Forums Splitboards Furberg Snowboards
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  • #643175
    62daveUK
    13 Posts

    Hey guys just ridden my Freeride 167 for a few days in the French Alps. Well what a board – totally different to what I was expecting. I thought I was getting a pow smashing tanker that didn’t want to turn but fast turns were fine even on firmer snow. Float was off course great thanks to the length, taper and big nose rocker.

    Nothing particularity new in the above from what others have said but I thought another positive opinion was worth sharing!

    I’m not riding again this season unfortunately so I’m going to sell on this solid to make way for a 173 split next season. If anyone is interested in the 167 drop me a PM.

    #643176
    runard
    13 Posts

    Hi.
    I’m having a hard time getting comfortable on the split 73. On prepped snow it feels unstable and soft. When I lay it flat it sort of starts drifting. And with lots of pow between tight trees the turning is really hard. Especially the toe turn is a struggle. I’m a beginner/intermediat who have just learnt carving.

    Any tips on how I can tame this board?

    #643177
    Taylor
    792 Posts

    @runard wrote:

    Hi.
    I’m having a hard time getting comfortable on the split 73. On prepped snow it feels unstable and soft. When I lay it flat it sort of starts drifting. And with lots of pow between tight trees the turning is really hard. Especially the toe turn is a struggle. I’m a beginner/intermediat who have just learnt carving.

    Any tips on how I can tame this board?

    Practice. The only way to get good at turning is practice. Good instruction helps too, as does riding with and watching riders who turn well. But in the end it’s practice.

    Long radius sidecut boards are especially nice for slarving–non-carved or railed turns. You say you just learned carving–I assume that means railing (the entire edge passing through one point in the snow)… You might try practicing your slarves if you’re trying to carve it.

    If I were you I’d also spend some time in soft snow in off piste open terrain–terrain for which the board was designed and that affords you the space to feel out the board and your turns without having to worry about hitting trees.

    All splits ride drifty on a flat base on groomed snow–or so is my experience. That’s not a problem endemic to the Furburg.

    @sun_rocket

    #643178
    permnation
    303 Posts

    Like I heard from the lift today, “Just point it and go BONZAI!”

    Taylor, There really needs to be a high 170’s and a mid 180’s added to the furberg lineup. I was totally under-gunned today…190 would have been good, shit was deep.

    #643179
    Taylor
    792 Posts

    @permnation wrote:

    Like I heard from the lift today, “Just point it and go BONZAI!”

    Taylor, There really needs to be a high 170’s and a mid 180’s added to the furberg lineup. I was totally under-gunned today…190 would have been good, shit was deep.

    Yup. Getting under-gunned sucks. Wolf Creek Pass proves long boards. So jealous. Next time I’m up that way I’ll look you up.

    Of course, you are preaching to the choir. I’ve been asking for a Furberg big gun since the beginning of this thread. Low to mid 80s would be perfect. It’s the reason Furberg hasn’t sold at least one solid and one splitboard to me. It’s the reason I’ve been nagging Firstlight. This design category is particularly well suited to longer lengths.

    Furberg: Bring us a big gun.

    @sun_rocket

    #643180
    runard
    13 Posts

    @taylor wrote:

    @runard wrote:

    Hi.
    I’m having a hard time getting comfortable on the split 73. On prepped snow it feels unstable and soft. When I lay it flat it sort of starts drifting. And with lots of pow between tight trees the turning is really hard. Especially the toe turn is a struggle. I’m a beginner/intermediat who have just learnt carving.

    Any tips on how I can tame this board?

    Practice. The only way to get good at turning is practice. Good instruction helps too, as does riding with and watching riders who turn well. But in the end it’s practice.

    Long radius sidecut boards are especially nice for slarving–non-carved or railed turns. You say you just learned carving–I assume that means railing (the entire edge passing through one point in the snow)… You might try practicing your slarves if you’re trying to carve it.

    Thanks!
    Got the turns down on my stiff board, so I have a starting point. Anything in particular that I should practice or do different on the split vs the stiff board? Also: what is a slarve?

    How important is it to line the two halves perfectly? When I slide my bindings on they are no longer flush with each other.

    #643181
    ieism
    298 Posts

    I think European conditions don’t really warrent a longer Furberg. Also people are lighter here 😉

    I have the 167, and didn’t order a second right away as I wasn’t sure if I wanted the largest size too. I ended up getting the 162 as it’s long enough for me exept on the really deep days (like last weekend). The 162 has way more float than any rockered freeride shape of that size I’ve ever been on.

    I borowed the 162 to a friend for day, he just texted me that he misses the Furberg already.

    @runard : If you can’t ride this board on groomers, you need a little more time. My 167 turns on a dime in the trees, and i’m a small guy. I weigh 71kg. Try setting up your bindings a little different, how did you set them now?

    http://flatlandsplitfest.com/

    #643182
    runard
    13 Posts

    I have centered the bindings relative to the holes on the board. Think I put it at +18/+3. But am unsure if I did it correctly. I’m 1,96 so the 73 should be the right size.

    #643183
    Taylor
    792 Posts

    A slarve (think slide-carve) is a word to describe a turn in whch your entire edge is not passing through the same point in the snow. It’s a skidded turn, where the board is aimed further into the turn than parallel to the turn’s arc. You’re pushing snow if you’re slarving. Most snowboarders skid turns and off piste turns are often slarved to check speed and facilitate stability and manuverability in fast-changing snow textures or terrain. When you slarve at ski areas on groomed runs it makes your snowboard sound like a lion or a dinosaur, which is cool.

    You should re-mount your pucks if your board is misaligned in ride mode. It should line up.

    @sun_rocket

    #643184
    runard
    13 Posts

    So a more centered turn where I don’t digg the rail in. Rotate from the middle of the board and let it slide?

    What does the markings a and b mean on the pucks?

    #643185
    Taylor
    792 Posts
    #643186
    runard
    13 Posts

    Thanks everybody.
    Just realized that the bindings where not mounted centered on the board. That might explain some of my difficulties.

    Update: adjusted the bindings correctly and went to try it out in some pow. Most fun I have had in years. Did not matter if it was pow or grooms. I think I’ll start taking my split with me instead of my regular board. Most impressed by how stabile I felt when the terrain changed rapidly from pow to ice. That’s a big plus for a beginner/intermediate.

    #643187
    karkis
    270 Posts

    i gotta chance to try a 167 split…
    i was really impressed. it’s a very easy natural ride, well centred, predictable…

    with the shape and profile it keeps both the float and the power to the edges well distributed, concentrated around the centre and gradually reduced out to the tip n tail.
    the planing attitude is well balanced in deep snow, the wide waist and the extended tip and tail means the float doesn’t apply so much lift from farther out on the board (lever) so its very easy to stay centred, you don’t get tossed around.
    i was concerned that aggressive turn initiation would be limited, but found that you can just turn, and if you want to get aggressive you just keep pushing harder, as you get to the edge around your stance you can be cranking the rail as much as any other.

    one point i think hasn’t really been well described here tho, yah the wide sidecut can hold a rail in a carve, and also distributes pressure evenly on the edge while sliding turns, but on hard snow there is a bit of a transition between the slide and the carve. in soft snow i totally agree it slarves sweetly, but on hardpack i found that it took just a small effort to break from a carve to a slide, like to hit the brakes i first had to drop the edge angle and slide out the tail, then reapply the angle and pressure to dump speed. i think if i spent another day or 2 on the board i would probably stop noticing that little transition.

    i also agree that the board rides smaller than its size, with the extended contact points on tip and tail the effective edge is short for the length, and while the wide sidecut makes the effective edge very effective, there isn’t much length to absorb any chop, esp in sliding turns.
    I’m not that big, 6′ 175#, and i guess I’m accustomed to damp boards, in the ’65-’69 range, i’d love to try the Furberg in 173 or more…

    if anyone wants to try the 167 split around revelstoke, hit me up!

    never summer snowboards
    phantom splitboard bindings
    dynafit touring
    atomic boots

    #643188
    chrishami
    194 Posts

    OK gents, I have a question:
    How does the furberg handle breakable crust?
    I was out this morning on my local hill (we got a famous New Mexico 6″ dump over the weekend) and the snow is already crusting up pretty badly. Rode my Zephyr and had some trouble catching my edges in that crust. I found myself wishing I’d just bootpacked with my furberg solid… I’ve never had it out on breakable crust but it just cruises through the chopped up, tracked out resort snow so it seems to me it would crush the breakable stuff too.

    I may go furberglin’ tomorrow and report back though i fear the snow will be even worse by then…

    167 furberg
    163/26 Venture Helix

    #643189
    HikeforTurns
    1113 Posts

    Yep, Furberg delivers the 1-2 punch straight to the breakable crust’s proverbial bean bag aka spunk bunker aka wedding tackle (as splitrippin might say.)

    The large radius/reverse sidecut profile dominates my old NS with a 8.4ish sidecut in the crust.

    #643190
    chrishami
    194 Posts

    @hikeforturns wrote:

    Yep, Furberg delivers the 1-2 punch straight to the breakable crust’s proverbial bean bag aka spunk bunker aka wedding tackle (as splitrippin might say.)

    The large radius/reverse sidecut profile dominates my old NS with a 8.4ish sidecut in the crust.

    haha muchas gracias. Still happy with your choice of the 167? Permnation was saying awhile back he was outgunned at WC on his 67 when they had 4 feet of fresh. I’m definitely grabbing a split-berg, just not sure which: 167 or 173.

    Thanks again.

    167 furberg
    163/26 Venture Helix

    #643191
    barrows
    1490 Posts

    total agreement with HFT here. The furberg does a great job in breakable crusts, allowing the rider to be much more confident and go faster. Basically, in my experience, any kind of soft variable snow is easier to ride on the furberg (than a traditional board), as the tip and tail do not want to hook, or grab, at the point at which they enter the new snow type. I think the rocker, tapered tip/tail, and long radius sidecut all work together to allow the entry/exit points of the board to more smoothly move between snow types (variations).

    #643192
    keffler
    319 Posts

    I’ve got the 167 split. Really, really happy with it. Rode bottomless powder in Canada and here in Colorado. I don’t see the need to get anything bigger for me. I’m 160# in street clothes and 5’11”. I think the length of the board you want has more to do with how tall you are more than anything, but then again, I’m still a newbie when it comes to really understanding boards and all that so don’t over analyze what I’m getting at.

    I’ve never had a board that was so much fun to ride. How can it be that a board can ride so well at low speeds and high speeds? I don’t know, but I like it. I’ve had it in tight trees, loved it. Maching in open soft snow steeps, love it. Then had to slammed on the brakes, no issues. I rode it one day at Revelstoke Mountain and it rode awesome too. Mainly soft snow, but a little bit of this and that as it was in bounds. Didn’t miss it not being a solid except for the extra weight (however, this board feels lighter than others, not sure why).

    It is a very different ride than I’m use to but in a good way. It turns differently and feels much looser but if you need to lock it in, it seems to do that just fine. Hard to explain.

    Can’t wait for spring to see how it does on steeps and slightly firmer snow, but I’m pretty sure it’s going to be great. I’ll report back in when I get some lines in.

    Like I said, I haven’t really geeked out over boards so I can’t get all techie on why I like it so much, but I do. It’s really hard to put this down to try other boards, but I going to. I will say that I think boards are one of those things that does depend A LOT on a person’s preference and what you want so take my comments as such.

    My only suggestion was to switch to Voile hooks and tip/tail clips as I think they are better when mounted correctly and easier than the K-clips. Not hate’n, just saying. I swapped mine out and like the quite tour and quick standing transitions.

    Daniel, if you ever read this, thank you for taking a risk and making this board. I’m having a blast on it! :guinness:

    #643193
    ieism
    298 Posts

    The only criticism I have is that you have way too much snow flying into your face while riding this thing. I’ve been calling it The Faceshot lately. I’ve been riding the 167 for most of the season, it makes me feel like I can actually snowboard pretty good. I even had some people chearing me on from the chairlift while setting some fast long radius turns. That’s never happened to me before i had the Furberg, I feel very capable on this board.

    http://flatlandsplitfest.com/

    #643194
    chrishami
    194 Posts

    Since I got my furberg women want me and men want to be me…

    @ieism wrote:

    The only criticism I have is that you have way too much snow flying into your face while riding this thing. I’ve been calling it The Faceshot lately.

    The first time I’ve ever heard that complaint.

    Seriously though, thanks fellas. I booted up my local hill this morning for some pre-work furberglin’ with my 167 solid and it was pretty damn good. We got another 2 or 3″ overnight so the conditions were a bit more forgiving than yesterday but not really. I’m thinking I will just go ahead and pull the trigger on the 67 splitty. Doubt I’ll need the 173 in New Mexico, ever. Maybe in the San Juans but not here.

    167 furberg
    163/26 Venture Helix

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