Forums DIY and Mods How well can this wood be waterproof sealed? (Dragonplate Carbon Fiber Birch Cor
Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
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  • #782107
    Mr_Orange
    76 Posts

    I’m mocking up some parts for a snowboard binding prototype.

    Interested in using this Dragonplate Carbon Fiber Birch Core material because it’s suppose to be lighter and stronger than even the solid carbon fiber plates they sell.

    This right here: http://dragonplate.com/ecart/categories.asp?cID=3

    Here’s a strength/weight test video compared to normal carbon fiber: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TSrK_ZCoZJA

    My only concern is how the exposed wood along the edges will react to constant exposure to snow/water.

    Can i just seal up the exposed wood edges the same DIY splitboard inner edges are sealed up after they are first cut?

    I have no experience with waterproofing wood. Not sure if birch wood needs special attention or not. Not sure if even after you seal it, will there be a chance small amounts of water can still seep through. Not sure if the ‘seal’ layer actually just creates a barrier or if it actually impregnates the wood itself to make it waterproof. Would it carbon fiber next to it have adverse effects to the sealant?

    Any feedback would be appreciated.

    #782186
    Scooby2
    611 Posts

    Short answer: really well. I’ve been through this issue quite a bit. Wood sealing and epoxy are probably thought about the most in the boat building/boat repair circles. Conventional thought seems to be that the farther the epoxy penetrates into wood, the more waterproof it is. This leads to products like CPES -clear penetrating epoxy sealer: http://www.smithandcompany.org/CPES/ There are some good videos that show how much farther this product goes through different types of wood. By having a high amount of solvents in it, it is pretty noxious to work with and kind of lame having a can of it around forever when you need less than an ounce. This is a runny epoxy with solvents in it to make it penetrate deep into the wood fiber before it hardens, creating a thicker area that is sealed.

    However, I ‘ve also read a convincing study that epoxies that do not go as far into the wood are equally effective barriers against water. So the difference would be that the more penetrating sealer might not be compromised when you get a good sized nick in the wood, that might go through the sealed layer of wood. Birch is pretty hard, so I would not expect it to get a real deep nick, especially in a 3/16 layer with carbon fiber layers above and below.

    I’d use a low viscosity (runny) epoxy resin with a uv stabilizer in it. I would also warm the parts to be sealed to about 90-110F and have your epoxy warmed to around 90 or a little more which will let it flow into the wood pretty well. I recommend resin research brand, it has a good UV blocker so doesn’t go yellow, and is supposed to have less of the ingredients that can cause sensitivity to epoxy. you can get it here: http://www.foamez.com/ez-epoxy-6oz-kit-p-645.html or from resin research directly. You can also use this epoxy for fixing anything, it hardens up in 30-60 minutes, so the rest doesn’t go to waste.

    Heat-cured epoxies for laminating snowboards are definitely harder when cured, but I think it is overkill for sealing snowboard edges or little parts like you are doing and it might cost a bit to add a UV stabilizer to these resins.

    #782187
    Mr_Orange
    76 Posts

    Does the Resin research brand epoxy have some flex to it when hardened? The basic home depot epoxies I’ve used before seem to get really hard. I’ve always thought epoxy would crack like glass.

    I was sure raw wood could be sealed like in the case of boats and all. Just wasn’t sure if the carbon + wood lamination changes things or if it might even be already impregnated with epoxy.

    Thanks for all the good info. I’ll try out those recommendations.

    RIght now I’m just working on this binding but I’ve got plans to make my own carbon board in the future so this’ll come in handy.

    #782189
    Scooby2
    611 Posts

    epoxy is made with different characteristics. It definitely is not brittle, some are more flexible, some are more stiff, flex isn’t an issue for a sealing a thin layer of wood. The term is elastic modulus, you can see that in the descriptions of different epoxies. Think of it as an adhesive, not as something strong in itself. ski.builders.com has become the definitive resource for boardbuilding, there’s nothing that isn’t covered there. I wish it was up and going when I started.

    #782195
    Mr_Orange
    76 Posts

    Nice, I’m all set.

    Have you built a board yourself? I wonder if those diy boards can perform every bit as good as purchased ones.

    #782500
    Scooby2
    611 Posts

    Yep. I made my first board in 1997 and I haven’t made a board yet where I would prefer to ride a manufactured board and they are all still holding together strong. They do cost a lot more in money and time though-at least for the first few seasons.

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