!

    #811231
    thejeffloop
    6 Posts

    At 150lbs you will be fine on a 156.

    #811234
    permnation
    302 Posts

    I think 156 is too short and would stick to the tried and true chin to nose area for board length. I am 5’11” and @ least a bag of sand heavier, and a 160 splitboard is my shortest ridden. It’s really fun but I do not rely on it for float in powder. When you add your clothing and backpack weight plus your height, I think you will want a freeride-style board around 160 to maintain float in slower sections and be capable of handling steeper sections.

    #811238
    buell
    532 Posts

    It depends on the type of board, the terrain, and the snow conditions you generally ride in. On west coast snow, you can generally ride a smaller board than in the intermountain west. It also depends on if you are discussing a short / wide design or a more traditional freeride board.

    I am 5’9, 145 pounds and typically ride a 158 freeride board on the west coast. I do have a more floaty powder board for deep days. When I spent winters in Utah, I rode 160 and 166 powder boards.

    Women’s boards are usually narrower, softer, and shorter than men’s boards. My wife is 5’4, 125 and rarely rides the women’s version of a board, typically she is on the smallest men’s version. The board does not know if you are male or female, it only knows how you ride.

    #811239
    Nesha
    5 Posts

    That was super helpful thank you. I was thinking a 158 mens board would be ideal. I was told to go a little on the shorter side for control (rather than ride a 160).

    #811270
    downthemtn
    17 Posts

    You also have to think about what you will have on yourself, as that also adds weight which affects board sizing. A 160 would be the max and a 156 a minimum depending on your goals.

    #811295
    Scooby2
    594 Posts

    I second what Buell said, shorter boards are fine for denser coastal snow, Deeper and drier Wasatch type and BC snow you’ll need width. I have two girls in my family with size 9 and 10 womens who both ride men’s boards because 24.5 cm doesn’t cut it for Women’s 9 and 10 for width, especially in Utah. Make sure you have ample width first. At 5’11” you have plenty of leverage for a board in the low 160s. Don’t fear a 165 if you are in Utah or interior BC or see a lot of great quality deep snow.

    #811298
    Nesha
    5 Posts

    Thanks, I am thinking a Prior Khyber 156 or Jones Solution 156-158. Because I am newer I was thinking shorter end of things for the maneuverability and weight for going up. Would a Prior Khyber be too much for coastal snow?

    #811300
    buell
    532 Posts

    I rode a 160 Khyber as my primary board in Utah and really liked it (more float in Utah snow and almost always riding good powder). When I started spending winters in the Eastern Sierra, I found it was not very good in the wind affected snow / mixed conditions that you often get even on a powder day. It just did not like variable conditions. It could make a good powder day board when you know that is all you will be riding.

    I rode a 158 Solution for a bit and now ride a 158 Milligram on the west coast. For the west coast, make sure your board can handle any condition first. Then add a powder board for the deep days.

    #811306
    96avs01
    874 Posts

    @buell great advice!

    165 Venture Divide/Spark Frankenburners/La Sportiva Spantiks
    163W Jones Solution/Phantom Alphas/Dynafit TLT5s
    162 Furberg

    Chris

    #811435
    NatasKaput
    40 Posts

    i’m 6ft 200lbs and float all day on a 156 Jones Hovercraft

    My love head wound and your free head wound
    Don't know but I even wanna try to be

    #811504
    buell
    532 Posts

    i’m 6ft 200lbs and float all day on a 156 Jones Hovercraft

    That is impressive. It depends on the snow, but the 156 Hovercraft is just right to float me all day at 145 pounds.

    A few years ago I had a 166 Prior Spearhead for Utah powder and also picked up a 156 Hovercraft. They actually have very similar surface area and surface area distribution. The Hover craft just didn’t have the 10 cm long tail that was on the Spearhead.

    #811719
    Mike
    14 Posts

    FWIW: I’m the same height (5’11”), similar weight (~155) and ride a 162cm Jones (mostly in interior BC).

    I’d second the point about gear adding to your weight. Might be worth doing a back-of-the-envelope calculation just to see how much it can be.

    #811758
    summersgone
    813 Posts

    If I was you I’d stick in the 158-162 range depending on types of snow you ride primarily. Soft pow, go larger, firmer, go shorter.

    For extra weight on the skin track, plan 10-18 pounds heavier than resort riding depending on your gear. My typical day is around 14 pounds with a liter of water.

    I’m 5′ 7″, 155 dry weight, and I typically ride 160-162 split boards. Length doesn’t tell all the story though, surface area and profile are bigger drivers. A wider 155 board may float better then a skinnier 163 board. My 160 Neversummer Prospector rides a whole lot smaller in pow than my 162 furberg. I literally can’t sink the Furberg when its deep. I rode 156 on the resort, and have a 160 now (because I only ride pow). I’m in Colorado with softer snow, and I don’t like wallowing. I also have 0 issues maneuvering a bigger board, but on firmer days will take the 160 out if I know its going to be more technical riding.

    #811760
    Snurfer
    1438 Posts

    Don’t forget slope angles. Consider that typically after a big snow the avy danger rises and by extension its prudent to ride lower angle terrain. The problem is a lot of new unsettled snow on low angle terrain can result in a miserable day of skooching along in a trench. I tend to ride larger boards and I still experience this a couple times per season. On the other hand if you only ride steeps or compacted snow, I don’t believe length or surface area makes much difference in the ability to happily descend a slope.

    Above all, have a great first season

    Cheers!

    @topodojo IG
    Shark Snowsurf Chuna
    Voile V-Tail 170 BC
    Voile One Ninety Five
    Spark R&D Arc

    #812441
    NatasKaput
    40 Posts

    i’m 6ft 200lbs and float all day on a 156 Jones Hovercraft

    That is impressive. It depends on the snow, but the 156 Hovercraft is just right to float me all day at 145 pounds.

    A few years ago I had a 166 Prior Spearhead for Utah powder and also picked up a 156 Hovercraft. They actually have very similar surface area and surface area distribution. The Hover craft just didn’t have the 10 cm long tail that was on the Spearhead.

    i ride a lot of low angle deep soft pow, all the spots nobody can get in and out of, that softer nose of the Hovercraft is real easy to pump and pop above the snow surface

    My love head wound and your free head wound
    Don't know but I even wanna try to be

    #812491
    Scooby2
    594 Posts

    NK,
    I’m guessing you have size 11 feet or so, if that is the case and you ride a lot of low angle pow, there is still a real and discernible amount of float and speed you could add from riding a wider board. There aren’t a lot of larger and wider Hovercraft type splits out there though.

    I’m 6’1. 190 something usually. Years ago I switched from a 26 to a 27.5 width and the difference in low angle speed through turns was very noticeable. I ride a 187 x 27.5 which with the tail cut would be like a 175-177 in the hovercraft format probably. In some snow conditions, a board like that can feel nimble and make turns when other riders are just trying to stay going.

    I’m done with board making for the year, but if you are interested in a custom next year keep me in mind. I have an excellent formula for low angle, good snow, tree riding boards.

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