Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 21 total)
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  • #567656
    270boarderman
    10 Posts

    I was wondering who makes a good pack for backcountry boarding. I mite possibly be doing some over nighters next year.

    #587589
    Yoda
    264 Posts

    Something around 60+ liters should do the job for an overnight winter trip. It all depends on what you’re planning on bringing. If you are going ultra-minimalist you could use a 40 liter pack or smaller. As far as design there are not too many packs that are 60+ liters and carrry a snowboard. Osprey, Dakine, and I think Burton & K2 snowboards make something in that range, but most are 50 liters and smaller. Marmot may have something since they are the formally Dana Design packs which had a Shove-it snowboard carrying feature.
    Good features to look for are a dedicated shovel pocket, probe & shovel handle pocket, pocket ideal for skins with a drainage hole or mesh, goggle/sunglass pocket, map pocket, helmet holder, removeable foam back-pad (doubles as a bivy pad), easy access to the main compartments, well designed snowboard carrying attachment (some are better than others), and a frame that flexes with your body. Hope this helps. Cheers!

    #587590
    docwild
    24 Posts

    Check the black diamond avalung packs.

    #587591
    270boarderman
    10 Posts

    never mind the over nighter

    #587592
    powderjunkie
    1669 Posts

    don’t give up that easy.

    #587593
    ChrisI
    48 Posts

    I’ve been really happy with my Osprey Ceres 50.. With some work, I bet you could do a night or two ines a Ceres 38, but even the 50 felt pretty tight until I got my systems dialed (an ongoing process).. Another thing to consider is go get a smaller daypack to piggyback onto a 40/50 liter overnight pack.. I’ve been thinking about using a Switch 14 or similar. I think it was bcr with this setup.. he might have some input.

    -C

    #587594
    TEX
    2486 Posts

    I have to agree with Chris I, also Im an owner of the Osprey Ceres 50. I have done a weekend with mine, had to strap my bag and tent to the bottom but wa able to trek to saddlebag with no problems. When I get to camp it is small enough to use as a day pack. What seperated the good from the bad for me was the strapping system for snowboards. The only packs that met my standards on that were osprey ceres, Black Diamond and arcterxy . Now Mountain Hardware is making packs so I would check those out too. I wouldnt buy any pack made by a snowboard company because I feel it wont hold up to the backcountry. Clothing is the same in my opion. Best bet is to go to REI, have yourself sized, carry what you plan to carry in the BC with you , pull a pack down and stuff it. Thats the best way to tell what size you need. And as others have said you tend to carry more the first season that the second, because you will learn to pack llighter and lighter

    #587595
    bcrider
    4150 Posts

    @docwild wrote:

    Check the black diamond avalung packs.

    hi chris,

    Can you please expand on the snowboard carrying compatibility of these packs? I was under the impression that they won’t carry a board but in another thread you said they would.

    Based on these pics from http://www.telemarktips.com it’s difficult to tell. I definitely don’t see anything real obvious. Do the side ski straps reverse for vertical board carry or something?

    I’m really excited about these packs otherwise. The concept seems great as it adds another layer of protection from burial.

    http://www.telemarktips.com/FirstLook9.html

    #587596
    ChrisI
    48 Posts

    P420, there’s gonna be a whole gang of matching Ceres people @ TPR. This should be interesting. Such a bomber pack; I’ve even used it as a haul bag! 😈

    Also, right on about the snowboarding-specific brands.. None of them have been holding up to the abuse over the last few years. Think about going with brands like Marmot, Patagonia, Osprey, Arc’teryx, instead of Da’kine, Burton, sessions, etc. Well worth the investment, and the gear’s designed and constructed far better.

    -C

    #587597
    ChrisI
    48 Posts

    Hmm, I dig the avalung pack idea, too. If it were incorporated into a pack, I might be more prone to carry it. Dont know anything about them, but I bet you could get a sideways carry with the top-flap-straps, at least on the bottom one.

    #587598
    bcrider
    4150 Posts

    @patroller420 wrote:

    I have done a weekend with mine, had to strap my bag and tent to the bottom but was able to trek to saddlebag with no problems.

    That’s only because you bring too much other stuff. 😉

    With careful packing and a good system everything you need for a few nights in the bc should be able to fit inside a 50L pack. The Ceres 50 is a great option. Its pretty light yet still provides comfortable support and can also carry a snowboard well (not all large volume packs can do this) for those spring approaches where dry trail walking is required.

    While the Ceres 50 does compress great on small loads (daytrips) I’m a fan of bringing a smaller pack for this use. The Osprey Switch 14 or some of the Da Kine Heli packs are great options. You can store them flat on the inside or outside of your pack (depending on your system) and have a sweet little daypack for riding.

    Ps/ welcome 270boarderman! 8)

    #587599
    bcrider
    4150 Posts

    @ChrisI wrote:

    I bet you could get a sideways carry with the top-flap-straps, at least on the bottom one.

    horizontal carry sucks imho…unless you are on a sled.

    #587600
    bcrider
    4150 Posts

    @ChrisI wrote:

    P420, there’s gonna be a whole gang of matching Ceres people @ TPR.

    Speaking of the upcoming TPR trip…I feel really left out. What gives jimw!?

    #587601
    jimw
    1421 Posts

    @bcrider wrote:

    Speaking of the upcoming TPR trip…I feel really left out. What gives jimw!?

    Check yer PM’s…

    #587602
    powderjunkie
    1669 Posts

    yeah, any openings for TPR.

    Lots of day packs to choose from, but finding an overnight pack that works for splittin’ and carrying your board when needed, that can compress enough and is light weight enough to use during the day once you’ve set up camp, are few and far between.

    The hip belt can’t be too big or bulky or it compromises the riding.

    Osprey probably makes the best packs for this (ceres and switch series)

    I’m using an older Burton AK pack (4,500 cu. in.?) that is perfect for this, but I don’t think they make them anymore.

    I’m not a big fan of bringing an extra yo yo pack, but I know it works for some.

    Harder still is to find a women’s specific overnight, snowboard carrying backpack. Osprey Ariel looks like a good option for women.

    #587603
    jimw
    1421 Posts

    @powderjunkie wrote:

    yeah, any openings for TPR.

    Check yer PM’s…

    #587604
    huFfer
    51 Posts

    @ChrisI wrote:

    Also, right on about the snowboarding-specific brands.. None of them have been holding up to the abuse over the last few years. Think about going with brands like Marmot, Patagonia, Osprey, Arc’teryx, instead of Da’kine, Burton, sessions, etc. Well worth the investment, and the gear’s designed and constructed far better.

    -C

    What experience have you had that makes this a valid statement?

    My Arcteryx Bora 90 and Kamsin 62 have both fallen apart while my old Cirque Works and DaKine Guide, snowboard specific packs, which see equal abuse, live on.

    IMO The Dakine Guide is the ideal BC snowboard pack. Big enough for a well thought out over nighter but small enough to be used every day. The back panel access rocks and it carries well both verticaly and horizontaly (although not intended to be done) for us cross-over sledneckers.

    Does Patagonia even make packs?!? 🙄

    #587605
    rokstar
    18 Posts

    I have a ceres 38 and it’s awesome, although too small for overnight winter trips. I was looking to get a larger version, but it seems that osprey no longer makes the ceres series? It looks like they’ve been replaced by the exposure series – any experience with those?

    #587606
    ChrisI
    48 Posts

    @huFfer wrote:

    @ChrisI wrote:

    Also, right on about the snowboarding-specific brands.. None of them have been holding up to the abuse over the last few years. Think about going with brands like Marmot, Patagonia, Osprey, Arc’teryx, instead of Da’kine, Burton, sessions, etc. Well worth the investment, and the gear’s designed and constructed far better.

    -C

    What experience have you had that makes this a valid statement?

    My Arcteryx Bora 90 and Kamsin 62 have both fallen apart while my old Cirque Works and DaKine Guide, snowboard specific packs, which see equal abuse, live on.

    IMO The Dakine Guide is the ideal BC snowboard pack. Big enough for a well thought out over nighter but small enough to be used every day. The back panel access rocks and it carries well both verticaly and horizontaly (although not intended to be done) for us cross-over sledneckers.

    Does Patagonia even make packs?!? 🙄

    Easy there tiger. I’m not speaking specifically of packs, but of the quality of the brands in general. And yes, to reiterate, in my experience I’ve seen not only a difference in durability, but design quality also.

    Glad yours worked out for ya. 🙂

    -C

    #587607
    nomad
    288 Posts

    Good to see the different perspectives.

    I myself have actually been interested in getting a new pack for next year. Unfortunately, my requirements are rather hard to meet.

    Needs to:

    Be large enough to accomodate 2 nights’ food and gear along with glacier/technical/avy gear

    Carry two ice axes and a picket or two

    Carry my split in either split or board mode, preferably both

    Pack down smallish for day trips

    Be durable and comfortable

    Right now I have a Arcteryx Bora 80 (I think) and an MEC A-Star daypack.

    I’ve done the double pack thing, and my second is rather large so I can accommodate ice/trad gear, crampons, shovel, probe, saw, first aid kit, rope, etc. Using a smaller second would not be an option. If I could just find a single pack that fit my needs it would be great. That and an affordable down sleeping bag……

    Suggestions?

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