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  • #799145
    Yoda
    264 Posts

    Welcome to split boarding! At your weight and the addition of a 10lb+ pack, you’d probably be better off on the 168cm. What you also need to be concerned about is your boot size relationship. The Landlord 168 is 26.1cm wide (waist) which depending on your stance angles, the biggest boot this ideally accommodates is a size 11.5-12 max.
    You could get away with the 163cm at 205, but you’re at the top of the recommended weight range. However the smaller board would be nicer for tree riding and touring, so it may be worth the added flex as a tradeoff. If there’s a Burton demo center or dealer near you, I’d try to the demo the board first. I know the 168 is no longer in production, so try the 163 and see how it feels.

    #797468
    Yoda
    264 Posts

    If you’re worried about warmth with a synthetic, you should be solely focused on the amount of insulation that’s inside the garment. Unfortunately most brands fail to indicate this information.

    I wanted to chime back in a say that my statement above is coming from the perspective of the heat that is being created by the insulation is being protected and preserved by an outer shell fabric or covering.

    Arc’teryx and Patagonia for example both make synthetic jackets that preserve the heat that the insulation is generating with wind resistant or windproof face fabrics. Other synthetic jackets (also made by both of these companies) are designed to be more “air permeable” and utilize reduced wind resistant face fabrics, thus the heat generated from the insulation can be lost faster if not protected by an outer shell.

    The Arc’teryx Atom AR is more of an outer jacket that can be also used as a mid layer in colder conditions. The Patagonia Nano Air on the other hand is more of an mid layer since it incorporates an “air permeable” face fabric and insulation (hence the “Air” name). It still can be used as an outer jacket in milder conditions, but it will not be as wind resistant as the Atom jacket.

    #797366
    Yoda
    264 Posts

    Check out this new axe from Petzl…
    https://www.petzl.com/NL/en/Sport/Ice-axes/RIDE#.WFh7-7GZOi4

    Similar to the Sum’Tec 43 but with a lighter head and an adze instead of a hammer. Looks pretty cool!

    #797356
    Yoda
    264 Posts

    Here are some facts to consider as far as which garment will be the warmest. It’s all about the amount of insulation!

    Arc’teryx’s Atom AR will be the warmest with 120g/80g insulation.
    Arc’teryx’s Proton AR (equivalent to the Patagonia Nano Air) will be less warm with 90g/65g insulation.
    Patagonia’s Nano Air or Nano Puff will be even less warm with only 60g insulation.
    First Light does not indicate the amount of insulation in their garment, so who knows how warm it is. I would also avoid ANY brand that states a temp range for their products as this can not be quantified when it comes to garments.

    If you’re worried about warmth with a synthetic, you should be solely focused on the amount of insulation that’s inside the garment. Unfortunately most brands fail to indicate this information.

    #674819
    Yoda
    264 Posts
    #668539
    Yoda
    264 Posts

    @wjb wrote:

    I am looking for an ultralight (hopefully sub 3 lbs) 2 person tent for spring missions to the Sierras and summer backpacking. It shouldnt have to deal with a heavy snow load but it should handle strong winds without collapsing. What is everybody using? Thanks

    Hi Wade! Here are my recommendations…
    If you like the idea of “crawling out of the trunk of a car”, then check out these “front door” tents
    Big Angnes Fly Creek/Fly Creek Platinum
    Easton Kilo
    Mtn Hardwear SuperMega

    If you like the idea of “crawling out of a car” in more of the traditional method using “side doors”, then check out these tents…
    Big Agnes Copper Spur
    Nemo Obi/Obi Elite
    MSR Carbon Reflex
    Mtn. Hardwear Skyledge

    Note: Avoid tents with only ONE side door! It’s not cool waking/hitting your partner in the middle of the night trying to get in/out for/from a pee run.

    I personally use the Obi Elite 1P for solo missions and the Obi 3P for two person missions. I used to represent for both MtnHW and Nemo, so I’m kind of biased towards them, but all of these brands make awesome tents! Got test them out first. Fit, features and set-up are all key deciding factors in addition to weight, door configuration and pack size. Good luck! 😉

    #658876
    Yoda
    264 Posts

    +1 for a teepee/floor-less type tent.
    You should check out Nemo’s Pentalite. It sleeps up to 3 people comfortably for winter applications. It has a dedicated area for gear and/or cooking and is much easier to set it up tight (verses the competition) due to it’s shape. At just under 3.5lbs it’s the best winter tent that I’ve ever used. Note: I’ve also used GoLite, Mtn Hardware, Garuda, and Blackdiamond teepee tents as well. http://www.nemoequipment.com/nemo2012-pentalite2012-tent
    Nemo’s Transform Tarp is another teepee type option. It sleeps up to 2 people comfortably for winter use and is just over 2.5lbs. It doesn’t set up as nice as the Pentalite, but it gets the job done wonderfully.
    http://www.nemoequipment.com/nemo2012-Transform-Tarp-tent

    Personally I would avoid a bivy because you’ll want space to store your gear out of the elements and/or for cooking. I’ve done the bivy thing during the winter and will never do it again.

    #597676
    Yoda
    264 Posts

    I’m still using the Pulse. I’ve had zero complaints or issues. :thumpsup:

    Note: The parent company of Deuter purchased Ortovox and I’ve heard some rumors about them merging the US devisions. If this actually happens, then I’ll most likely be switching to the S1+.

    Any feedback on the S1+ would be nice to know.

    #651802
    Yoda
    264 Posts

    If you’re patient I would suggest waiting for Sierra Design’s new DriDown jackets. No joke and it’s quite amazing to see it demonstrated in person.

    #651785
    Yoda
    264 Posts

    Western Mountaineering – Flight
    Rab – Microlight Alpline
    Montbell – UL
    Arc’teryx – Solo (synthetic) I use this jacket when it’s really wet or humid.

    :thumpsup:

    #646759
    Yoda
    264 Posts

    Silva Sweden was sold last year, so as a result, Silva Sweden & Brunton USA have parted ways.

    Check out Brunton’s new USA made compasses that have a sighting mirror, adj. declination and a 0-90 degree clinometer… http://store.bruntonoutdoor.com/navigation/brunton-oss-technology/brunton-o.s.s.-50m/

    Here’s their full-featured version… http://store.bruntonoutdoor.com/navigation/brunton-oss-technology/brunton-o.s.s.-60m/

    #646756
    Yoda
    264 Posts

    I’ve recently compared several compass brands available in the US that ALL have adjustable declination, a sighting mirror & a 0-90 degree clinometer. Here’s the list…

    Brunton – Eclipse/Eclipse Pro
    Brunton – 15TDCL
    K&R – Alpin
    K&R – Lumo Tec
    K&R – Sherpa BW2
    Silva USA – Ranger CL
    Suunto – MB-6
    Suunto – MC-2

    Out of all of these, my overall favorite is K&R’s Lumo Tec for its size, weight, quality, simplicity & features. Second runner up is Suunto’s MB-6.

    My other personal favorite is the MC-2. The reason for my bias is Suunto is the only compass manufacturer that offers a “Global” needle version that allows their compasses to work in both N & S hemispheres. It costs a bit more, but you’ll only need to buy one compass if you travel worldwide. Suunto also offers the MB-6 with the “Global” needle… that’s why I gave it 2nd in my pick. Note: Both of these compasses are available without the ‘Global” needle.

    I have Brunton’s 26DNL-CL compass and I have to agree with Han’s review above. I’ve carried & used this compass merely because it was lighter & more compact and I felt it was sufficient for my needs. However thinking more about it… If I’m in need of a compass, I don’t want a toy, I want a tool. Plus the clinometer only goes up to 60 degrees on this compass. The Lumo Tec is nearly the same size as this Brunton model, but it comes with ALL of the “key” features & a way better hinge design.:thumpsup:

    #649414
    Yoda
    264 Posts

    @snowvols wrote:

    Does anyone use a GPS watch to track their info while skinning? Since I am a runner as well, I am looking at getting a Garmin 610 and wanted to use it to track info while skinning. How well does it collect that info?

    Thanks! :guinness:

    You should NEVER use a GPS device while wearing an avalanche beacon!!!

    There’s plenty of info online about this topic. Here’s one that I quickly found with a demo video… http://www.skiingthebackcountry.com/ski-articles/beacon_malfuction

    Electronics that put off signals with a given frequency can mess with a beacon’s 457 frequency. Don’t take any chances! 😉

    #649306
    Yoda
    264 Posts

    You might try some grip-tape like what’s found on skateboards. Just stick some on the top-sheet under the pucks and you should see a difference. It worked well for a buddy who was having the same problem with puck migration. 😉

    #646754
    Yoda
    264 Posts

    @yoda wrote:

    I found one that’s even smaller & lighter with ALL of the key features… http://www.thecompassstore.com/mb6.html

    I received a cool XMas gift… I got an older swiss-made Recta DP-10 compass that’s the original design of the Suunto MB-6. Note: Suunto owns Recta.

    This is the first time I’ve played with this uniquely designed compass. I have to say it’s quite innovative. The one I got even has a prismatic viewing option for super precise sighting & surveying. This compass design is still currently used by the Swiss military and several others including some US forces.

    The only thing it’s missing are some basic map tools (i.e. magnifier & ruler options), but it’s still a very efficient compass.

    I should receive the K&R german compass this week and will post some reviews. I also have a Suunto MC-2 that I can compare it against.

    I have to admit I’m kind of a compass geek. Check out this online museum if you like compasses… http://www.compassmuseum.com/
    Look out for my very rare Triumph marching compass featured on this site.

    #646753
    Yoda
    264 Posts

    @yoda wrote:

    I just ordered this one… http://www.thecompassstore.com/lumotec.html

    Pros: German made and the smallest one with a mirror, clinometer & adj. declination. :thumpsup:

    Cons: Not cheap. 🙁

    I found one that’s even smaller & lighter with ALL of the key features… http://www.thecompassstore.com/mb6.html

    Pros: Made in Finland. Cheaper price @ $50

    Brunton also makes the 8040G that has ALL of the key features. It’s not much smaller than their 15TDCL, but it’s only 1.6oz @ $44. The only bummer is the clinometer only goes up to 35 degrees.

    Good choice JRoh for getting the Brunton compass. That one works really well and is made by Silva in Sweden. :thumpsup:

    #644990
    Yoda
    264 Posts

    @strain wrote:

    I find the straps on my guide way too flimsy to support any sort of load – if you’ve got it stuffed full, it ain’t comfy.

    Anyone know a similar sized (55-60L) pack that has legit snowboard carry?

    Did you see this thread? viewtopic.php?f=17&t=4926

    I also posted a thread about alpine packs in this size range (60L+)… viewtopic.php?f=17&t=4339

    Lately I’ve been scoping out the Arc’teryx Arrakis 65, but I already own an Osprey Exposure 66 and a Wookey Phoenix 65 w/ Wookey’s snowboard carry system. I really like the Arrakis’ design and it has a nice suspension plus a harness system that can be adjusted to carry a snowboard really well. I’ve not seen a full-sized pack yet that really has a dedicated snowboard harness (Wookey was the closest IMO). The Mountainsmith pack mentioned in the thread above came with a “decent” harness built in for carrying a board, but I think it could have been better designed.

    I’ve asked Deuter to design a full-sized alpine pack based on one of their older snow packs called the Glide 35+. They currently make an alpine pack called the Guide 45+ that carries skis and splitboards in A-frame mode really well, but I want them to build a Glide 45+ & 65+ that allows for ALL attachment options. 😉

    #646749
    Yoda
    264 Posts

    I just ordered this one… http://www.thecompassstore.com/lumotec.html

    Pros: German made and the smallest one with a mirror, clinometer & adj. declination. :thumpsup:

    Cons: Not cheap. 🙁

    #642457
    Yoda
    264 Posts

    @wibby wrote:

    I have 11 feet and ride 25cm boards… and have been totally fine. At 11 you really do not need a wide board.

    although, even if you did have toe-drag, how much are you going to be riding a split on hardpack?

    I know lots of people that make that size work with size 11s, but it’s not ideal unless you ONLY ride powder. Like I said it also depends on your binding angles and also the binding height in relation to the deck plays a role in what can work. I’m just saying that the industry recognizes that board width is very important in relation to boot size and certain board sizes work better with certain boot sizes.

    I also agree that you do not need a “wide” board either for a size 11 (+/- one size), you actually need a mid-wide board to be correct. That’s why I ride another brand that offers mid-wide specs. 😉

    Btw… In CA we can encounter every type of snow conditions in the same day… hardpack to waistdeep+ depending on where you’re at on the mountain.

    #642418
    Yoda
    264 Posts

    Food for thought… Considering the width options on the Panoramic, I hope that anyone with size 11 and bigger feet is not considering this board unless they are only looking at the 168cm model. For a size 11 boot the 168 is really the only model that can work without issues with heel & toe drag unless you mount your bindings with steep angles. The 162 is a 25.4cm waist and dimensionally is really too narrow for a size 11 boot especially with low binding stance angles. I’m surprised that this hasn’t been mentioned yet. Width has always been more important than length when it comes to buying a board. :scratch:

Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 221 total)