Forums Splitboard Talk Forum Furberg Twin for freestyle/jib
Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
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  • #800273
    runard
    12 Posts

    Hi!
    I have been stalking these forums for a while and have a ” beginner-ish” question for you all. I ask it here as I have gotten good responses earlier and this is one of the few places where people seems to know the Furberg line of snowboards.

    I have been snowboarding on and off for a long time, but never really gotten good. Always stayed hovering between beginner and intermediate. In other words I ride ok, but chicken out and loose my confidence at high speeds, jumps and switch riding. I was fine with this for a long time. But after a couple of years with sporadic trips with my Burton Costume X and snowshoes to get the surf on the mountain, I was ready for a splitboard. Been riding the Furberg Split 1.0 for a couple of years and am loving it. But I realized that to get even more out of my time in the mountains I need to get jumps, switch and playfulness down.

    So I got a Furberg Twin as I had been so pleased with my split board. But I am having a real hard time with butters and ollies. Trying to get more playful on my board, but I dial the speed down as I am kind of chicken still. I read a couple of reviews on the Furberg twin stating that it is not the most fun at slow speeds.

    So, should I change out my Furberg Twin for another board that is more geared towards park to get help with the ollies, jumps and butters at slow speed? Or is it flexible enough that I should just stay focused and keep trying?

    PS: sorry for my bad english

    #800291
    HansGLudwig
    601 Posts

    Yes there are boards which make it easier to do particular tricks: ollies like the pop of camber, butters like full rocker. The Twin has a little help for both and at the same time it’s camber makes it harder to butter and it’s rocker makes it harder to ollie. However, if you learn to do both with your board, you’ll be able to do both on any board.

    I am of the mind, if you want to improve downhill skills— steeps, tricks, etc. . . — you need to go to a resort. A monster 14 hr, 10,000 ft (3,000 m) day is just a morning with a detachable quad. . . and some resorts offer lessons too.

    I am not saying you can’t improve downhill skills in the backcountry, it’s just not the best place for it. It’s harder and when you get injured, no one is there to help you. The backcountry is a place for a particular experience with skills you do well.
    *My 2¢*

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    #800304
    runard
    12 Posts

    Thanks for the reply Hans!

    Hmm, then I guess I should look for another board to get help with learning new stuff.

    I spend too much time in the resort and have a couple of weeks to do my backcountry trips. But they are the main focus. All my riding in the resort is just to be able to be a better backcountry rider. And my reasoning is that the more verse tail I am, the better I will be able to handle the backcountry and get more out of my limited time there. And I would never let that lower the security. I have spent a lot of time in the mountains doing other activities, but now the time has come to become a better rider as well.

    #800452
    permnation
    302 Posts

    The backcountry is a place for a particular experience with skills you do well.

    I like this sentence.

    @runard Like Hans stated, skills are acquired through resort days and pounding out laps. One can get their overall skill level to intermediate-expert pretty quick. I don’t butter and only use switch for going backwards, but I do like the Twin for all-around resort riding. It can hold it’s own in all conditions.

    #800468
    runard
    12 Posts

    The backcountry is a place for a particular experience with skills you do well.

    I like this sentence.

    @runard Like Hans stated, skills are acquired through resort days and pounding out laps. One can get their overall skill level to intermediate-expert pretty quick. I don’t butter and only use switch for going backwards, but I do like the Twin for all-around resort riding. It can hold it’s own in all conditions.

    I do agree. Both on the specific backcountry skill set and the experience of it. Backcountry is the reasons I haven’t given up on snowboarding. And I agree that the Furberg is very good in all conditions. I love how stable and smooth it feels.

    But I guess I don’t agree on the intermediate-expert fairly quickly part. At least that is where I struggle, and the original question was based on the assumption that I would become a better rider with a more divers skill set of the basic skills. Like more confidence by getting air control, better balance by learning butters and ollies, more edge control and speed by riding park terrain. But how easy is it to learn these things on a Furberg? @hansgludwig stated that it is possible, but I read between the lines that a softer board would make it much easier to develop the skill. But it is not impossible. I am just trying to figure out how to improve and be more playful in the resort on the days when I can’t run fast laps and to find out if I should invest in another board.

    #800552
    summersgone
    813 Posts

    I wouldn’t invest in a different splitboard. If you want to get better, buy a solid all mountain board, and ride the resort, there is no need for a splitboard. Any all mountain or park board that tickles your fancy out there probably works to accomplish this. A splitboard is going typically to be stiffer, regardless what it is. They don’t make too many splitboards to butter, they typically make them to freeride, and a lot of them have a lot more weight than a solid anyway making it harder to learn tricks. But I would keep the twin, its a good board and matches what you want to do. I think your skills should improve with some solid time on the resort. And then you can take that back to the twin and do well once your skills are better.

    I also completely agree with Hans. I always tell people when you give up on resort riding and only splitboard, you will generally not get any better at riding after that. So if you are a beginner/intermediate now, you will stay at that level, or it will take 10x longer to get to expert if you go full splitboard. You simply cannot get the laps in the backcountry as you can at the resort to build those skills. At a resort, I would expect if you committed (send that shit!) you could be riding expert level in a year or so. Also, maybe lessons is a good idea if you aren’t picking up the skills to get to the next level.

    #800631
    runard
    12 Posts

    Thanks!
    Not looking for a new split, as I am very pleased with the one I got. But from what you guys are saying I am gonna get myself a more playful solid and see if I can’t improve my technique on that one. Got it confirmed yesterday when I switched board with a friend. He had a much shorter park board. I could easily whip it around and play more with it. And when we switched back I could do the same on the Furberg twin. I just had to know what I wanted to do as there was no respons in the board telling me I was on the right track.

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