Forums Bindings Dynafit toe piece mounting….. Drill, baby drill?
Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 27 total)
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  • #579922
    JTMaine
    29 Posts

    So I made the switch to TLT5s (which are so comfy and flexy and beautiful, btw) and now I need to figure out the toe piece thing. By some miracle, do the mounting holes in the Dynafit baseplate match the Voile toe pivot baseplate holes? I don’t have the toe pieces yet, but am curious…

    Where can I purchase just the toe pieces?

    Also, can I just make a basic set of slider plates with bails to slide over my existing Voile pucks for ride mode? For now, that seems like a cheap and simple way to go.

    Thanks!

    #676366
    Zude
    367 Posts

    check out Rangers toe pieces they fit the three hole patern..

    #676367
    Jason4
    443 Posts

    Is there any feedback from hardbooters on the Ranger toe pieces? I’d like to pick up a set, maybe two if they are as good as they look.

    As for regular Dynafit toes, I think Keffler sells the low tech light toes and Spark sells the radical toes but I’m sure both are out of stock for the season. You might contact Salewa directly since they are the Dynafit distributor for the US. I’ve got mine mounted on Spark adapter plates but mounting them directly to the board with QuiverKillers would be a nice way to go.

    #676368
    JTMaine
    29 Posts

    Thanks you guys. I checked out those Ranger toe pieces and they are perfect. I sent a note through the Ranger website. Is there a dealer or someone who sells these directly? Couldn’t really tell from the website.

    #676369
    barrows
    1490 Posts

    So far the Ranger toe pieces are unknown in terms of performance and durability… The way the control lever sticks out to the side is a little worrisome to me, but time will tell if this is a problem or not.
    On the other hand, Dynafit toe pieces have been used by many years for split boarders, and work perfectly.
    Dynafit toe pieces can be mounted by using adapters from either Spark R & D or Phantom Splitboard Bindings (see Facebook Page), or one can direct mount. I have been mounting my Dynafit toe pieces using Quiver Killer inserts and titanium bolts to save weight, and have had no issues (for years), but you must do a quality job, and if you are not familiar with doing precision work you might want to have an experienced ski tech do the mount. By direct mounting you save weight.
    In the fall, Phantom Splitboard Bindings will have Dynafit Speed Ultralight toe pieces for sale again, but they will be limited quantities, so get your order in early.
    Phantom Splitboard Bindings are by far the best choice for bindings, and they are also the best splitboard interface available.

    #676370
    JTMaine
    29 Posts

    Barrows (and all);
    Thanks. Being able to get info like this is so great. I have mounted bindings on skis for years, but am not familiar with the “quiver killer” inserts. I’ll check them out. It would be better obviously to mount the toe pieces directly, without an adapter.

    #676371
    barrows
    1490 Posts

    JT, yeah if you are used to mounting skis and using ski screws you should have no trouble using Quiver Killers. The only thing to note is that some boards are a tad too thin, for these one can grind/file a little off the Quiver Killer. They work best in a board with a quality wood core and layup (as snowboards will not have a reinforced binding retention area like skis have), so far I have mounted Dynafit toes on 4 boards using the QKs and have had no difficulties. I have also mounted them without the QKs, just ski screws direct, and that held up fine as well, but I suspect the larger diameter of the QKs give a little more holding power.

    #676372
    chrisNZ
    304 Posts

    Here is some of the new stuff we have been building. Forged carbon adapter plate stronger than 6061-al and lighter.The toe piece pictured is an original prototype. Nothing has changed from this to production. Can be mounted without the adapter plate with quiver killers and one screw.

    Toe piece’s haven’t released from skinning around rocks yet. The way the lock works is downwards force releases the boot so some pretty creative skinning is required to get them to release 🙂 . Kicking an over hanging rock in an upwards direction might do it, im still searching for this kind of skin track to test it on. The locking leaver doesn’t over hang the board. I have split-skied these a lot to test with no release problems soft and hard boots. Skiing has arguably higher forces. We didn’t really set out to make a new tech binding, just a by-product of the 3 years of splitboard binding development.

    Still very much one man in a garage with a beer money sized R and D budget. So if you want to fund new innovation jump on board i need you!

    It was fun getting to Baker Splitfest to meet some of you. Hopefully i can make it to more next year.

    Carry on.

    #676374
    Zude
    367 Posts

    Looks light and simple(less to go wrong). Are these for sale yet? I’m willing to take a chance for the sake of innovation and to support your shear tenacity. These paired with Phantoms or Spark Dynos is the way i’m leaning.

    #676373
    barrows
    1490 Posts

    Chris,

    Thanks for chiming in. I did not mean to disparage your product, sorry. I was not concerned about your toe piece releasing, I was more concerned about the side lever being damaged by a rock when split skiing or skinning through rocky areas-I understand it does not overhang the board, but it does stick out to the side. In deep snowpack regions this is likely a total non-issue, here in Colorado, we do a fair amount of skinng in rocky areas: even my Dynfit toe pieces show signs of occasional rock strick on the outside edges of the arms.
    Cool new carbon mounting plate BTW! Would you publish the weight of the toe piece with carbon mounting plate and the three M6 bolts for comparison purposes, also, the cost of that setup and shipping to the US?
    Do you have a fair amount of hard boot riders using your toe piece, and if so, have their been no issues with use in the field?

    #676375

    Rock skinning in the Arrowsmith’s NZ.

    For what its worth Chris was on this trip testing his bindings and tech touring pieces with no issues skinning through rocky areas from what I witnessed.

    Sorry to drift the thread…

    #676376
    JTMaine
    29 Posts

    From the sound of it, the toe piece has been tested pretty well. I’m willing to try a pair. How do I get some???

    Thanks all, it’s great to have such a wealth of experience from which to draw.

    #676377
    barrows
    1490 Posts

    @JTMaine wrote:

    From the sound of it, the toe piece has been tested pretty well. I’m willing to try a pair. How do I get some???

    Thanks all, it’s great to have such a wealth of experience from which to draw.

    Really? How many 100 day seasons being used by a hard boot rider have these toe pieces seen? I think it is cool that Chris has developed these, but until they have really been put through the wringer I would recommend sticking with Dynafit. Failure of tour mode in the field can be more than just an inconvenience. I would consider these in beta mode right now, perhaps it would be a good idea to carry a spare on any long tours just to be safe until they are fully proven by a few long seasons of hard usage.
    One of the nice things about a tech toe and plate binding set up is the redundancy: even if one has a ride mode failure in the field, one still has an operational tour mode to be able to exit the backcountry. Hearing all the reports of pin failure on Spark Teslas has been a little disturbing to me, although I am sure Spark will have this sorted out for the next season.

    #676378
    Zude
    367 Posts

    Frankly the same could be said about phantoms, they are in beta mode. Only about 100 or so people using them? I’m willing to invest in Phantom as well as Ranger knowing full well that both are small operations that have a passion for the sport and tech, but limited r&d budgets. Barrows you have many days on phantoms and apparently are involved in testing thus have more comfort with this system. Personally Phantoms will be as much of risk for me as Ranger toe pieces (though only a hand full of people may be touring with Rangers now).

    No offense Keffler, from what i gather you have been testing and developing your system with due diligence. Because i haven’t heard of any failures with Phantoms am I supposed to believe non have occured? :twocents:

    #676379
    barrows
    1490 Posts

    @Zude wrote:

    Frankly the same could be said about phantoms, they are in beta mode. Only about 100 or so people using them? I’m willing to invest in Phantom as well as Ranger knowing full well that both are small operations that have a passion for the sport and tech, but limited r&d budgets. Barrows you have many days on phantoms and apparently are involved in testing thus have more comfort with this system. Personally Phantoms will be as much of risk for me as Ranger toe pieces (though only a hand full of people may be touring with Rangers now).

    No offense Keffler, from what i gather you have been testing and developing your system with due diligence. Because i haven’t heard of any failures with Phantoms am I supposed to believe non have occured? :twocents:

    I agree that Phantoms have had limited field use in comparison with Dynafit toe pieces! But I would not consider Phantoms being in beta mode at this point. We have many full time guides using Phantoms, these guys ride 6-7 days a week all season long, and then often travel for summer riding as well. Personally I do not ride that much, but I have averaged 3 days a week splitting for the last two seasons on Phantoms, and have never had a single issue which made it impossible for me to ride or cut my day short. The only failures with Phantom bindings were a few people who broke the fixing pins on the first generation bindings (first season), these were all larger riders and guides who get in a ton of riding. The pin is field replaceable, and it was advised to carry spares. I never broke one, but I did note some wear of the pins after 25 or so days. Keffler re-designed the interface for this season’s bindings, and since then there has not been a single failure.

    But, I was talking about Dynafit toe pieces vs Ranger here; and specifically, I feel the reliability of the tour mode is ultimately more important than that of the ride mode, in that if the tour mode fails deep in the backcountry, one can really be ****ed. If the ride mode fails it is a mere inconvenience, but tour mode really needs to be bomb proof. I had a partner lose a split ski the other day in an avy, we were about 4 miles and 3000′ in. She was able to ski out on a single split ski, but it took a long time. I more willing to “experiment” with ride mode, but tour mode needs to be absolutely reliable for me.

    To be clear though, I am 100% confident that the current Phantom bindings will not ever let me down.

    Chris: do you have any answers to my questions RE number of user days of hard boot riders in the backcountry on the Ranger toe piece, and what is the weight of the toe piece with carbon baseplate and 3 M6 mounting bolts? Like I said, by no means am I trying to disparage Chris’ work, I think it is cool he is making another option. I want to use the “best” toe piece I can. 1st priority is reliability, 2nd is ease of use, and 3rd is weight. Right now tyne Dynafit Speed Ultralight direct mounted is the best I know of, if Ranger is better, for sure I would switch. The only way Ranger could be better for me would be if it was lighter, as Dynafit cannot be bettered in my experience in terms of reliability (it is proven for many years) and ease of use.

    #676380
    chrisNZ
    304 Posts

    43 grams toe piece only direct mount
    31grams FC adapter plate
    no screws weighed.

    The FC adapter plate is way over built but moulds are expensive and we only had one shot at it.
    I didn’t intend these to replace your tech bindings. I admire most tech bindings as they truly are minimal engineering art. These were designed with the locking mech on the side to increase boot rotation. Simple as possible and no simpler.

    There are two moving parts. No springs no icing under the springs when steeping in. And it can release under big loads like a locked out tech binding. These have had one year of testing now. A lot of time has been spent with materials engineers selecting the best materials. We also have a variable weight 80-150kg boot robot that can skin non stop for weeks at a time. We also have pretty good terrain for testing gear… rocky skin tracks are common.

    Of course we dont have 30years of tech binding building experience but were out there every day doing something to improve the current state of things.

    Breaking a toe piece on a rock is likely impossible your inserts will rip before 7075 fails.

    Just got done building a 4th axis for finishing parts off. Its been a steep learning curve with many challenges.

    Finishing opps now on a 4th

    Blanks and parts by

    Test Rig

    #676381
    barrows
    1490 Posts

    Thanks for the details Chris! Good to hear that it is 7075 as well, expensive material, but worth it IMO. The Dynafit Speed Ultralight which I use is 83 grams with mounting bolts. 3 M6x15 bolts are about 10 grams, so the weight is pretty close.

    #676382
    b_ret
    37 Posts

    I had 2 speed superduper ultralight break this winter. Approximately 100 days of touring. So life expectancy of 50 days for the speed super lights?

    First one broke skinning across avi debris. 25km from the road. It still held together for touring and I didn’t really notice it cracked until the next day.

    Second one broke split skiing back to camp through thick chilicotin spruce. Thankfully I had learned to carry an extra toe piece…

    #676383
    buell
    534 Posts

    @b_ret wrote:

    I had 2 speed superduper ultralight break this winter. Approximately 100 days of touring. So life expectancy of 50 days for the speed super lights?

    First one broke skinning across avi debris. 25km from the road. It still held together for touring and I didn’t really notice it cracked until the next day.

    Second one broke split skiing back to camp through thick chilicotin spruce. Thankfully I had learned to carry an extra toe piece…

    Wow. How much do you weigh? Both broke in the same spot.

    #676384
    dishwasher-dave
    460 Posts

    FWIW…I’ve seen other splitters break these red speeds in basically the same area. Itsa bummer cuz the weight is right.

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