Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
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  • #779760
    Kahti Ryan
    48 Posts

    So I think the time has come to replace my old Bern helmet.

    Looking for recommendations on what to look for (fit will be the ultimate deciding factor of course)

    Ideally I would like something I can use for both splitboarding and winter climbing. There seems to be a few dual certified helmets available now – Camp Pulse, Mammut Alpine Rider, Scott Couloir, Sweet Protection Igniter Alpiniste, Cebe Trilogy, Salewa Xenon – but limited info and reviews on them. Anyone have experience?
    It seems to me a helmet designed for riding should be able to take impacts from falling rocks and ice anyway, without the climbing cert. But the additional ventilation, light weight and headtorch compatibility of the above helmets looks good. A helmet you could wear comfortably on the up and down would be great, and I tend to wear a balclava hooded fleece under my helmet anyway, so warmth isn’t a big priority.

    The other interesting tech i’ve seen recently is MIPS. What are peoples opinions? Not many choices right now, and annoyingly Sweet offer either the igniter alpiniste with headtorch strap and more durable shell OR a mips version, but not one combing both.

    So what’s on your noggin?

    #779767
    HansGLudwig
    601 Posts

    I’m not a brain trauma guy or helmet engineer, but as I understand it, vis-a-vis impacts the traditional solutions to the needs of a climbing helmet are wholly at odds with traditional solutions to the needs of a ski/board/bike helmet. Therefore offerings are going to be slim to begin with.
    It looks like a good list you have started there.

    FWIW, I have an old RED anon/burton helmet which I don’t use for climbing (but doubles as a bike/skate helm).

    Be sure to bookmark Splitboard.com's Recent Activity page...
    http://splitboard.com/activity-2/

    #779769
    96avs01
    875 Posts

    I found the Camp helmets to run narrow, and didn’t fit my melon comfortably. Thought Dynafit offered a dual-rated helmet as well, but perhaps its been discontinued.

    I grabbed the Mammut Alpine Rider last year. So far I’m happy with it, but I’ve only used it a couple of times.

    165 Venture Divide/Spark Frankenburners/La Sportiva Spantiks
    163W Jones Solution/Phantom Alphas/Dynafit TLT5s
    162 Furberg

    Chris

    #779775
    Kahti Ryan
    48 Posts

    yup your right 96avs01 dynafit do make a dual cert as well – the radical helmet. It looks pretty geared to lightweight skimo racing though, seems like weight before safety or durability. also that visor is huge! But check out their daymaker helmet – built in spec-ops-night-vision style 1000 lumen headlamp! we now have quiver helmets!

    I also just remembered the kong kosmos, which I think actually beat Camp on their claim to world’s first dual cert helmet. Just not in the States. Again don’t know much about it.

    How is the fit on the alpine rider? It looks like it would sit high like a climbing helmet, making for some serious gaper gap and not as much side and back of head protection as a standard helmet?

    Hans – surely the design of climbing helmets is for impact and penetration protection, the same as built into snowboards to protect from tree branches or rocks, only with climbing it’s often the offending object moving rather than yourself? I know a lot of new climbing helmets are foam only, one hit and you retire it designs though. I wouldn’t think about wearing my climbing helmet riding, but I thought it could work the other way? I would like to have a helmet I can climb a couloir in, knowing if the lead climber knocks a rock or chunk of ice on me the helmet will suck it up, but also be able to wear that same helmet for riding the couloir afterwards. For serious climbs I would probably still wear my dedicated climbing helmet, as it’s lighter and cheaper to replace in the event of something falling on it, which would be more likely on a mixed route.

    #779783
    maniacdave
    564 Posts

    Don’t care about dual cert, but do care about lightweight, packable (and fucking available to try on or I’m buying it from the internet…) inmold helmets. So 2nded if anyone can chime in regarding the Mammut Alpine Rider or K2 Route.

    The way I see it, traditional climbing helmets are merely hardhats designed to shed only overhead blows but in an alpine environment rather than construction. Some run side impact protection, the newer inmold dual cert ones definietly do. If it’s inmold (regardless of sport/cert) all it takes is one significant exterior impact to retire it (what constitutes significant….?) If it’s a more traditional hardshell/foamlined helmet (again regardless of sport) multiple exterior impacts are A-OK (at the cost of weight, size, breathability, etc…). Both IMO though only get one shot at a heavy duty fall, impact, etc… where they did their job protecting my dome (so not treebranches & shit….).

    That was Pontus

    #779810
    Jason4
    443 Posts

    Like most of my gear my helmets have been quivering lately. I have a classic Petzl Ecrin Roc helmet that I use to sit on while I’m cragging and mostly for extra weight on training hikes, a newer Smith Maze helmet that is my everyday snowboard helmet and over the summer I got a Black Diamond Vapor for my birthday. I’ve haven’t had the BD helmet out for split trippin’ but I have had the other two up high.

    The Smith helmet won’t hold a headlamp to save my life, I’ve considered putting a velcro patch on the helmet and a mating patch on my lamp but no point if I can grab a climbing helmet instead. For most of my basic winter split trips this is still my go to helmet though, my goggles fit well, the venting is nice, the earflaps are nice, and I don’t usually plan to need a headlamp in helmet terrain for short tours. One of my favorite things about this helmet is how light it is. I don’t notice any weight on my head or in my pack but you give up some of the normal creature comforts for such weight savings.

    The old Petzl helmet was purchased cheap from a climbing club and still gets used as a beater at the crags and as a loaner for friends that don’t have climbing helmets. It’s heavy but other than that I kind of like the versatility and durability of it. Goggles don’t fit well but the ventilation is good since it’s suspended on straps instead of encapsulating your head in foam.

    The BD helmet is my current favorite. It silly light, even compared to the Smith helmet. I haven’t used it for snowboarding yet but I’ve checked the fit with goggles and there wasn’t much of a gap if any. It’ll hold a headlamp, all of the ventilation is at the back of the helmet which is a bummer but it goes with the protection requirements of a climbing helmet. It seems reasonably durable based on what I’ve put it through already with a bit of alpine rock climbing. My GF actually borrowed it to go climb Baker today because she likes it better than her helmet.

    One of the challenges of a climbing helmet is that they are supposed to protect from rock fall when you’re looking up a steep wall/face and so they have limits on venting on the front half of the shell. They seem to give up some protection on the back of the head where it seems like catching a heelside edge would result in the head impact.

    #779915
    96avs01
    875 Posts

    @kahti-ryan Fit is good, definitely wider than the Camp helmets. It has a size adjustment dial, so easy/quick to adjust if you need to add a beanie for warmth. It has a removable fabric liner that is attached to the ear pads. I personally use mine without the liner/ear pads as then it is essentially the same dimensions as a climbing helmet. The goggle and headlamp retaining clips are easy to operate while wearing gloves. Very satisfied with it thus far.

    165 Venture Divide/Spark Frankenburners/La Sportiva Spantiks
    163W Jones Solution/Phantom Alphas/Dynafit TLT5s
    162 Furberg

    Chris

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