Forums Splitboards Chimera Dum Dum-II news/review
Viewing 19 posts - 1 through 19 (of 19 total)
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  • #784959
    barrows
    1490 Posts

    DD-II proto by barrowsworm[/url], on Flickr

    Last season, Myself and John Keffler (of Phantom Splitboard Bindings) worked with Alister of Chimera Splitboards to produce the board we wanted to ride. The original Chimera Dum Dum was used as the starting point, with refinements to the size, shape, flex, and width. Here are the relevant specs:

    Overall Length: 167 CM
    Edge contact: ~123 CM
    Sidecut Radius: 16 M
    Taper: 1.5 CM

    Cannot remember the exact width, but it is designed to be perfect for size 28 TLT 6 boots, and will suit anyone with a size 10 to 11 US foot, 11.5 is likely OK as well. I ride it with a 22″ stance width, with the stance center about 4 cm back from the center of the sidecut.

    The board features: A long radius sidecut for stability, increased edge control, and better float. Considerable taper, to keep the tail easy to push around, and to allow the nose to stay up in pow at slower speeds. A long nose, with very gentle entry points, and low/early rise to provide for generous float up front (think a pointy swallowtail nose cut off to only keep the necessary part).

    I wanted a board I would be happy to ride in every condition I experience in the Colorado backcountry, a board which could handle deep low density pow, all the way to steep icy technical descents. Mine uses a hybrid S-rocker type profile, with camber bumps under each binding position, and early rise tip and tails, but the profile is more subtle than, say, Never Summer’s Rocker/Camber profile. I find this profile gives the best compromise between the edge control of a traditional camber board, and that of a full rocker model. It also offers excellent skinning.

    As for the ride impressions, I am totally impressed, and this board is pretty much exactly what I am looking for in an every day board. In deep pow, the taper and large nose volume allows the board to plane upwards at slower speeds, and then as speed is gained one can put weight forward to pop up onto a plane and feel the acceleration. The straighter sidecut gives a wider waist, so the board floats fantastic in even the lowest density snow, even through turns. The gentle entry points, gentle sidecut, and early rise tip and tail make the board very catch and chatter free, even in difficult conditions (Furberg riders will know what I mean here), but the board does have more overall grip than the Furbergs do. I would say this design kind of splits the difference between the super slarvvy Furberg ride, and the ride of a more traditional board like the Never Summer Prospector. Personally, after lots of experience on the Furberg, I found I wanted something as forgiving, but with a bit more edge grip a little more response, and with this board I have that.
    The long radius sidecut excels at keeping really good edge control in super steep situations, and the catch free nature makes desperate hop turns in dire spots very forgiving and confidence inspiring. Additionally, the catch free nature really smooths out transitions between different snow types in variable conditions.
    The longer radius sidecut takes a little getting used, but once one does get used to it, traditional (8-10 M radius) boards feel twitchy, scary, and dangerous. It is still easy to get shorter radius turns out of this board, by applying additional pressure through downweighting, and the benefits of the long radius are immediately apparent, and become more so the more demanding the riding conditions become.

    Chimera is making this board available this season, in both the 167 and a shorter (I think 160 or so) length. Anyone looking for a top quality, super versatile, directional freeride board for all conditions and especially for progressive freeriding in demanding conditions should seriously consider this board. While it does not appear on the Chimera website, Alister has assured me that he is making them this season, so contact Chimera for more info if you are interested.

    #784961
    Jason4
    443 Posts

    NIce board but tell us more about those bindings. Are they the Pho edition that you’ve mentioned before?

    #784962
    barrows
    1490 Posts

    Jason, let’s keep this thread focused on the Chimera DD-II. please feel free to PM re the bindings. Thanks, barrows

    #784963
    summersgone
    814 Posts

    Interesting. Nice descriptions and write up. The prospector and Furberg I have decent experience with, so I can picture how this may ride. I personally haven’t felt anything I didn’t like about the Furberg yet, but I do get the whole slarve vs carve mentality. The Prospector is more “locked in” and is pretty fun to carve. Both boards are fun and interesting in their own way though. I want to get some more time on the Prospector in all conditions (mostly pow) to understand it a bit more, and see what I prefer, but right now, the majority of the time I’m probably opting for the furberg.

    Alister, bring one to splitfest, I want to try it!

    #784965
    Taylor
    791 Posts

    Cool stick, and nice write up, Barrows. For its length, that shape delivers a ton of surface area, which I like.

    A few questions:

    Any sense of the shovel width?

    How soft is the tail?

    Any idea if Allister would go bigger?

    @sun_rocket

    #784966
    barrows
    1490 Posts

    Cool stick, and nice write up, Barrows. For its length, that shape delivers a ton of surface area, which I like.

    A few questions:

    Any sense of the shovel width?

    I am not home right now, so cannot measure. As one would expect with less sidecut, the nose and tail get a little narrower, and the the waist gets a little wider, to produce the same width at the feet (where it is critical). To me, the taper, width at the feet, and the average width define the performance of the board. I really hesitate on posting width numbers, as making direct width comparisons to typical boards with a 8-10 M radius sidecut will be very misleading.

    How soft is the tail?

    Medium stiff. The entire board I would describe as medium stiff. I prefer the tail to be a little softer, so I can bend it easily to make early turn exits, or to break carves into slarves, etc, in dicey tight spots. I really want some stiffness in the forebode of the board though for stability, and to be able to really rail the entrance portion of higher speed turns.

    Any idea if Allister would go bigger?

    Maybe if he gets enough requests… As far as I know he has not drawn up a longer version though, so he would probably need a fair amount of interest. Although I sure agree he “should” have at least a 172 or so for bigger folks, and correspondingly wider as well to suit 12ish feet.

    #784973
    chase
    31 Posts

    reads like it’s awesome, looks like it’s awesome…
    “quacks like a duck & walks like a duck, it must be a duck”
    nice review

    #784984
    Toke
    69 Posts

    Hei, Barrows can you explain why chimera have more grip than furberg. It does´t make any sense. Or does it? 😉

    I like the colors. Looks like my -88 crazy banana. Chimera is just missing that banana in graffiti.

    http://www.backcountryguidingnorway.com
    Furberg Snowboards
    Black Diamond

    #784997
    maniacdave
    564 Posts

    Didn’t really think I needed another splitboard…

    That was Pontus

    #784999
    96avs01
    874 Posts

    ^^^ this

    @barrrows Thanks for the review, board sounds great!

    165 Venture Divide/Spark Frankenburners/La Sportiva Spantiks
    163W Jones Solution/Phantom Alphas/Dynafit TLT5s
    162 Furberg

    Chris

    #785063
    wjb
    163 Posts

    Great looking board and it ticks all of the boxes. I would plunk down cash tomorrow if they made a size to accommodate my size 13’s. Chimera show some love to the big footed 🙂

    #785075
    barrows
    1490 Posts

    Hei, Barrows can you explain why chimera have more grip than furberg. It does´t make any sense. Or does it? ?

    I like the colors. Looks like my -88 crazy banana. Chimera is just missing that banana in graffiti.

    Hey Toke: I am mainly comparing to my Furberg 172 from the first year of production. The Furberg has a 20 M radius sidecut, and has full rocker (no camber at all), in addition to very short edge contact length and long tapered tip and tail. All of those features make for a very slarvvy ride, really fun in the right conditions, but I wanted something a little more versatile, with a little more tendency to hold a carve rather than wanting to break everything into a slarve. This is of course a personal riding preference.
    The Dum Dum II has an 16 M radius sidecut, so deeper sidecut than the Furberg (but much shallower than the typical 8-9 M radius on most boards), and has some camber (as do the newer Furbergs). The deeper sidecut, the camber bumps under the feet, and the longer effective edge, all combine to offer a bit more traditional feel than the Furberg, but still, the Dum Dum II is not a trad board, as it will still slarve when you want it to…

    #785077
    Toke
    69 Posts

    Aaa, you are comparing it to the first year Furberg. I understand now. New Furberg have plenty of grip and it is easy to ride in difficult conditions, because of camper, better nose and other improvements. Guys did helluva job in testing and developing board in just one year.

    http://www.backcountryguidingnorway.com
    Furberg Snowboards
    Black Diamond

    #785081
    barrows
    1490 Posts

    Aaa, you are comparing it to the first year Furberg. I understand now. New Furberg have plenty of grip and it is easy to ride in difficult conditions, because of camper, better nose and other improvements. Guys did helluva job in testing and developing board in just one year.

    Except that Furberg made the board too wide for good response for me, really a shame… I find with less sidecut, having the board width just right is critical in getting decent response out of it. Anyway, my point was never to say one board is better than another, it is a point of preference: the Furberg was a little too loose riding for me. The new camber ones likely would ride with a bit more grip, but like I said, they are now too wide for me.

    #785160
    Toke
    69 Posts

    No Im not comparing here either and I can´t because I haven´t even tested Chimera. I was just surprised when you were writing that Chimera have more overall grip. That is really hard to understand when 16m radius s-rocker board have more grip than 18 radius camper rocker board. I was riding before 16 m radius s-rocker 167 board and I did´t have as much grip than what I have with Furberg.

    About response. There is HUGE difference in response between first year Furberg and newest Furberg. I think you would be positively surprised. To be honest first year Furberg does´t feel very good after I tried newest Furberg.

    http://www.backcountryguidingnorway.com
    Furberg Snowboards
    Black Diamond

    #785179
    barrows
    1490 Posts

    Toke: I guess that I was not totally clear. I am not meaning to talk about absolute edge grip, but rather, the tendency for the board to slarve, rather than carve, a turn. To be specific, the first year Furbergs very much preferred to slide through turns, rather than carve them. Of course the Furbergs could be made to carve an arc, with enough application of skill by the rider, but to my preference, the tended to be a little too slarvvy and not quite carvy enough. To be sure, in terms of ultimate edge grip, a good rider could certainly get that out of them, but I am more concerned with the tendency of the board in general, if that makes sense.
    Indeed, the addition of slightly deeper sidecuts, more edge contact, and camber on the newer Furbergs should make them a little less slarvvy in tendency, as is the design goal of the Chimera DD-II.

    Like I said, too bad the new Furbergs are a bit too wide for me. I need the 168, and it is indeed quite a bit wider than previous versions. Every rider I know who has ridden the new Furbergs has noticed the slower response edge to edge of the wider versions vs. the previous models. In my experience, boards with straighter sidecuts really need to have just the right width (relative to boot size) to be retain response. I would have to ride the 164 of Furbergs current models to get the right width, and that board is too short for me. In any case, this is all down to boot size and board length preferences, and not meant to be a criticism of Furberg, just a note that the current ones are too wide for my preferences.

    #785197
    Toke
    69 Posts

    OK now I understand you..again and I totally agree that Furberg is not made for carving turns. More traditional board should be better for that.
    This response thing is interesting. I was using soft boots setup with older Furberg splitboard, but I changed to hard boot setup with new Furberg. I haven´t even tested it with soft boot setup, because it is just great with hard boots.
    Honestly I have been feeling that response is great with new board. Faster you go better response you are going to get. Older Furberg and soft boot setup was not so fast to turn.

    But this comparing is so hard because we people have so different body types, weight, riding style etc. I guess everyone have to find his “own board´(s)”.

    Im going to test Gentemstick next year too so it is interesting to see difference between Furberg and Gentemstick. But first we need some snow here in west
    Norway.

    http://www.backcountryguidingnorway.com
    Furberg Snowboards
    Black Diamond

    #785391
    powslash
    382 Posts

    Nice board.

    #788260
    barrows
    1490 Posts

    Looks like the DD-II was a big hit at the Canada Splitfest!

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